Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
Humby, That doesn't sound right, where were they located? Antarctica?

The boiling point for propane (propane is an LPG) is -44 F (same with C as that is when F & C are the same), so as long as it is above -45 F it will vaporize... (That is minus 45 degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius, same temp basically...) They probably had water in tank or a bad regulator, I mean physics is physics...

IOW, either whoever first filled tank didn't properly purge it, or contaminated propane was put in it or the regular went bad, seriously...



EDIT- tank must be properly purged the 1st time it is filled to remove water/condensate/moisture/humidity from the air that was in the tank. Fresh water freezes at 32F/0C. The lines must also be purged of air for same reason...

Also, depending upon the area, butane is sometimes mixed in with propane. Butane has a boiling point of about 30F, so that could have been the problem. Tank could have been filled with a high mixture of butane which could allow the butane in lines to freeze. This is more common in areas that typically do not experience a lot of temps below 30F, quite possibly your area. Call the company and ask if they use butane or a propane/butane mixture... They may need to contact their supplier for an accurate answer...

The LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) family (light hydrocarbons) consists of both propane and butane. Butane is typically cheaper than propane...

For tanks stored outside, specifying propane is the better choice and best to ask before they fill. I hope that this helps...
It does, and thank you Ken.

I'll call my buddy now and pass this on.