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  1. #1
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    would anyone

    Be able to direct me as to what I can do with my modem and TV issues? I've had it.

    Is there a way to format/post the modem signal page without it looking like a mess here?

  2. #2
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    You can take a screenshot (CTRL+PrintScr), then attach the image...

    Alternatively, just post the relevant text, like Downstream power, upstream power, SNR, etc.

  3. #3
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    5 Locked QAM256 5 681000000 Hz -3.7 dBmV 40.2 dB 12 0
    8 Locked QAM256 8 699000000 Hz -3.9 dBmV 40.1 dB 1457 293
    9 Locked QAM256 9 705000000 Hz -4.1 dBmV 39.9 dB 67075 78689
    10 Locked QAM256 10 711000000 Hz -4.4 dBmV 39.7 dB 12008 22333

    Curious as to what the h*** is going on at 699 Hz, 705 Hz, & 711 Hz?

    681 Hz looks ok (No uncorrectables)
    Last edited by CableDude; 04-30-17 at 08:42 AM.

  4. #4
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    When your modem negotiates with the headend, it picks 4 channels to use (in your case). The downstream power has to ideally be between -8 and +8dBmV, SNR higher than 30, both of them are well within specs in your case.

    The uncorrectables on Ch 9/10 look too high, but I am not sure what is acceptable tbh, maybe some tech will chime in. Could be some noise on your coax line? Is the modem hooked up directly to the outside box, without splitters in between ? Maybe a good idea to get your Cable Co. to take a look, what issues are you experiencing with TV/net ?

  5. #5
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    When your modem negotiates with the headend, it picks 4 channels to use (in your case).
    Actually, it is picking up 16 down & 4 up. I only posted the 4 down that stood out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    The downstream power has to ideally be between -8 and +8dBmV, SNR higher than 30, both of them are well within specs in your case.
    I'd like to be right at 0 on those power levels, but that ain't going to happen.


    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    The uncorrectables on Ch 9/10 look too high, but I am not sure what is acceptable tbh, maybe some tech will chime in. Could be some noise on your coax line? Is the modem hooked up directly to the outside box, without splitters in between ? Maybe a good idea to get your Cable Co. to take a look, what issues are you experiencing with TV/net ?
    That was one month uptime. I rebooted today. Agree with you on noise in the line.

    Line from pedestal comes in to house to amp then Modem is on a splitter

    Internet is fine from what I can tell (I don't game nor use nearly the bandwidth I used to use years ago). TV pixelates/audio drops out.

    Until someone can convince me differently, I think a neighbor is causing me problems.

    TWC was/is never any help with the TV side. The maintenance techs are cool, however.



    Those 705 & 711 are AT&T LTE (from what I understand)


    Problem is.....

    I don't have AT&T so how is this interference getting in?

  6. #6
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    Some errors are normal, I just seem to have on average about 10 times less than what you are getting on those two channels. Keep in mind these frequencies are over the coax cable, so they are not supposed to be leaking out and mixing with radio frequencies like LTE at all. The usual suspects where interference can come in is where there is no shield (or shielding is bad), i.e. cable ends, coax outlets, etc.

    Interference can be from lose connections, kinked cables, older cables (i.e. RG59 vs. the newer RG6), unterminated lose coax cable ends, lousy splitters, even that amplifier you have (it amplifies both signal and noise equally, even though amplification power varies somewhat with frequency).

  7. #7
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Some errors are normal, I just seem to have on average about 10 times less than what you are getting on those two channels. Keep in mind these frequencies are over the coax cable, so they are not supposed to be leaking out and mixing with radio frequencies like LTE at all. The usual suspects where interference can come in is where there is no shield (or shielding is bad), i.e. cable ends, coax outlets, etc.

    Interference can be from lose connections, kinked cables, older cables (i.e. RG59 vs. the newer RG6), unterminated lose coax cable ends, lousy splitters, even that amplifier you have (it amplifies both signal and noise equally, even though amplification power varies somewhat with frequency).
    I hear you Boss.

    I'm thinking of switching back to the old amp (the current is Antronix VRA900B) obviously when TWC switched this last year it_didn't_solve anything.

    Also, IF I were to rewire the entire home, who should I get to do it?

    Honestly, the more I think about it. I would be surprised it the coax from the pedestal inside the house is damaged. maybe just enough to cause problems, but not enough to completely lose service.

  8. #8
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    I would just try to pinpoint the source of the problem before you decide on a full rewire.

    If possible, run a straight cable without splitters from the outside box to the cable modem (or TV) and see if there is an obvious difference in the signal, that would tell you if it's the wiring.

    Remove the amp and see what your signal at the modem looks like ? You can even leave the amp only on the TV side, after the split if the TV signal needs it. It is usually a bad idea for a cable modem to go through an amp, they are often noisy, esp. on the upstream.

    Another option is substituting a splitter with a tap (it loses most of the signal on one output leg, and almost none on the other leg). It is often used to keep the cleaner output to the cable modem, and incur more loss on the TV out leg. You can then amplify the TV signal if needed, but that would keep the cable modem signal much cleaner.

    At least the above gives you some options to balance the signal between the cable modem and the TV side.

  9. #9
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    I would just try to pinpoint the source of the problem before you decide on a full rewire.
    Agreed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    If possible, run a straight cable without splitters from the outside box to the cable modem (or TV) and see if there is an obvious difference in the signal, that would tell you if it's the wiring.
    I'll look at this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Remove the amp and see what your signal at the modem looks like ? You can even leave the amp only on the TV side, after the split if the TV signal needs it. It is usually a bad idea for a cable modem to go through an amp, they are often noisy, esp. on the upstream.
    I often wonder WHY I need this amp! They installed one inside back in 2008 and to this day I have no reason why and can never get a clear answer! In 1996 I didn't need it, I didn't have high speed internet until 2000 and didn't need it then.

    The last TWC tech that came out was INSISTED on installing a 4 way splitter in place of the amp. Duh I needed 5 (sometimes six TV's hooked up) so he went with the 8 port amp again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Another option is substituting a splitter with a tap (it loses most of the signal on one output leg, and almost none on the other leg). It is often used to keep the cleaner output to the cable modem, and incur more loss on the TV out leg. You can then amplify the TV signal if needed, but that would keep the cable modem signal much cleaner.
    I'll look at that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    At least the above gives you some options to balance the signal between the cable modem and the TV side.


    Think want I'm going to do today (or tomorrow) is get that modem (and TV-they are in the same room) off that amp. So incoming coax gets a two way splitter. 1 end goes for the Modem/TV (which is already split in the room) and the other end goes to the amp.

    Why didn't the say Keep the modem off the amp? They are the techs, I'm not. and this isn't the first time I have read this (keeping the modem off the amp)


    Oh and Food Network pixelated/froze/lost audio yesterday morning.

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