Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Assignment of local IP

  1. #1
    Nomen Nescio
    Guest

    Assignment of local IP

    In XP when changing between admin and user accounts with the "switch user" option, I am assigned a different local IP depending on what user or admin account I am logged into. How does the hardware recognize the difference between user A and user B to do this? Is this done at the AP router or within windows itself?


  2. #2
    Jeff Liebermann
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP

    On Sat, 30 Oct 2010 22:47:21 +0200 (CEST), Nomen Nescio
    <nobody@dizum.com> wrote:

    >In XP when changing between admin and user accounts with the "switch user" option, I am assigned a different local IP depending on what user or admin account I am logged into. How does the hardware recognize the difference between user A and user B to do this? Is this done at the AP router or within windows itself?


    Try:
    Start -> run -> cmd <enter>
    ipconfig /all
    Do this while in admin and user login. Looks for the line:
    DHCP Enabled......... yes or no
    If no, then you have the TCP/IP settings setup for static IP
    addresses, not dynamic.

    You can also create complications if you have more than one network
    interface, such as wired ethernet and wireless. Each one could be
    individually enabled resulting in different IP addresses while using
    either the admin and user logins.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

  3. #3
    Aaron Leonard
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP

    I don't know what all y'all are talking about, when you
    say this is impossible.

    It is quite possible - likely even - that different users
    will have different wireless profiles. E.g. user "aaron"
    might have a profile that associates to SSID "SuperUsers"
    while user "FerlillwussieDan" might have a profile that
    associates to SSID "IrritatingTrolls". The two SSIDs could
    be in different VLANs, even in completely different networks,
    and thereby get different IP addresses from different ranges.

    Aaron

  4. #4
    Alfred
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP

    Aaron Leonard <Aaron@Cisco.COM> wrote in
    news:j7t8d6pt1fr6897i18a7c50gqptb75qmlf@4ax.com:

    > I don't know what all y'all are talking about, when you
    > say this is impossible.
    >
    > It is quite possible - likely even - that different users
    > will have different wireless profiles. E.g. user "aaron"
    > might have a profile that associates to SSID "SuperUsers"
    > while user "FerlillwussieDan" might have a profile that
    > associates to SSID "IrritatingTrolls". The two SSIDs could
    > be in different VLANs, even in completely different

    networks,
    > and thereby get different IP addresses from different

    ranges.
    >
    > Aaron
    >


    Not sure I understand you. I think the OP was saying he was
    getting different IPs using the SAME SSID, but different
    internal usernames on an XP system. When he logs on with one
    username he gets one IP and with another users name another
    IP. This would indicate that the AP/Router can identify
    incoming signals identity on paramaters other than MAC
    address, based on internal names within the operating system
    of the client computer.


  5. #5
    Aaron Leonard
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP


    >> I don't know what all y'all are talking about, when you
    >> say this is impossible.
    >>
    >> It is quite possible - likely even - that different users
    >> will have different wireless profiles. E.g. user "aaron"
    >> might have a profile that associates to SSID "SuperUsers"
    >> while user "FerlillwussieDan" might have a profile that
    >> associates to SSID "IrritatingTrolls". The two SSIDs could
    >> be in different VLANs, even in completely different

    >networks,
    >> and thereby get different IP addresses from different

    >ranges.
    >>
    >> Aaron
    >>

    >
    >Not sure I understand you. I think the OP was saying he was
    >getting different IPs using the SAME SSID, but different
    >internal usernames on an XP system. When he logs on with one
    >username he gets one IP and with another users name another
    >IP. This would indicate that the AP/Router can identify
    >incoming signals identity on paramaters other than MAC
    >address, based on internal names within the operating system
    >of the client computer.


    I don't see where the OP stipulated that he/she was using
    the same SSID.

    Assuming that the same SSID *is* being used ... it is interesting
    to ponder how or whether the described behavior might come to pass.
    What springs to mind at first pass would be if the DHCP client
    were smart enough to issue a different client ID depending upon
    the logged in user ... perhaps a client ID that even encodes
    the username. The DHCP server could then assign an IP address
    accordingly.

    As far as I know, however, the Windows XP DHCP client (when
    operating over a LAN-like adapter) always only uses a DHCP
    client ID of 0x01 followed by the 6-octet MAC address, regardless
    of the logged in username.

    Aaron

  6. #6
    Peter Pan
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP


    "Aaron Leonard" <Aaron@Cisco.COM> wrote in message
    news:4jjld6duit003o51c94evb777o663jrvts@4ax.com...
    >
    >>> I don't know what all y'all are talking about, when you
    >>> say this is impossible.
    >>>
    >>> It is quite possible - likely even - that different users
    >>> will have different wireless profiles. E.g. user "aaron"
    >>> might have a profile that associates to SSID "SuperUsers"
    >>> while user "FerlillwussieDan" might have a profile that
    >>> associates to SSID "IrritatingTrolls". The two SSIDs could
    >>> be in different VLANs, even in completely different

    >>networks,
    >>> and thereby get different IP addresses from different

    >>ranges.
    >>>
    >>> Aaron
    >>>

    >>
    >>Not sure I understand you. I think the OP was saying he was
    >>getting different IPs using the SAME SSID, but different
    >>internal usernames on an XP system. When he logs on with one
    >>username he gets one IP and with another users name another
    >>IP. This would indicate that the AP/Router can identify
    >>incoming signals identity on paramaters other than MAC
    >>address, based on internal names within the operating system
    >>of the client computer.

    >
    > I don't see where the OP stipulated that he/she was using
    > the same SSID.
    >
    > Assuming that the same SSID *is* being used ... it is interesting
    > to ponder how or whether the described behavior might come to pass.
    > What springs to mind at first pass would be if the DHCP client
    > were smart enough to issue a different client ID depending upon
    > the logged in user ... perhaps a client ID that even encodes
    > the username. The DHCP server could then assign an IP address
    > accordingly.
    >
    > As far as I know, however, the Windows XP DHCP client (when
    > operating over a LAN-like adapter) always only uses a DHCP
    > client ID of 0x01 followed by the 6-octet MAC address, regardless
    > of the logged in username.
    >
    > Aaron


    note its a *LOCAL* ip addy, not an external ip addy... there are many ways
    of getting various LOCAL ip addys..... for instance, i have two wireless
    adaptors on my system, each get a different LOCAL ip addy, but both have the
    same EXTERNAL ip addy



  7. #7
    Fruity
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP

    Aaron Leonard <Aaron@Cisco.COM> wrote in
    news:4jjld6duit003o51c94evb777o663jrvts@4ax.com:

    >
    >>> I don't know what all y'all are talking about, when you
    >>> say this is impossible.
    >>>
    >>> It is quite possible - likely even - that different users
    >>> will have different wireless profiles. E.g. user "aaron"
    >>> might have a profile that associates to SSID "SuperUsers"
    >>> while user "FerlillwussieDan" might have a profile that
    >>> associates to SSID "IrritatingTrolls". The two SSIDs could
    >>> be in different VLANs, even in completely different

    >>networks,
    >>> and thereby get different IP addresses from different

    >>ranges.
    >>>
    >>> Aaron
    >>>

    >>
    >>Not sure I understand you. I think the OP was saying he was
    >>getting different IPs using the SAME SSID, but different
    >>internal usernames on an XP system. When he logs on with one
    >>username he gets one IP and with another users name another
    >>IP. This would indicate that the AP/Router can identify
    >>incoming signals identity on paramaters other than MAC
    >>address, based on internal names within the operating system
    >>of the client computer.

    >
    > I don't see where the OP stipulated that he/she was using
    > the same SSID.
    >
    > Assuming that the same SSID *is* being used ... it is interesting
    > to ponder how or whether the described behavior might come to pass.
    > What springs to mind at first pass would be if the DHCP client
    > were smart enough to issue a different client ID depending upon
    > the logged in user ... perhaps a client ID that even encodes
    > the username. The DHCP server could then assign an IP address
    > accordingly.
    >
    > As far as I know, however, the Windows XP DHCP client (when
    > operating over a LAN-like adapter) always only uses a DHCP
    > client ID of 0x01 followed by the 6-octet MAC address, regardless
    > of the logged in username.
    >
    > Aaron



    See the post from Peter Pan. Also in reading about VLANs on wikipedia,
    that you mentioned earlier, it appears the host can identify
    specifically what system is connecting and issue or deny DHCP or router
    access based on many different paramaters, not just MAC/hostname/client
    adapter name, thus yielding whatever local IP is desired or none at all
    (denial).

    But I am not sure how this works. Also if the OS is reported as you
    indicate above, that is just another indication of what system is
    connecting. I believe they can also triangulate your antennas location
    fairly precisely via sensors at various locations.

    Jeff often remarks that he throttles or blocks clients he does not like
    but have not seem him mention how he does that.

  8. #8
    alexd
    Guest

    Re: Assignment of local IP

    Meanwhile, at the alt.internet.wireless Job Justification Hearings, Fruity
    chose the tried and tested strategy of:

    > Also in reading about VLANs on wikipedia, that you mentioned earlier, it
    > appears the host can identify specifically what system is connecting and
    > issue or deny DHCP or router access based on many different paramaters,


    > But I am not sure how this works.


    802.1x

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) (UnSoEsNpEaTm@ale.cx)
    02:11:36 up 13 days, 5:42, 7 users, load average: 0.06, 0.03, 0.01
    "I am utterly appalled at how I have been treated like a criminal"
    -- Andrew Crossley, ACS:Law, 13 August 2010


Similar Threads

  1. Local Loop connectivity very slow
    By ankush_malhotra in forum Broadband Tweaks Help
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-17-10, 10:56 PM
  2. Digital Subscriber Line (xDSL) FAQ v20010108
    By jkristof@interaccess.com in forum comp.dcom.xdsl
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-21-09, 12:51 PM
  3. WRT54G Wireless can connect to internet, Cannot connect to Local LAN PCs
    By Alterego in forum Wireless Networks & Routers
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-07-07, 05:11 AM
  4. Frames
    By Rivas in forum Distributed Computing
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 06-16-07, 03:28 PM
  5. folding
    By Rivas in forum Distributed Computing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-23-07, 11:55 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •