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Thread: Latency packets

  1. #1
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    Latency packets

    Hi. Is it possible to somehow configure the delay of tcp packets?

  2. #2
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    No, delay for each "hop" between routers is increased by a minimum of 1 (one millisecond), and there is always some transmission delay you can't avoid. Just going thousand miles over fiber optic cables would typically add 20ms of delay.
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  3. #3
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    I mean, is it possible to manage this delay. It is not necessary to lower it, is it possible to raise it somehow? Increase packet latency and not ping, that is, without ping changes?

  4. #4
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    This seems to be done by the tcpackfrequency registry key, something similar

  5. #5
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    ping is the same as latency, same as rtt. It is a measurement of round-trip time of packets.

    You can set certain parameters on your end, but generally TCP/IP parameters are negotiated during the initial connection between client and server, during the "TCP Handshake". Some games also use UDP protocol for certain streams, rather than TCP, so that's important to know as well.

    Other than that, larger packets (up to 1500 bytes) can have slightly higher latency than small 500-byte packets for example, but the difference is only a couple of ms, if any, so it is negligible.

    Once packets leave your end, they are like mailed letters with origin/destination IP address and you don't have much control of the path they take to reach their destination. Some packets may actually travel on a slightly different path depending on current conditions. Depending on how congested the routers are in that path at that moment, packets may be delayed differently.
    Linux is user friendly, it's just picky about its friends...
    Disclaimer: Please use caution when opening messages, my grasp on reality may have shaken loose during transmission (going on rusty memory circuits). I also eat whatever crayons are put in front of me.
    ๑۩۞۩๑

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