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Thread: WinXP Steals Your Bandwidth

  1. #1
    Banned BoGGy's Avatar
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    WinXP Steals Your Bandwidth

    Originally posted by garbage
    WinXP Steals Your Bandwidth: http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/23090.html

    This will help increase your bandwidth for any network connection.

    1. Make sure your logged on as actually "Administrator". do not log on with any account that just has administrator privileges. To log in as an administrator:
    -click on start->logoff->logoff
    -in the logon screen hold Ctrl+Alt+Del.
    -in the user field type 'Administrator' <-case sensitive.
    -in the password field type the password for the administrator (if you don't have one leave blank)
    -press ok

    2. Start - run - type gpedit.msc
    3. Expand the "local computer policy" branch
    4. Expand the "administrative templates" branch
    5. Expand the "network branch"
    6. Highlight the "QoS Packet Scheduler" in left window
    7. In right window double click the "limit reservable bandwidth" setting
    8. On setting tab check the "enabled" item
    9. Where it says "Bandwidth limit %" change it to read 0-- Click apply, OK, exit gpedit.msc
    10. Go to your Network connections (start->my computer->my network connection-> view network connections). Right click on your connection, choose properties then under the General or the Networking tab (where it lists your protocols) make sure QoS packet scheduler is enabled.
    11. Reboot , now you are all done.

    This is more of a "counter what XP does" thing. In other words, XP seems to want to reserve 20% of the bandwidth for itself even with QoS disabled. So why not use it to your advantage. To demonstrate the problem, start up a big download from a server with an FTP client. Try to find a server that doesn't max out your bandwidth. In this case you want a slow to medium speed server to demonstrate this. Let it run for a couple of minutes to get stable. The start up another download from the same server with another instance of your FTP client. You will notice that the available bandwidth is now being fought over and one of the clients download will be very slow or both will slow down when they should both be using the available bandwidth. Using this "tweak" both clients will have a fair share of the bandwidth and will not fight over the bandwidth.

    Copyright 2001 TweakXP.com

  2. #2
    Banned CompGeek83's Avatar
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    Re: WinXP Steals Your Bandwidth

    Originally posted by BoGGy
    i tried that yesterday, havent been able to notice any differences yet though

  3. #3
    Regular Member MtCableman's Avatar
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    My WIN XP Pro isn't even configured for the "default" 20%. It isn't limiting anything. Looks like a dead end for me. I don't want to enable it and lower it to zero. Since when it isn't enabled or configured it is at zero!
    Closed course and Professional user.
    Don't try this at Home!

  4. #4
    Banned BoGGy's Avatar
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    its set to 20% if its disabled

  5. #5
    no just becuz it says it disabled it actulay enable microsoft dont want you to know about it you actualy need to clik on enable then taek alook at the % its at its the same way on mine it disabled but windows has configured it hardcore in system u need to do what first post tells you to disable it

  6. #6
    Ohh Hell yeah.. Sava700's Avatar
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    this thread is 6 years OLD!!!

  7. #7
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    I'm 11 days behind this thread, but cableguy was resurrecting quite a few 6 year old threads on 7/18.

    He should also use a little more punctuation.
    3Mbps/386Kbps DSL PPPoA via local phone company, Speedstream modem/wireless.

  8. #8
    How do I run gpedit.msc when I can't find it or i'm just getting a notice that it aint on my computer.

  9. #9
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    start button >run>gpedit.msc

    The 20% bandwidth that is "stolen" as far as I am aware is not stolen it only comes into play when you are downloading a microsoft update. It is so you can carry on browsing the internet with no discernable difference to your speed. So if you are not updating it does not come into play. If you set it to 0 then a big update WILL affect your browsing.
    H.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by healvis View Post
    start button >run>gpedit.msc

    The 20% bandwidth that is "stolen" as far as I am aware is not stolen it only comes into play when you are downloading a microsoft update. It is so you can carry on browsing the internet with no discernable difference to your speed. So if you are not updating it does not come into play. If you set it to 0 then a big update WILL affect your browsing.
    H.
    I guess this is not installed on my computer because it can't find it for some reason. Does anyone have an idea if this setting does actually work, yet i'm really having problems with the internet connection I have.

  11. #11
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    I don't know what version of Windows you are running, but if it is Windows
    XP Home, gpedit.msc will not be available in your system...

  12. #12
    thanks for letting me know, I have home edition.

  13. #13
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    milespower,

    I should have been more forthcoming with information in my previous post, please read on.

    In Windows XP Home you can still set QoS to '0' by following the instructions below, but if you are not used to changing things directly in the registry, I suggest you don't do it.

    If you still want to go ahead and give it a try, make a backup of your registry before you change anything in it so you can always go back to the original one if a mistake is made.

    1. Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe).

    2. Go to the following key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Psched

    3. On the right-hand pane you should see this entry: NonBestEffortLimit.

    4. double-left-click it and type 0 (zero) in the Value Data field, click OK.

    5. Go to your Network connections (start->my computer->my network connection-> view network connections). Right-click on your connection, choose properties then under the General or the Networking tab (where it lists your protocols) make sure QoS packet scheduler is enabled.

    6. Quit Registry Editor, and restart the computer for changes to take effect.

    I can almost be certain that once you restart your computer, you will not notice any difference at all.

    From Microsoft:

    "Clarification about the use of QoS in end computers that are running Windows XP.

    As in Windows 2000, programs can take advantage of QoS through the QoS APIs in Windows XP. One hundred percent of the network bandwidth is available to be shared by all programs unless a program specifically requests priority bandwidth. This “reserved” bandwidth is still available to other programs unless the requesting program is sending data. By default, programs can reserve up to an aggregate bandwidth of 20 percent of the underlying link speed on each interface on an end computer. If the program that reserved the bandwidth is not sending sufficient data to use it, the unused part of the reserved bandwidth is available for other data flows on the same host"


    Last edited by Pilatus; 07-30-07 at 08:55 PM. Reason: BIG typos, probably more to come...

  14. #14
    Psched is not in the registry, i only see IPsec if that's what it is.

  15. #15
    Junior Member p0p3y31's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milesprower View Post
    How do I run gpedit.msc when I can't find it or i'm just getting a notice that it aint on my computer.
    must be logged in as admin

  16. #16
    Junior Member p0p3y31's Avatar
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    hold on i think i got egg on my face

  17. #17
    Sorry that I haven't been around folks for quite awhile just got out of some serious surgery.

    About the QoS and QoS aware programs out there:

    As much as I hate to tell you this, there are very few applications out there that actually use QoS through Microsoft's implementation, most the programs that use them are for high speed database connectivity and other applications of the like.

    By default the reason why your XP is slow over the network is not because of the QoS setting, as it should be set to disable for normal users and gamers, granted the QoS service in Windows should not be confused with QoS on your modems and routers, those are two completely different protocols and operate differently.

    Reason why you computer is slow over the Internet, lots of things can cause that. There are several services under "services.msc" to be entered at the START menu run command that don't need to be running the majority of the time.

    Here are some services that don't need to be running in order for you to access the Internet:

    Background Intelligence Transfer Service (BITS)
    This is used in conjunction with the Automatic Update services for Microsoft,
    I have this shut off because it eats up memory, bandwidth, and is not needed the majority of the time. I also have automatic updates shut off, simply because I do not trust the "one patch fixes all algorithm Microsoft has set up for us, don't like the loss of control of my computers for one, not knowing what in the heck they are attempting to install on the computer without my knowledge and authorization".

    Automatic Updates:
    As I said before I disable this, I pick what I want to update and when I want to do it.

    QoS RSVP:
    Shut off because the majority of the applications that includes games do not use the Microsoft implementation of this service, they have their own way of dealing with latency and bandwidth usage.

    Infact, the majority of the services in services.msc don't need to be running in order for your computer to work, if you are interested in which ones are needed and which are optional (sometimes a security risk) just ask me, I will send you to a site so you can see the absolute necessities. The less your computer needs to cycle through in services and applications running in the foreground or background the faster your computer will be, you will also notice less activity over the network when you are idling.

    The only time you want to modify the setting for QoS RSVP in Windows XP Professional or higher is when your servers are infact running this protocol as well and the computers over the VLANs and VWANs are using that service as well, that is only time you should enable that particular service, having likewise configurtions on all servers and client workstations, other than that, it is just a waste of processor time, memory, and bandwidth.

    If you are trying to squeeze out every bit of download speed out of your pipe to the Internet, look up CFOS bandwidth shaping software for Cable / xDSL users, by changing the upload speed slightly (limiting it) you can actually get better download speed and better latency (much lower) assuming it's just a software problem you have and not a hardware related problem.

    If you want to use QoS on your routers but don't know how to use or configure it, just ask.

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