Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Re: Why Automate Time Tracking? Dramatically Increased Visibility

  1. #1
    Ari Silverstein
    Guest

    Re: Why Automate Time Tracking? Dramatically Increased Visibility

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 05:50:25 -0700 (PDT), Edwin wrote:

    > Conclusion:
    > Increased visibility into timesheet activities and data alone created
    > significant material benefits to any organization.


    First, I didn't pour through your entire website (which has several
    Apache errors), I saw no freeware.

    Second, the flip side to your statement above is that there can be
    significant pushback from non managerial types who simply don't like
    having their every second monitored. Hourly and salaried both. There
    is an expectation, rightly so, that your employer does not own every
    friggin second of your workday. An expectation of some level of
    privacy.

    Our environment is one of milestones and deadlines. How you or your
    team makes those is entirely up to you or your team. We found time
    tracking to be intrusive, display a lack of trust and
    counterproductive.

    > When employees know that all time tracking activities are closely
    > and easily monitored in real time, they improve their performance.


    Total ********, it only increases paranoia and attempts to replace
    poor management.

    > Accordingly, data quality and compliance can improve significantly.


    If you mean the quality of tracking someone's time, sure, but at what
    cost? Whose tracking the time inputs to see if they are accurate?
    whose validating the time trackers?

    > Edwin John
    > http://www.pacifictimesheet.com


    Sig left in for those who might want to visit.

    Btw, we ran across this issue in a reverse manner. You wrote a
    workflow for time management. We wrote an chain-of-command
    authorization process for the military then included several modules
    (grant, employee interview, leave and liberty, etc). when we added the
    civilian employee T&A, since all civilians are contractors, they went
    apeshit.

    P.S. Are you implementing any encryption for this sensitize data?
    --
    9ec4c12949a4f31474f299058ce2b22a

  2. #2
    Gordon Burditt
    Guest

    Re: Why Automate Time Tracking? Dramatically Increased Visibility

    >> Conclusion:
    >> Increased visibility into timesheet activities and data alone created
    >> significant material benefits to any organization.

    >
    >First, I didn't pour through your entire website (which has several
    >Apache errors), I saw no freeware.
    >
    >Second, the flip side to your statement above is that there can be
    >significant pushback from non managerial types who simply don't like
    >having their every second monitored. Hourly and salaried both. There
    >is an expectation, rightly so, that your employer does not own every
    >friggin second of your workday. An expectation of some level of
    >privacy.


    I don't trust the output of any time tracking system that doesn't
    allow for charging time to time tracking itself. A 15-minute time
    slot before a meeting that was used figuring out how to get more
    whiteboard markers (the guy who usually did it was on vacation)
    might explode into a 5-hour, 10-man argument over whose project to
    charge for that, since the presentations covered all active projects
    at the time, but not all equally, and not all of them used the
    whiteboard equally.

    Things that don't contribute, and in fact interfere with projects,
    such as re-shuffling whose desk is where, are rarely given charge
    numbers. If there are 4 projects I can't work on because the
    computer on my desk has no power or network (or room for a chair,
    much less a chair), which one gets charged? (Oh, yes, the time
    tracking software doesn't work either with no power.) Which one
    gets charged for replacing a hard disk damaged in the move, and
    which gets charged for recovering lost changes after the last backup
    (such as incoming email missed, and I don't know what project that
    was about until I recover it)?

    Are you prepared to handle time-tracking data under HIPAA medical
    privacy rules? That may mean management doesn't have a need to see
    individual data, so they don't. The amount of time spent, say,
    using the rest room may relate to a medical condition (like pregnancy,
    having a colostomy bag, etc.)

    >Our environment is one of milestones and deadlines. How you or your
    >team makes those is entirely up to you or your team. We found time
    >tracking to be intrusive, display a lack of trust and
    >counterproductive.


    I've told bosses flat out on occasion: I will work late (free,
    since I'm salaried) to get the hot project done. I will *NOT* work
    late to fill out time sheets for work you're not paying me for
    anyway, attend United Way presentations, move desks around, RSVP
    to company-sponsored social functions, or attend meetings not related
    to the project, so the instant you ask after hours, I'm going home.

    >> When employees know that all time tracking activities are closely
    >> and easily monitored in real time, they improve their performance.


    Employees can tailor their performance to what's being counted.
    Programmers, for example, can run all their code through a lines-of-code
    expander program which will increase the number of lines of code
    by a factor of 1000, while making the code very difficult to read,
    but no change in function. Police officers who get credit for writing
    tickets might find that no one checks their conviction rate, so they
    write hundreds of tickets a day for "having proper identification"
    "having required auto insurance" and "not speeding". Oh, yes, they
    can also lie. Few employees will voluntarily put down using the
    rest room.

    >Total ********, it only increases paranoia and attempts to replace
    >poor management.
    >
    >> Accordingly, data quality and compliance can improve significantly.

    >
    >If you mean the quality of tracking someone's time, sure, but at what
    >cost? Whose tracking the time inputs to see if they are accurate?
    >whose validating the time trackers?


    The equilibrium happens when 100% of the employee's time is spent
    tracking the employee's time.

    >> Edwin John
    >> http://www.pacifictimesheet.com

    >
    >Sig left in for those who might want to visit.


  3. #3
    Ari Silverstein
    Guest

    Re: Why Automate Time Tracking? Dramatically Increased Visibility

    On Mon, 27 Sep 2010 00:12:11 -0500, Gordon Burditt wrote:

    >>> Conclusion:
    >>> Increased visibility into timesheet activities and data alone created
    >>> significant material benefits to any organization.

    >>
    >>First, I didn't pour through your entire website (which has several
    >>Apache errors), I saw no freeware.
    >>
    >>Second, the flip side to your statement above is that there can be
    >>significant pushback from non managerial types who simply don't like
    >>having their every second monitored. Hourly and salaried both. There
    >>is an expectation, rightly so, that your employer does not own every
    >>friggin second of your workday. An expectation of some level of
    >>privacy.

    >
    > I don't trust the output of any time tracking system that doesn't
    > allow for charging time to time tracking itself. A 15-minute time
    > slot before a meeting that was used figuring out how to get more
    > whiteboard markers (the guy who usually did it was on vacation)
    > might explode into a 5-hour, 10-man argument over whose project to
    > charge for that, since the presentations covered all active projects
    > at the time, but not all equally, and not all of them used the
    > whiteboard equally.
    >
    > Things that don't contribute, and in fact interfere with projects,
    > such as re-shuffling whose desk is where, are rarely given charge
    > numbers. If there are 4 projects I can't work on because the
    > computer on my desk has no power or network (or room for a chair,
    > much less a chair), which one gets charged? (Oh, yes, the time
    > tracking software doesn't work either with no power.) Which one
    > gets charged for replacing a hard disk damaged in the move, and
    > which gets charged for recovering lost changes after the last backup
    > (such as incoming email missed, and I don't know what project that
    > was about until I recover it)?
    >
    > Are you prepared to handle time-tracking data under HIPAA medical
    > privacy rules? That may mean management doesn't have a need to see
    > individual data, so they don't. The amount of time spent, say,
    > using the rest room may relate to a medical condition (like pregnancy,
    > having a colostomy bag, etc.)
    >
    >>Our environment is one of milestones and deadlines. How you or your
    >>team makes those is entirely up to you or your team. We found time
    >>tracking to be intrusive, display a lack of trust and
    >>counterproductive.

    >
    > I've told bosses flat out on occasion: I will work late (free,
    > since I'm salaried) to get the hot project done. I will *NOT* work
    > late to fill out time sheets for work you're not paying me for
    > anyway, attend United Way presentations, move desks around, RSVP
    > to company-sponsored social functions, or attend meetings not related
    > to the project, so the instant you ask after hours, I'm going home.
    >
    >>> When employees know that all time tracking activities are closely
    >>> and easily monitored in real time, they improve their performance.

    >
    > Employees can tailor their performance to what's being counted.
    > Programmers, for example, can run all their code through a lines-of-code
    > expander program which will increase the number of lines of code
    > by a factor of 1000, while making the code very difficult to read,
    > but no change in function. Police officers who get credit for writing
    > tickets might find that no one checks their conviction rate, so they
    > write hundreds of tickets a day for "having proper identification"
    > "having required auto insurance" and "not speeding". Oh, yes, they
    > can also lie. Few employees will voluntarily put down using the
    > rest room.
    >
    >>Total ********, it only increases paranoia and attempts to replace
    >>poor management.
    >>
    >>> Accordingly, data quality and compliance can improve significantly.

    >>
    >>If you mean the quality of tracking someone's time, sure, but at what
    >>cost? Whose tracking the time inputs to see if they are accurate?
    >>whose validating the time trackers?

    >
    > The equilibrium happens when 100% of the employee's time is spent
    > tracking the employee's time.


    Gordon, you've said it all. :)
    --
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVvO2xdW2JY
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_WhnvofcHy4...RIMG0018-1.JPG

Similar Threads

  1. This is why Comcast sucks! (Rant)
    By JPThomas68 in forum US Broadband Providers
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-24-11, 07:08 AM
  2. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-01-09, 12:54 PM
  3. few questions about my internet...
    By charlieC in forum General Broadband Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-08-08, 09:06 PM
  4. Again, full time PS3's needed.
    By rickoic in forum Distributed Computing
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-15-08, 10:06 AM
  5. Treacherous Legion (360)
    By Rivas in forum Console Gaming
    Replies: 113
    Last Post: 01-29-07, 03:06 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •