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Thread: Questions about internet connection sharing with Comcast cable internet

  1. #1
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    Question Questions about internet connection sharing with Comcast cable internet

    Ok. From what I have seen in other posts concerning this issue, I understand that comcast does "not" usually allow home networking using windows internet connection sharing. I have a 4-port 10base-T inethernet hub, 1 toshiba cable modem, and 3 computers. Two of the computers are currently connected thru the hub to the modem and I pay for the additional IP address for the second one. (this will soon be coming to an end because of the cost) The problem is I would like to share the internet connection between the third and first computers and not have to pay for the additional IP because it gets used very seldom, but I don't want to waste time swapping ethernet cards out so the third machine will have the correct MAC address so comcast will "allow" it to access their servers. Can anything be done to get around this?

  2. #2
    Elite Member BaLa's Avatar
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    purchase a router

  3. #3
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    excuse my brain fade on this but what is a router, how does it work, and how will that keep comcast from seeing each computer's MAC address?

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    You can use ICS on comcast cable. I curently am doing the same with my lap top. What you will need to do is install ICS on the host machine, but before doing that you need to have 2 NIC cards in the host machine (host machine would be the one with the direct internet access) In addition you will need to get an cross over cat 5 cable if you dont already have one. Run the modem into your first Nic then use the cross over cable to your hub, and connect all your other pc's to the hub. If you are unsure on how to set up ICS on your host machine you could do a number of things to figure it out, one of the esiest is just go to your help menu on your pc and read the instructions there.

  5. #5
    Elite Member BaLa's Avatar
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    actually the router would be the best way to do that...

    b/c it functions on its own

    and from my experience it's MUCH easier to use than ICS
    it's also safer...(most if not all routers have a built in firewall)


    that is the def. of a router
    http://searchnetworking.techtarget.c...212924,00.html


    also read this

    "Help me decide!

    If you ended up on this page, you probably need some help deciding how to get started in sharing your cable modem.
    Below you'll find a list of alternatives and a short explanation to help you understand your choices. "
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...is.htm#MultiIP

  6. #6
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    You have basically two approaches to sharing your connection.

    A software approach, like Windows built in ICS, or 3rd party software like SyGate, WinGate, other "proxy" like software. One computer has 2x NICs....one to the broadband modem, the other to your hub/switch which leads to the other computers. Less expensive approach, but your computer that has 2x NICs...the "server"...has to be on all the time for others to access the internet, plus it's a bit slower...hit the "servers" CPU hard...all done through software as you can see. You'll also want a software firewall on your box...for protection. Another performance hit that eats up CPU cycles and slows you down.

    A hardware approach...my preferred method...a router. One device that connects to your broadband modem, and also has a built in hub/switch...most models now have a 4 port switch built in. The router logs on for you, has it's own CPU and memory so it does all the work sharing the connection....no impact on performance of the other computers. Also has a built in NAT firewall that provides basic protection for you...hides you network completely...is the only device that can be seen on the public side...and most models have a completely dead "stealth" mode. No computer has to be on all the time for others to access the internet. Easy to setup, controlled with a web admin interface. Better for online gaming also. Compatible with cable and DSL. DSL is usually PPPoE (username and password). Cable is either MAC cloning, or host name to log in. Must find out what your ISP uses to configure the router to work correctly with your ISP.
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  7. #7
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    My ISP uses the ethernet card's MAC address to "see" whether or not it has authorization to access the network. In other words, if I simply swap out ethernet cards in this computer I am using right now, I will no longer have access to the internet because of the different MAC address (or serial number on the NIC card). So my question really is, can I assign a MAC address to the router so my ISP will "allow" it access?

    I tired doing the software method using Windows ICS between the host computer (which had two NIC's) and a laptop which was set up to share with the host. For some reason, I could not access anything on the internet, nor access anything between the two computers (printers, hard drives, etc) although each computer could detect the other over the windows home networking wizard.

    According to my ISP, their software, nor policy agreement allows home networking at all. Could it be that their software (which is installed on my computer) is not allowing the use of the windows HNW or ICS? Is there any way around this?

  8. #8
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Originally posted by MadMax350
    So my question really is, can I assign a MAC address to the router so my ISP will "allow" it access?
    Yes, most routers support "MAC" spoofing.
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