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Thread: It's Official!!! Comcast has comfirmed they are tracking all users!

  1. #1
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    It's Official!!! Comcast has comfirmed they are tracking all users!

    I just saw it on TechLive...they have confirmed that they are tracking everybody for purposes of rebuilding their network and to top it off....all the information can be used in a subpoena!

    brb when I can get a few links on this story!

    http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGAMFFCEMXC.html

    Anyone know of a way to defeat this?

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  2. #2
    Official Photographer Dakota's Avatar
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    That's really nothing new. All ISP's track you in one way or another and are required by law to provide that information in a subpoena. @home was that way too. It's in the contract.
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  3. #3
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    Comcast Tracks Web Browsing of Its 1 Million Internet Subscribers
    By Ted Bridis Associated Press Writer
    Published: Feb 12, 2002

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Comcast Corp., the nation's third-largest cable company, has begun tracking the Web browsing activities of its 1 million high-speed Internet subscribers without notifying them.
    Comcast said Tuesday the tracking of each Web page a subscriber visits was part of a technology overhaul designed to save money and improve the speed of cable Internet service to its customers and was not intended to infringe on privacy.

    But technology experts cautioned that the data could be subpoenaed by law enforcement agencies or lawyers in civil cases, and they questioned whether Comcast's move reflects a more cavalier attitude toward online privacy in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

    "Once you're sitting on it, you're really inviting all kinds of requests," said David Sobel of the Washington-based Electronic Privacy Information Center. "If they can't identify a need to be collecting it, they should take the necessary steps to eliminate it."

    The company that sold Comcast the technology acknowledged the cable company is collecting too much information.

    "It's not needed," said Steve Russell, a vice president for Inktomi Corp. Russell said Inktomi's software also records other information from Comcast subscribers, such as passwords for Web sites and credit-card numbers under limited circumstances.

    Russell discounted privacy concerns, saying engineers are using the information to improve Comcast performance.

    Two of the nation's largest Internet providers, America Online and Earthlink, said they do not track the Web browsing of their combined 35 million subscribers.

    "We definitely would have no interest in doing that at all," said Earthlink's chief privacy officer, Les Seagraves. "We don't want to have customer records about where they've visited."

    AOL uses performance-enhancing technology, similar to that introduced by Comcast, on its network. But AOL spokesman Nicholas Graham said, "We do not track the personal Web activity of our members for privacy reasons."

    Comcast spokesman Tim Fitzpatrick said Web browsing was already being recorded for its subscribers in Detroit and in parts of Delaware and Virginia, and would be extended across the nation by the end of this week.

    He acknowledged customers weren't notified.

    Fitzpatrick said Comcast, using the Inktomi software, is recording the numeric Internet address uniquely assigned to each subscriber, along with the Internet address of each requested Web page. Comcast stores the information for days before it's deleted, but it won't say for exactly how long.

    Comcast's tracking is part of an overhaul using behind-the-scenes "proxy" computers, which funnel Web surfing through powerful, centralized computers. Customers previously could volunteer to use these proxy computers, but they are automatically activated now. The proxy computers track the most popular Web sites to determine which ones should be copied to its central computers.

    Industry experts said there was no need to match Web surfing back to specific subscribers.

    "I'm furious," said George Imburgia, an Internet security expert in Dover, Del., and a Comcast customer. "They're monitoring and logging everybody's activities." Imburgia compared it to the surveillance software the FBI uses: "It's an evil, Carnivore-type thing."

    Outfitted with high-tech eavesdropping tools and a court order, the FBI can secretly record what a person does online - but only after agents identify the target and install monitoring equipment.

    Police and the FBI are increasingly turning to computer evidence in criminal and terrorist investigations. Just last month, the FBI warned that al-Qaida members had sought information about dangerous insecticides from Internet sites. Since Sept. 11 some Internet providers have been served with warrants for subscriber information under a powerful 1978 anti-terrorism law.

    AP-ES-02-12-02 1855EST

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  4. #4
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    Originally posted by SilverDakota
    That's really nothing new. All ISP's track you in one way or another and are required by law to provide that information in a subpoena. @home was that way too. It's in the contract.
    Show me....please. For my own benefit I want to see that in writing.

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  5. #5
    Elite Member Jim's Avatar
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    I think that's true to a certain extent as well, but I'm not sure on specifics, and would also like to know more.

    And UOD, the same thread beat you again, but this time it was Kip who got it in ahead of you:

    http://forums.speedguide.net/showthr...threadid=67542


  6. #6
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    Originally posted by BIGJIMSLATE
    I think that's true to a certain extent as well, but I'm not sure on specifics, and would also like to know more.

    And UOD, the same thread beat you again, but this time it was Kip who got it in ahead of you:

    http://forums.speedguide.net/showthr...threadid=67542


    Speedguide Search didn't turn up anything Jimbo....I'm posting this regardless of who posted it first because it needs/requires exposure to increase the awareness level around here. Maybe you guys could phrase your topics better....Kip's reply has no subject heading and was worthy of it's own thread.

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  7. #7
    Elite Member Jim's Avatar
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    I know, I know, I'm just bugging you a bit (as well as giving you a free bump).

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    Official Photographer Dakota's Avatar
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    Originally posted by UOD


    Show me....please. For my own benefit I want to see that in writing.
    I don't have time to scan it right now, but will do so later this evening. It's in my original TCI@home contract, and here's the second paragraph from section 5, titled: Collection.

    5. (b) Collection of information TCI collects, uses and releases information on customer use of the Service as necessary to render the Service and to otherwise undertake legitimate business activities related to the service. TCI may collect personally identifiable information on customer preferences which are reflected in the choices that a customer makes among the range of services offered as a part of the Services, the time that a customer actually uses the Service, the menus and features used most often by the customer. and other information about a customer's "electronic browsing."

    There are other paragraphs titled Use of Information and Confidentiality of Information, but I think that pretty much gets the point across.
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  9. #9
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    Originally posted by SilverDakota


    I don't have time to scan it right now, but will do so later this evening. It's in my original TCI@home contract, and here's the second paragraph from section 5, titled: Collection.

    5. (b) Collection of information TCI collects, uses and releases information on customer use of the Service as necessary to render the Service and to otherwise undertake legitimate business activities related to the service. TCI may collect personally identifiable information on customer preferences which are reflected in the choices that a customer makes among the range of services offered as a part of the Services, the time that a customer actually uses the Service, the menus and features used most often by the customer. and other information about a customer's "electronic browsing."

    There are other paragraphs titled Use of Information and Confidentiality of Information, but I think that pretty much gets the point across.

    All ISP's track you in one way or another and are required by law to provide that information in a subpoena.
    NOT unless they have a search warrant first!

    Comcast has admittedly been doing this WITHOUT our knowledge.

    Have you been following my PayPal threads? Do you understand what this means and how it all ties in?

    It doesn't matter how secure PayPal is because Inktomi is capturing ALL of our data...including creditcard numbers and passwords. so it doesn't matter how secure anything claims to be because Inktomi is the weak link here.....Inktomi doesn't have to abide by the same standards that PayPal does or any other banking service which means a hacker doesn't have to break into PayPals database...all they have to do is to get into Inktomi's database. Since Inktomi is NOT a bank...they don't care for the info they store like one either, meaning they aren't responsible if the info gets stolen and they don't have to have the same security infrastructure as a bank or any other online retailer?

    This is completely out of control!

    HOW SECURE IS INKTOMI WITH OUR INFO????

    What safeguards has Inktomi implemented to keep all this captured data safe!!!

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  10. #10
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    If WE, and what I mean by We as an internet community discontinue our broadband service from our ISP's for just a month or more it would bring them to their knees financially.

    This would be the only way to counteract them. Might force them to reconstruct there Terms of Use and at best, force the ISP's to provide what they state.

    Or maybe lobbying congress to investigate these ISP's.

    Just a thought.
    >>Cult Master of International Affairs<<

  11. #11
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    Attention everyone in Michigan! This is against the law

    This is on Michigan Attorney Generals site:

    Your legal rights

    Surreptitious tracking of consumers' browsing behavior is not legal under Michigan law. The Michigan Consumer Protection Act generally applies to a wide range of transactions and practices affecting consumers. While there are over 30 different unfair practices that are prohibited under the Act, the central theme is that businesses are required to deal fairly and honestly with consumers. This includes a duty on the part of businesses to disclose important aspects of a transaction that are not reasonably obvious to consumers. For example, a tire store is required to tell a consumer that tires advertised at a certain price are used instead of new, and a sweepstakes promoter must disclose to consumers that no purchase is necessary to enter the contest and explain how to enter the drawing without buying a product or service.

    In the context of online privacy, the fact that consumers' browsing behavior is being monitored by unfamiliar third parties for unknown reasons to be a material fact to consumers. Furthermore, this fact is not something that a consumer could reasonably be expected to know. For this reason, web sites that interact with Michigan consumers are required to disclose tracking of consumers' online activity.

    The Attorney General's office has issued Notices of Intended Action to a number of companies that operate commercial web sites warning these companies that lawsuits may follow unless the web sites take steps to tell consumers that they are being tracked by third parties.

    Read under Internet
    »www.ag.state.mi.us/index.asp


    I pulled this from another sites posting and confirmed it to be true. Comcast is operating illegally.

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  12. #12
    Best In Show Girls Noevo's Avatar
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    This is definetly a concern to me!!!

    Excerpt from the article that pretty much says it all

    "The company that sold Comcast the technology acknowledged the cable company is collecting too much information.

    ``It's not needed,'' said Steve Russell, a vice president for Inktomi Corp. Russell said Inktomi's software also records other information from Comcast subscribers, such as passwords for Web sites and credit-card numbers under limited circumstances.

    Russell discounted privacy concerns, saying engineers are using the information to improve Comcast performance.

    Two of the nation's largest Internet providers, America Online and EarthLink, said they do not track the Web browsing of their combined 35 million subscribers.
    "


    *starts composing another complaint to the AG's office*

  13. #13
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    I gotta tell ya...for the first time in years, I'm actually worried about something. This is really bothering me. How can any transaction be safe if it is being intercepted and stored?

    So when I logon to my banks website...and conduct business, it isn't secure due to the fact that everything is being recorded by Comcast. So in effect, if a hacker wanted to, all he would have to do is overcome the security of Comcast which is alot less secure than my bank correct?

    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

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    Criminal Master Mind ExarKun's Avatar
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    Re: It's Official!!! Comcast has comfirmed they are tracking all users!

    Originally posted by UOD
    I just saw it on TechLive...they have confirmed that they are tracking everybody for purposes of rebuilding their network and to top it off....all the information can be used in a subpoena!

    brb when I can get a few links on this story!

    http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGAMFFCEMXC.html

    Anyone know of a way to defeat this?
    Hey no stealing news from the Tampabay area, thats my job to do that...
    There Is only the Here and The Now, If you forget about that You might as well be Dead!

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    Flip Chip Qwijib0's Avatar
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    Originally posted by UOD
    I gotta tell ya...for the first time in years, I'm actually worried about something. This is really bothering me. How can any transaction be safe if it is being intercepted and stored?

    So when I logon to my banks website...and conduct business, it isn't secure due to the fact that everything is being recorded by Comcast. So in effect, if a hacker wanted to, all he would have to do is overcome the security of Comcast which is alot less secure than my bank correct?
    They can capture all the packets they want. but as long as your browser is using 128bit encryption (required for all the banking sites), they'd need to decrypt the packets, first, and that would take more than a lifetime. Essentially all they could see is the URL. However, if they are indeed capturing ALL packets, then you'd need to encrypt anything toy'l like to keep private (email, chat clients....ect)
    If your browser can't read unicode, you should probably switch!

  16. #16
    Criminal Master Mind ExarKun's Avatar
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    Heres Road Runners Privacy Stuff

    12. Privacy.

    (a) Subscriber's privacy interests, including Subscriber's ability to limit disclosure of certain information to third parties, are addressed by, among other laws, the Federal Cable Communications Act (the "Cable Act") and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Information that may be disclosed in accordance with applicable laws, including information relating to personally identifiable information, is described in the Time Warner Cable And Affiliated ISPs Subscriber Privacy Notice (the “Privacy Notice”) delivered to Subscriber by Operator, which is incorporated herein by reference. Subscriber acknowledges receipt of the Privacy Notice.

    (b) As more fully described in the Privacy Notice, each of Road Runner and Operator may collect (whether automatically or otherwise) and share (with each other and with other Time Warner Cable entities) information of the type described in the Privacy Notice (some of which may be deemed personally identifiable information as that term is used in the Cable Act) relating to Subscriber that Road Runner and/or Operator may acquire as a result of the provision of the Road Runner Service. Subscriber acknowledges that it has expressly consented in the Operator Terms to the collection by, and sharing between, Operator and Road Runner and other Time Warner Cable entities of such information.

    (c) In addition to actions and disclosures specifically authorized by law or statute or authorized elsewhere in this Agreement, Road Runner shall have the right (except where prohibited by law notwithstanding Subscriber's consent), but not the obligation, to monitor content on the Road Runner Service and to disclose any information to protect its rights, property and/or operations, and where circumstances suggest that individual or public safety is in peril. Subscriber hereby consents to such actions or disclosures.
    There Is only the Here and The Now, If you forget about that You might as well be Dead!

  17. #17
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    Symaptico's in Nova Scotia

    What information of yours does the SLI Network collect?

    The goal of the SLI Network is to be your premier destination on the Internet by providing you with the information, services and product offerings ("Products and Services") that are most relevant to you. To achieve this goal, the SLI Network needs to collect information to understand what differentiates you from its other unique users. We collect two types of information, "anonymous information" and "personal information".

    Anonymous information refers to information that is not about an identifiable individual. Each time a visitor comes to a SLI Network site, SLI may collect information that is necessary to improve the overall quality of the visitor's online experience. SLI may collect computer and connection information such as the visitor's IP address (e.g., whether the user is logged on from a .ca, .com, .gov or .edu domain), referral data (e.g., the address of the last URL a user visited prior to clicking through to a SLI Network site), and browser and platform type (e.g., a Netscape browser on a Macintosh platform). SLI also collects aggregate search terms from its search services for internal reporting and targeted advertising. SLI collects this user information for purposes of product monitoring, product improvement, and targeted advertising.

    In addition to this anonymous information, SLI may also collect information that is about an identifiable individual ("personal information"). Personal information includes information that tells us specifically who you are, such as your name and postal code. Wherever and whenever SLI collects personal information we make an effort to include a link to this Privacy Policy on that page. If the page does not contain the SLI Network branding bar or if it displays or contains a link to a privacy policy or to terms and conditions of an entity other than SLI then, except as otherwise provided herein, this Privacy Policy does not apply and the privacy practices of the entity that operates such site will apply.

    SLI collects personal information in the following ways from different parts of the SLI Network:


    Personal information is gathered when you voluntarily register with one or several of the SLI Network sites. If you choose to register you may provide SLI with your name, postal code, email address, birth date, gender and other information. While not all of this information is required, the more information you volunteer (and the more accurate it is), the better we are able to customize your experience. Once you register you are given a SLI Network ID and are able to take full advantage of the many offerings over the SLI Network, including personalization services. For example, your SLI Network ID is used to offer you customized news, sports scores, weather reports, horoscopes and other customized information. The number and variety of useful services the SLI Network provides continues to grow and so will your ability to make use of these services if you choose to register for them. If you choose not to provide the requested information, the SLI Network may not be able to offer you some of the personalized services that depend on this type of information to function. However to register, you still have the option of providing only the minimum necessary information.


    In addition to registration for various services on the SLI Network, SLI may ask you for personal information at other times, including certain necessary information when you enter a sweepstakes, contest or promotion offered at an SLI Network site, or request, subscribe for or purchase a product or service through the SLI Network.


    If you contact the SLI Network, we may keep a record of that correspondence. We do not collect any email addresses of those who communicate with the SLI Network via email. We use the information provided only so that we may respond to the email.


    More...

    How can you access, edit or delete your information?

    The SLI Network provides its registered users the ability to access and edit the personal information in their user profiles. Currently, to access and edit your personal information, you have to go to the specific SLI Network site where you registered. SLI also offers all users who have volunteered any personal information to SLI the opportunity to review the information provided and to rectify any inaccuracies. Please contact our Privacy Site Coordinator at privacy1@sympatico.ca
    >>Cult Master of International Affairs<<

  18. #18
    Best In Show Girls Noevo's Avatar
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    Wow, they are allegedly backing off quick on this one. Maybe just trying to say the right thing? Heres an excerpt from another article and the link follows.

    "I'm predicting that this latest controversy is going to result in a lot of cancellations. I'm getting a regular stream of e-mail from enraged customers who say they would rather be stuck with dial-up than deal with Comcast.
    Here's what we have found out about this new network so far:

    It's slower. Comcast has capped downloading (receiving) streams on its new network at rates as much as 50 percent lower than what customers of the old system were receiving.

    It limits what users can do. The new network won't let you transfer a file larger than 3 Mb. It used to be 5Mb. That means you can't send some MP3 music files or many video files or even a scrapbook of digital pictures to grandma.

    You can't send e-mail to a group of more than 40 people. If you want to send a notice to members of a club, a church choir, a school class or have a group of family members you have to break it up into smaller e-mails.

    You can't use your Comcast connection to connect to a Virtual Private Network at your office computer, something increasingly important to telecommuters and work-at-home folks.

    There's a limited amount of access to the Net's popular newsgroups. First, Comcast totally eliminated newsgroup access. Later, it was modified to use a service from a company called Giganews. But there's now a 1GB of newsgroup data. But under the old Road Runner service, newsgroup access was unlimited.

    "

    http://www.pcmike.com/Journal/comcast.html

  19. #19
    Maneater JawZ's Avatar
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    It's over...they have backed down!


    ...formerly the omnipotent UOD

  20. #20
    ****** HalfLifer's Avatar
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    Thanks for the good reading UOD.
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