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Thread: Will a Powerline Adapter work for fighting games?

  1. #1

    Will a Powerline Adapter work for fighting games?

    We have a decent router which unfortunately is placed too far away from my room, so using an ethernet cable to connect to my console isn't ideal. Being particularly sensitive to frames, Fighting games should be played wired, so the current wireless condition is holding both players back with the occasional random lag spike appearing.

    A friend recommended buying a Powerline Adapter to remedy the problem. However, will the connection be equally stable as connecting directly to the router? Will the powerline adapter have a negative effect on the ping and upload speed?
    Are some powerline brands better for fighting games than others or does it all depend on the power lines in your home?

    I thought the idea of a powerline adapter to be great but want to be sure it is feasable to use for the purpose of fighting games before making the purchase.

    This Wikipedia page explains the concept: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power-line_communication

    Any personal experiences here on the forum or just theoretical?

    Thanks everyone
    Last edited by Gummihorse; 06-15-16 at 04:34 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Yup, MUCH better than wireless.
    I can tell you from personal experience...I used one myself for years.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
    I can tell you from personal experience...I used one myself for years.
    May I ask if your response is specifically related to fighting games? Meaning we can confidently use the Powerline Adapter without having to worry if hooking up directly through ethernet cable is better?

    So for this sounds like great news to me. Will check a few out at the local store over the weekend

  4. #4
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    Make sure to get good brand adapters and they should work well. I remember some had problems automatically disconnecting at times, etc. It also depends on the age/quality of your AC wiring I imagine.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    I remember some had problems automatically disconnecting at times, etc.
    Hi Philip. Thanks for the advice. I had a look in some of the local stores this weekend where they had multiple brands to choose from. I ended up not being able to decide on what to buy... Do you remember which brands were particularly good and which ones to avoid for fighting games? Was there an article you read somewhere?

  6. #6
    Good news for us

    Sister's boyfriend had a Powerline Adapter we could borrow in order to test if it worked. It absolutely did the trick! There was one time that we experienced a disconnect like you mentioned, but we used it for many hours and were very pleased
    I will buy a newer, more updated version of the adapter we testet. Apparently it accepts faster speeds. Yey!

  7. #7
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gummihorse View Post
    May I ask if your response is specifically related to fighting games? Meaning we can confidently use the Powerline Adapter without having to worry if hooking up directly through ethernet cable is better?
    First person shooters...back then, it was the Battlefield series. When we moved to a new house, I had my wireless router in the basement, and my gaming rig up on the second floor, running wireless. Casual usage was fine, but when I'd fire up Battlefield 1942 (or other versions)...and get into some parts of the game that needed a tight connection..such as when flying and in a dogfight...the wireless signal couldn't keep up. Example...when on wireless, I'd go into some powerdive.....the screen would often pause/hang..and then a couple of seconds later it would come back, but I'd be a crumpled pile of wreckage because I crashed in the ground.

    So I picked up the powerline bridges...problem gone! Parts of games that needed low latency, high refresh rates...suffered under wireless.
    The powerline bridge was as good as running ethernet cable, as far as my online gaming was concerned.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
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  8. #8
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    I've seen some older TP-links lose the connection at times. If you have some type of electrical noise on the same breaker as the powerline adapters you may run into problems, otherwise they're great, especially the newer variants.

  9. #9
    So I bought a newer model that also came with a wireless function and have been using the adapter throughout the weekend. It's been truly great for gaming, and due to the fact that it came with two ethernet outputs, I could connect both consoles directly. I did not run into disconnection problems while playing the fighting games but did notice that we were thrown off the internet while watching streaming services. The Xbox One then took a long time before it was able to reconnect wired but if we pulled out the ethernet cable from the console, the xbox would luckily connect to the wireless network immediately. This way we could faster get back into action and later reconnect the wired ethernet cable when time allowed.

    We are having some problems using the wirelss function on the Powerline Adapter because our laptops and consoles won't accept the password that is written on the back of the adapter. We will ask for help from customer support on this.

    Anyway, was a great purchase and definitely made life easier

  10. #10
    So after being satisfied with the Powerline Adapter, I recommended my friend to purchase the same device. He does not want to spend additional money on buying the version that comes with wireless, thus asked me if it is possible to connect a wireless router to the Powerline Adapter that is in the living room. I assumed it would work fine but could not give an opinion on quality loss. The manual to my current router states that it should be connected directly into the modem but does not consider the possible use of a Powerline Adapter in between.

    Should this be fine without worrying about degrading the wireless quality?

  11. #11
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    If you connect a wireless router to the current LAN (to the Powerline adapter as well), you should configure/connect the router as an access point, there is info on how to do that on the main site here: http://www.speedguide.net/articles/h...ess-point-2556

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    If you connect a wireless router to the current LAN (to the Powerline adapter as well), you should configure/connect the router as an access point, there is info on how to do that on the main site here: http://www.speedguide.net/articles/h...ess-point-2556
    Was a little overwhelming at first glance but will definitely recommend my friend to follow your solution Right now, with my miniscule amount of knowledge, I have to click on all the words that are blue to learn more about their functions, haha. Anyway, good to know that an access point is the best path to follow in contrast to my suggestion.

  13. #13
    Administrator Philip's Avatar
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    When setup as an access point, you only use the "LAN"side of the router. This allows for devices on both sides (wired/wireless) to be on the same network in essence simplifying the role of the router, eliminating "routing" between different networks.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    When setup as an access point, you only use the "LAN"side of the router. This allows for devices on both sides (wired/wireless) to be on the same network in essence simplifying the role of the router, eliminating "routing" between different networks.
    Got it working! Thanks for the clarification.

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