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Thread: Dual-homed Cable Connection

  1. #1
    Aeric67
    Guest

    Post Dual-homed Cable Connection

    This may not be well thought out, but I will do a brain dump of my questions anyway.

    As a current subscriber to AT&T@Home, I recently began paying them more money per month in return for having two IP addresses instead of only one (I know, silly isn't it). Anyway, the whole purpose behind this was to make some Internet applications and games easier to handle for my three networked computers. Some examples are MSN Messenger, MS Game Voice, MS Gaming Zone games, NetMeeting, etc. etc., you get the pattern. I really only use two of those three computers, the extra one is merely my gateway/firewall/NAT router.

    This gateway, of course, is connected directly to the cable modem with NAT software on that interface (Winroute Pro, in case you are familiar). The other network card on this machine is connected to the private LAN. This computer has Windows 2000 on it.

    The two other computers sit inside the private LAN.

    Now, the above was the config that works fairly well with one public IP address. Now that I have two addresses, is it possible to DUAL HOME the gateway computer so that it has two NICs attached to the cable modem (using a hub), each with separate IP addresses. Then, with Winroute (or other firewall software if necessary), create port mappings from each of the IP addresses to each of the two computers inside the private LAN...

    Let me paint the picture as follows (no real IP data, just examples):

    Computer #1 (gateway computer)
    NIC 1 (PUBLIC) 65.0.0.1 (hubbed to cable modem)
    NIC 2 (PUBLIC) 65.0.0.2 (hubbed to cable modem)
    NIC 3 (PRIVATE) 192.168.0.1

    Computer #2
    NIC 1 (PRIVATE) 192.168.0.2

    Computer #3
    NIC 1 (PRIVATE) 192.168.0.3

    I then proceed to map my desired ports from Computer #1's NIC 1 to Computer #2's NIC 1. I would also map my desired ports from Computer #1's NIC 2 to Computer #3's NIC 1. This way, I have a firewall between the two private computers and the Internet for security, but have all the desired ports from two individual public IP addresses routed to each of the computers. Make sense?

    When I attempted this, I was met with not being able to have multiple COMPUTER NAMES (host names) on a single computer so that I would not be assigned my proper AT&T@Home IP address by DHCP. Do I need to use Linux or something else? Or maybe I just need to assign the correct IPs statically to each of the PUBLIC NICs on Computer #1. While that might work, I wanted to do it the "right way" (DHCP way) in case AT&T@Home decides to change my IP assignments.

    Anyway, for now, I just have Computer #2 connected to the cable modem directly with a personal firewall installed to take advantage of that extra IP. Of course, Computer #1 on the other IP address still acts as the NAT router/firewall for Computer #3. This works fine, but it's not the way I wanted to do it

    Any ideas?

    PS: I re-read this and it sounds all over the place... hope you can understand what I am talking about.

    ------------------
    Aeric
    -----
    "Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear -- not absence of fear."

  2. #2
    glc1
    Guest

    Post

    There is no point in having multiple routable IPs w/a server/gateway. Just save yourself some money and ditch the extra IPs and setup a server. You can protect yourself by unbinding File and Printer Sharing, and Client for MS Networks from TCP/IP on the clients and on the modem's NIC. Use NetBEUI as the LAN protocol and bind these two items to it. You can also use firewall software.

    [This message has been edited by glc1 (edited 12-19-2000).]

  3. #3
    Aeric67
    Guest

    Post

    But the point here is to have two public IP addresses so the two internal computers can be addressed individually from the outside... but only go through a single firewall computer.

    Oh nevermind, it really isn't a big deal

    ------------------
    Aeric
    -----
    "Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear -- not absence of fear."

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