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Thread: Buying a drill

  1. #1
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    Buying a drill

    Looking to buy a drill. I would like the bit to hold on to a screw with ease. I want to be able to push the screww into plywood with in seconds. What type of specs should i be looking for to accomplish this?

    Also, I prefer the drill to be lite in weight.

    thx

  2. #2
    resident Humboldt's Avatar
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    Maybe this will help: http://www.which.co.uk/home-and-gard...lectric-drill/
    http://www.ebay.com/gds/Cordless-Dri...7630241/g.html
    http://cordless-drill-review.toptenreviews.com/

    Always been happy with DeWalt ("contractor" line from B&D). Buddy of mine from jr. high designed their torture test.


    I'd think the torque options would be something you'd be most concerned with.

  3. #3
    resident plumber Mark's Avatar
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    what you want is a impact driver, i use makita, they last about the longest for the money IMO................

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-18...29xZygZ1z140i3

  4. #4
    SG Enthusiast cybotron r_9's Avatar
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    what Mark said, I bought the Rigid set and love it, I don't use it near as much as Mark does though.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-18...9601/203810442

  5. #5
    resident plumber Mark's Avatar
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    That rigid set is nice too
    4930K@4.3~32GBGskill~asusX79deluxe~r9-280x~240GB-SSD-OS drive~500GB-SSD-scratch~240GB-SSD-thrash~2TB storage~Windows 7 pro
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    SG MVP Lefty's Avatar
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    Dewalt fan here too.

  7. #7
    Elite Member TonyT's Avatar
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    For a small amount of plywood, i.e. 1 sheet or less, a cordless impact driver is good. For production work, as in installing multiple sheets of plywood underlayment, use a corded screwgun. Variable speed screwguns generally come in two types, 5,000 rpm for drywall and 2,500 rpm for wood. The wood screwguns have more torque. I have several screwguns and cordless drivers. I even have a cannister fed screwgun with an extension so I can stand and screw down underlayment.

    When you get good with a screwgun you cup your thumb & index finder around the top and use your pinky on the trigger. The other hand loads the screws.
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    R.I.P. Nov 2015 RaisinCain's Avatar
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    Pops is a retired carpenter and in working with him all he ever bought were Milwaukee tools. NEVER a problem.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    what you want is a impact driver, i use makita, they last about the longest for the money IMO................

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-18...29xZygZ1z140i3
    Picked this one up tonight. Can't wait to try it out tomorrow. Nice and lite. Thx Mark.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyT View Post
    For a small amount of plywood, i.e. 1 sheet or less, a cordless impact driver is good. For production work, as in installing multiple sheets of plywood underlayment, use a corded screwgun. Variable speed screwguns generally come in two types, 5,000 rpm for drywall and 2,500 rpm for wood. The wood screwguns have more torque. I have several screwguns and cordless drivers. I even have a cannister fed screwgun with an extension so I can stand and screw down underlayment.

    When you get good with a screwgun you cup your thumb & index finder around the top and use your pinky on the trigger. The other hand loads the screws.
    Tony, A question about screwguns, does it matter the size of the screw that you put into the end of the drill? I am one who hates starting a screw just to have it sit in place without me holding it as I have big hands and that don't help with tiny screws even if they are magnetized. Let me know.

    thx

  11. #11
    Elite Member TonyT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 24giovanni View Post
    Tony, A question about screwguns, does it matter the size of the screw that you put into the end of the drill? I am one who hates starting a screw just to have it sit in place without me holding it as I have big hands and that don't help with tiny screws even if they are magnetized. Let me know.
    thx
    Screw size makes no difference. If they are quality, sharp screws they will bite and drive in quickly. Best screws are made by Grabber. Boxes also include the best #2 bits on the market. Home Depot screws suck, but they are the best for the money. What are you building/screwing together?
    No one has any right to force data on you
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    If it is not true for you, it isn't true.

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  12. #12
    Resident Rodent Randy's Avatar
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    I agree with TonyT 100%
    also Makita IMO is the best. I have had dewalt, bosch and makita and my coworkers have used Milwaukee. I have used corded scewguns daily for years and cordless impacts have replaced the need for corded in my trade.

    the brushless motors sure look nice on the newer models but pricey

    In terms of screws a lot of people mistake square for robertson. Square bits with robertson screws are awful to work with they strip and don't fit tight on the drive bit. IMO Robertson is a better screw, the bit is slightly convex at the end which allows the screw to remain on the bit when inverted this makes grabbing and loading the next screw faster. In any case make sure you have the right bit especially if your using self tapping screws.

    I was going to post a link to that thread, but the SG search results for "bullsh|t" were too numerous

    sometimes you have to think outside the box to get inside the box .

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyT View Post
    Screw size makes no difference. If they are quality, sharp screws they will bite and drive in quickly. Best screws are made by Grabber. Boxes also include the best #2 bits on the market. Home Depot screws suck, but they are the best for the money. What are you building/screwing together?
    Building a box spring out of wood for a new mattress.

  14. #14
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    Ok, I did the middle of the 2 pieces of plywood to secure the middle of them using 3.5 x 1 3/6 mending braces covering roughly 90 inches. On the back I was either going to use 3 of these http://www.dhcsupplies.com/store/p/3...l#.VFa6Y8koODe covering just over 90 inches using screws in all holes provided. Or could I get a way of using liquid nails and 9 inches wide and 90 inches long.?

    Your thoughts?

    thx

  15. #15
    resident plumber Mark's Avatar
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    the proper tip must be used for whatever screw you use, and they make tip holders that have little teloscoeing sheaths that slide over the long screw to help hold them until they start in the wood..

    http://www.milwaukeetool.com/accesso...ing/48-32-4508

    i use these as they have about the best magnetic holding power i have found. make sure which ever one you get has a little c-clip to hold the bit in it.

    http://www.milwaukeetool.com/accesso...ing/48-32-4502

  16. #16
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    How did the drill work?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CableDude View Post
    How did the drill work?
    Drill worked well. If I had better screws would of made it awesome.

  18. #18
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    what you want is a impact driver, i use makita, they last about the longest for the money IMO................

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-18...29xZygZ1z140i3
    [M]ark, So I could use something like this for installing registers or kitchen cabinet handles with worrying about stripping screws?

  19. #19
    resident plumber Mark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CableDude View Post
    [M]ark, So I could use something like this for installing registers or kitchen cabinet handles with worrying about stripping screws?
    yes, you just have to be careful and go easy on the trigger.

    a little finesse for things like that goes a long way LOL

  20. #20
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    As mentioned above dont use the screws produced that comes with. Buy a named brand.

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