Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: recommendations for wireless access point that does this...

  1. #1
    sid
    Guest

    recommendations for wireless access point that does this...

    Hi all
    Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this newsgroup.
    We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely & their gateway & DNS settings
    pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able to
    have a hardwired IP, gateway & DNS setting on it's wired side in the same
    way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP server
    on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this particular
    function & if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do such.
    The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick - once you set
    its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear. I've
    tried googling for W access point comparisons but the only info that
    features in the results is speed, good looks & not obscure configuration
    abilities.

    tia



  2. #2
    DanS
    Guest

    Re: recommendations for wireless access point that does this...

    "sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in
    news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net:

    > Hi all
    > Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this
    > newsgroup. We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP.
    > All the client windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely & their
    > gateway & DNS settings pointing at a proxy server that gives internet
    > access. I need to add wireless capability to this network. So the
    > access point has to be able to have a hardwired IP, gateway & DNS
    > setting on it's wired side in the same way as all the existing clients
    > and ideally it will have its own DHCP server on its wireless side. Is
    > this possible, is there a name for this particular function & if so
    > are there any recommendations for a box that will do such. The boss
    > has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that, presumably
    > because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick - once you set its
    > IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear. I've
    > tried googling for W access point comparisons but the only info that
    > features in the results is speed, good looks & not obscure
    > configuration abilities.


    First of all....that Netgear router is an 'N' product...and most likely
    will only work in 'N' mode *reliably* with other Netgear 'N' products.

    Second......it will do what you want it to do. It just needs to be set up
    properly. You are doing something wrong.

    Reset it to factory defaults, and try again. The (easy) way it needs to
    be hooked up is not using the WAN side. It should have one of the LAN
    ports uplinked to the existing hardwired LAN.

    Get it working with everthing wide-open, turn off all the bullsh*t
    features that device has. Then secure it after you know it work.


  3. #3
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: recommendations for wireless access point that does this...

    On 24/02/2010 13:39, DanS wrote:
    > "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in
    > news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net:
    >
    >> Hi all
    >> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this
    >> newsgroup. We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP.
    >> All the client windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their
    >> gateway& DNS settings pointing at a proxy server that gives internet
    >> access. I need to add wireless capability to this network. So the
    >> access point has to be able to have a hardwired IP, gateway& DNS
    >> setting on it's wired side in the same way as all the existing clients
    >> and ideally it will have its own DHCP server on its wireless side. Is
    >> this possible, is there a name for this particular function& if so
    >> are there any recommendations for a box that will do such. The boss
    >> has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that, presumably
    >> because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick - once you set its
    >> IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear. I've
    >> tried googling for W access point comparisons but the only info that
    >> features in the results is speed, good looks& not obscure
    >> configuration abilities.

    >
    > First of all....that Netgear router is an 'N' product...and most likely
    > will only work in 'N' mode *reliably* with other Netgear 'N' products.
    >
    > Second......it will do what you want it to do. It just needs to be set up
    > properly. You are doing something wrong.


    I don't have a 2nd router handy at the moment to experiment but do SOHO
    routers wired as AP's have the capability to use their DNS forwarder to
    work on the LAN side or is it purely a WAN function?
    >
    > Reset it to factory defaults, and try again. The (easy) way it needs to
    > be hooked up is not using the WAN side. It should have one of the LAN
    > ports uplinked to the existing hardwired LAN.
    >
    > Get it working with everthing wide-open, turn off all the bullsh*t
    > features that device has. Then secure it after you know it work.
    >



  4. #4
    ps56k
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    how about a little white space...

    "sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    > Hi all
    > Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this newsgroup.
    > We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    > windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely & their gateway & DNS
    > settings
    > pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    > wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able to
    > have a hardwired IP, gateway & DNS setting on it's wired side in the same
    > way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    > server
    > on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    > particular
    > function & if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    > such.


    any normal wireless access point will perform these functions.

    > The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    > presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick


    all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just confuses the
    issue
    http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...s/WNR2000.aspx
    you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and "wireless
    access point" ?
    If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    purchase a "router" ?

    > once you set
    > its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear.


    exactly how did you physically connect the "router" - which port did you use
    ?
    what does that mean - disappear ?
    you no longer see the IP address and can't ping it from the wired side ?

    > I've
    > tried googling for wireless access point comparisons but the only info
    > that
    > features in the results is speed, good looks & not obscure configuration
    > abilities.
    >





  5. #5
    DanS
    Guest

    Re: recommendations for wireless access point that does this...

    Bob <bob@invalid.invalid> wrote in
    news:Q8adneNg3-BlqRjWnZ2dnUVZ8g-dnZ2d@bt.com:

    > On 24/02/2010 13:39, DanS wrote:
    >> "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in
    >> news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net:
    >>
    >>> Hi all
    >>> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this
    >>> newsgroup. We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP.
    >>> All the client windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their
    >>> gateway& DNS settings pointing at a proxy server that gives
    >>> internet access. I need to add wireless capability to this network.
    >>> So the access point has to be able to have a hardwired IP, gateway&
    >>> DNS setting on it's wired side in the same way as all the existing
    >>> clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP server on its wireless
    >>> side. Is this possible, is there a name for this particular
    >>> function& if so are there any recommendations for a box that will
    >>> do such. The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear
    >>> router that, presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the
    >>> trick - once you set its IP address for the internal network it just
    >>> seems to disappear. I've tried googling for W access point
    >>> comparisons but the only info that features in the results is speed,
    >>> good looks& not obscure configuration abilities.

    >>
    >> First of all....that Netgear router is an 'N' product...and most
    >> likely will only work in 'N' mode *reliably* with other Netgear 'N'
    >> products.
    >>
    >> Second......it will do what you want it to do. It just needs to be
    >> set up properly. You are doing something wrong.

    >
    > I don't have a 2nd router handy at the moment to experiment but do
    > SOHO routers wired as AP's have the capability to use their DNS
    > forwarder to work on the LAN side or is it purely a WAN function?


    An AP-only is just a bridge and DNS would typically be handled by
    whatever DNS server is connected to the LAN.

    If there's the first NAT RTR connected to the internet, doing DHCP, and
    DNS redirect's, then when an AP-only is added, the first RTR can still
    handle DHCP & DNS. The AP_only will just bridge the DHCP requests over to
    the LAN and the 1st RTR will take care of it. Part of that DHCP response
    is usually DNS as well.

  6. #6
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: recommendations for wireless access point that does this...

    On 24/02/2010 14:58, DanS wrote:
    > Bob<bob@invalid.invalid> wrote in
    > news:Q8adneNg3-BlqRjWnZ2dnUVZ8g-dnZ2d@bt.com:
    >
    >> On 24/02/2010 13:39, DanS wrote:
    >>> "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in
    >>> news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net:
    >>>
    >>>> Hi all
    >>>> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this
    >>>> newsgroup. We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP.
    >>>> All the client windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their
    >>>> gateway& DNS settings pointing at a proxy server that gives
    >>>> internet access. I need to add wireless capability to this network.
    >>>> So the access point has to be able to have a hardwired IP, gateway&
    >>>> DNS setting on it's wired side in the same way as all the existing
    >>>> clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP server on its wireless
    >>>> side. Is this possible, is there a name for this particular
    >>>> function& if so are there any recommendations for a box that will
    >>>> do such. The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear
    >>>> router that, presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the
    >>>> trick - once you set its IP address for the internal network it just
    >>>> seems to disappear. I've tried googling for W access point
    >>>> comparisons but the only info that features in the results is speed,
    >>>> good looks& not obscure configuration abilities.
    >>>
    >>> First of all....that Netgear router is an 'N' product...and most
    >>> likely will only work in 'N' mode *reliably* with other Netgear 'N'
    >>> products.
    >>>
    >>> Second......it will do what you want it to do. It just needs to be
    >>> set up properly. You are doing something wrong.

    >>
    >> I don't have a 2nd router handy at the moment to experiment but do
    >> SOHO routers wired as AP's have the capability to use their DNS
    >> forwarder to work on the LAN side or is it purely a WAN function?

    >
    > An AP-only is just a bridge and DNS would typically be handled by
    > whatever DNS server is connected to the LAN.
    >
    > If there's the first NAT RTR connected to the internet, doing DHCP, and
    > DNS redirect's, then when an AP-only is added, the first RTR can still
    > handle DHCP& DNS. The AP_only will just bridge the DHCP requests over to
    > the LAN and the 1st RTR will take care of it. Part of that DHCP response
    > is usually DNS as well.

    It is not very clear what the OP is going to connect his device to or
    why he seems to wish the wireless clients not to go through his proxy
    server, he did also specify "DNS setting on it's wired side" so he is
    not going to use another router for his DNS. If he is just setting up a
    wireless network for guests to use he should probably be looking for a
    wireless device which has a guest access.
    Just been googling.
    " The role of the proxy should therefore be no more and no less than to
    receive DNS requests from clients on the LAN side, forward those
    verbatim to one of the known upstream recursive resolvers on the WAN
    side, and ensure that the whole response is returned verbatim to the
    original client."
    <http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc5625.txt>

  7. #7
    Char Jackson
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 08:57:46 -0600, "ps56k"
    <pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote:

    >"sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    >news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    >
    >> The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    >> presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick

    >
    >all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just confuses the
    >issue
    >http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...s/WNR2000.aspx
    >you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and "wireless
    >access point" ?
    >If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    >purchase a "router" ?


    Many wireless routers are less expensive than access points, so maybe
    there were budget considerations in addition to some general
    confusion. As we know, wireless routers can easily be configured as
    access points, (but the reverse isn't true.)


  8. #8
    ps56k
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router


    "Char Jackson" <none@none.invalid> wrote in message
    news:5vlao59kbihaiprrs4jhnal5o5equ7vhoo@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 08:57:46 -0600, "ps56k"
    > <pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote:
    >
    >>"sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    >>news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    >>
    >>> The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    >>> presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick

    >>
    >>all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just confuses
    >>the
    >>issue
    >>http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...s/WNR2000.aspx
    >>you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and "wireless
    >>access point" ?
    >>If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    >>purchase a "router" ?

    >
    > Many wireless routers are less expensive than access points, so maybe
    > there were budget considerations in addition to some general
    > confusion. As we know, wireless routers can easily be configured as
    > access points, (but the reverse isn't true.)


    less expensive - yeah... just noticed that in comparing this Netgear router
    to a WAP54G
    BTW - on the Netgear site, they don't even have/list just WAP's -


    >




  9. #9
    ps56k
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router


    "sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    > Hi all
    > Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this newsgroup.
    > We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    > windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely & their gateway & DNS
    > settings
    > pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    > wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able to
    > have a hardwired IP, gateway & DNS setting on it's wired side in the same
    > way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    > server
    > on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    > particular
    > function & if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    > such.
    > The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    > presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick - once you
    > set
    > its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear. I've
    > tried googling for W access point comparisons but the only info that
    > features in the results is speed, good looks & not obscure configuration
    > abilities.
    >
    > tia
    >



    BTW - just tell us overall, what you are trying to accomplish ???
    ie - you have an internal wired IP network,
    and are now adding a WiFi network for "customers" etc...

    How many internal devices ?
    What internal router is being used as the main connection ?
    What Proxy Server are you using ?
    --

    At one point, we initially had a static IP network to tell which users were
    doing what.
    But, as time went on, we dropped that, went with DHCP for all computers,
    but left all the "devices" as static - so we could always connect directly
    to them
    (servers, switches, routers, disk array, printers, plotters, etc)
    We also had the MS Proxy server for browser...
    Oh yeah - this was across about 30 branch locations around the country...




  10. #10
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    On 24/02/2010 21:29, ps56k wrote:

    > BTW - on the Netgear site, they don't even have/list just WAP's -


    Did you just look at the "Home Networking" page?

    <http://www.netgear.com/Products/APsWirelessControllers/AccessPoints.aspx?for=Business+Networking>
    <http://www.netgear.co.uk/office_wireless_access_points.php>


  11. #11
    ps56k
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router


    "Bob" <bob@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:SOednXtqaK3MoRvWnZ2dnUVZ8rmdnZ2d@bt.com...
    > On 24/02/2010 21:29, ps56k wrote:
    >
    >> BTW - on the Netgear site, they don't even have/list just WAP's -

    >
    > Did you just look at the "Home Networking" page?
    >
    > <http://www.netgear.com/Products/APsWirelessControllers/AccessPoints.aspx?for=Business+Networking>
    > <http://www.netgear.co.uk/office_wireless_access_points.php>
    >


    oops - missed it for some reason -
    it was over on the far right side below the Storage section -
    http://www.netgear.com/Products.aspx




  12. #12
    sid
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    Again sorry for having been away from this for a day or so.


    "ps56k" <pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    news:hm4654$rlh$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    > "sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    > news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    > > Hi all
    > > Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this

    newsgroup.
    > > We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    > > windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely & their gateway & DNS
    > > settings
    > > pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    > > wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able

    to
    > > have a hardwired IP, gateway & DNS setting on it's wired side in the

    same
    > > way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    > > server
    > > on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    > > particular
    > > function & if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    > > such.
    > > The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    > > presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick - once you
    > > set
    > > its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear. I've
    > > tried googling for W access point comparisons but the only info that
    > > features in the results is speed, good looks & not obscure configuration
    > > abilities.
    > >
    > > tia
    > >

    >
    >
    > BTW - just tell us overall, what you are trying to accomplish ???
    > ie - you have an internal wired IP network,
    > and are now adding a WiFi network for "customers" etc...


    We have a wired network and are simply wanting to add wireless access into a
    part of the network that's quite a distance from the rest of it. This will
    be only for our own trusted laptop or two & ideally we'd like the wireless
    to give access to internal peer to peer as well as the internet.

    >
    > How many internal devices ?


    Maybe 2 dozen PCs max.

    > What internal router is being used as the main connection ?
    > What Proxy Server are you using ?


    A dedicated PC running Winproxy

    Thanks again



  13. #13
    sid
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    Sorry to have been offline for a day and thanks for your interest.

    "ps56k" <pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    news:hm3epg$vpc$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > how about a little white space...
    >
    > "sid" <sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    > news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    > > Hi all
    > > Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this

    newsgroup.
    > > We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    > > windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely & their gateway & DNS
    > > settings
    > > pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    > > wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able

    to
    > > have a hardwired IP, gateway & DNS setting on it's wired side in the

    same
    > > way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    > > server
    > > on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    > > particular
    > > function & if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    > > such.

    >
    > any normal wireless access point will perform these functions.
    >
    > > The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    > > presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick

    >
    > all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just confuses

    the
    > issue
    >

    http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...utersandGatewa
    ys/WNR2000.aspx
    > you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and "wireless
    > access point" ?


    My networking skills are such that I wouldn't be certain of the dictionary
    definitions but realise that a router is probably overkill for this
    situation.

    > If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    > purchase a "router" ?


    Cos he's the boss ;-)
    This happened before he involved me to try & sort things out.

    >
    > > once you set
    > > its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear.

    >
    > exactly how did you physically connect the "router" - which port did you

    use
    > ?


    One of its LAN PORTS linked into the internal network.

    > what does that mean - disappear ?
    > you no longer see the IP address and can't ping it from the wired side ?


    Yes just that. Only way to get it back is to press the reset button & lose
    all the settings. One thing I am a little confused by with this box is that
    there is an IP addr under basic settings & then there's another one under
    LAN settings & I'm not really sure what should go where.

    Thanks



  14. #14
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    On 26/02/2010 11:08, sid wrote:
    > Sorry to have been offline for a day and thanks for your interest.
    >
    > "ps56k"<pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    > news:hm3epg$vpc$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> how about a little white space...
    >>
    >> "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    >> news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    >>> Hi all
    >>> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this

    > newsgroup.
    >>> We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    >>> windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their gateway& DNS
    >>> settings
    >>> pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    >>> wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able

    > to
    >>> have a hardwired IP, gateway& DNS setting on it's wired side in the

    > same
    >>> way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    >>> server
    >>> on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    >>> particular
    >>> function& if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    >>> such.

    >>
    >> any normal wireless access point will perform these functions.
    >>
    >>> The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    >>> presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick

    >>
    >> all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just confuses

    > the
    >> issue
    >>

    > http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...utersandGatewa
    > ys/WNR2000.aspx
    >> you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and "wireless
    >> access point" ?

    >
    > My networking skills are such that I wouldn't be certain of the dictionary
    > definitions but realise that a router is probably overkill for this
    > situation.
    >
    >> If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    >> purchase a "router" ?

    >
    > Cos he's the boss ;-)
    > This happened before he involved me to try& sort things out.
    >
    >>
    >>> once you set
    >>> its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear.

    >>
    >> exactly how did you physically connect the "router" - which port did you

    > use
    >> ?

    >
    > One of its LAN PORTS linked into the internal network.
    >
    >> what does that mean - disappear ?
    >> you no longer see the IP address and can't ping it from the wired side ?

    >
    > Yes just that. Only way to get it back is to press the reset button& lose
    > all the settings. One thing I am a little confused by with this box is that
    > there is an IP addr under basic settings& then there's another one under
    > LAN settings& I'm not really sure what should go where.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >

    The IP address under basic settings will be the WAN port address. You
    will need to go to the LAN configuration settings to set the LAN IP
    address to one that corresponds to your network.
    What OS are the laptops going to use?
    If they are using Windows there is no need to use DHCP in the router or
    trying to get DNS to work there. If the laptops are also used elsewhere
    you can set them up to use DHCP for outside use but for your own network
    you could use the alternate config settings in TCP/IP to specify IP
    Address, gateway and DNS settings.
    see bottom of page:-
    <http://www.home-network-help.com/set-ip.html>


  15. #15
    sid
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router


    "Bob" <bob@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:zeidnSjpY4LEJxrWnZ2dnUVZ7r6dnZ2d@bt.com...
    > On 26/02/2010 11:08, sid wrote:
    > > Sorry to have been offline for a day and thanks for your interest.
    > >
    > > "ps56k"<pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    > > news:hm3epg$vpc$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > >> how about a little white space...
    > >>
    > >> "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    > >>> Hi all
    > >>> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this

    > > newsgroup.
    > >>> We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the

    client
    > >>> windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their gateway& DNS
    > >>> settings
    > >>> pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    > >>> wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be

    able
    > > to
    > >>> have a hardwired IP, gateway& DNS setting on it's wired side in the

    > > same
    > >>> way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    > >>> server
    > >>> on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    > >>> particular
    > >>> function& if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    > >>> such.
    > >>
    > >> any normal wireless access point will perform these functions.
    > >>
    > >>> The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    > >>> presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick
    > >>
    > >> all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just

    confuses
    > > the
    > >> issue
    > >>

    > >

    http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...utersandGatewa
    > > ys/WNR2000.aspx
    > >> you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and

    "wireless
    > >> access point" ?

    > >
    > > My networking skills are such that I wouldn't be certain of the

    dictionary
    > > definitions but realise that a router is probably overkill for this
    > > situation.
    > >
    > >> If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    > >> purchase a "router" ?

    > >
    > > Cos he's the boss ;-)
    > > This happened before he involved me to try& sort things out.
    > >
    > >>
    > >>> once you set
    > >>> its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear.
    > >>
    > >> exactly how did you physically connect the "router" - which port did

    you
    > > use
    > >> ?

    > >
    > > One of its LAN PORTS linked into the internal network.
    > >
    > >> what does that mean - disappear ?
    > >> you no longer see the IP address and can't ping it from the wired side

    ?
    > >
    > > Yes just that. Only way to get it back is to press the reset button&

    lose
    > > all the settings. One thing I am a little confused by with this box is

    that
    > > there is an IP addr under basic settings& then there's another one

    under
    > > LAN settings& I'm not really sure what should go where.
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > >

    > The IP address under basic settings will be the WAN port address. You
    > will need to go to the LAN configuration settings to set the LAN IP
    > address to one that corresponds to your network.


    Ok so since I'm not using the WAN skt then this setting shouldn't matter?

    > What OS are the laptops going to use?


    XP

    > If they are using Windows there is no need to use DHCP in the router or
    > trying to get DNS to work there. If the laptops are also used elsewhere
    > you can set them up to use DHCP for outside use but for your own network
    > you could use the alternate config settings in TCP/IP to specify IP
    > Address, gateway and DNS settings.


    Yes we'd prefer that the laptops can just hook in using DHCP as the users
    aren't likely to be savvy enough to fiddle around changing TCP/IP settings.
    Thanks


    > see bottom of page:-
    > <http://www.home-network-help.com/set-ip.html>
    >




  16. #16
    ps56k
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router


    "Bob" <bob@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:zeidnSjpY4LEJxrWnZ2dnUVZ7r6dnZ2d@bt.com...
    > On 26/02/2010 11:08, sid wrote:
    >> Sorry to have been offline for a day and thanks for your interest.
    >>
    >> "ps56k"<pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    >> news:hm3epg$vpc$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>> how about a little white space...
    >>>
    >>> "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    >>>> Hi all
    >>>> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this

    >> newsgroup.
    >>>> We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the client
    >>>> windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their gateway& DNS
    >>>> settings
    >>>> pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    >>>> wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be able

    >> to
    >>>> have a hardwired IP, gateway& DNS setting on it's wired side in the

    >> same
    >>>> way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    >>>> server
    >>>> on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    >>>> particular
    >>>> function& if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    >>>> such.
    >>>
    >>> any normal wireless access point will perform these functions.
    >>>
    >>>> The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    >>>> presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick
    >>>
    >>> all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just confuses

    >> the
    >>> issue
    >>>

    >> http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...utersandGatewa
    >> ys/WNR2000.aspx
    >>> you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and
    >>> "wireless
    >>> access point" ?

    >>
    >> My networking skills are such that I wouldn't be certain of the
    >> dictionary
    >> definitions but realise that a router is probably overkill for this
    >> situation.
    >>
    >>> If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    >>> purchase a "router" ?

    >>
    >> Cos he's the boss ;-)
    >> This happened before he involved me to try& sort things out.
    >>
    >>>
    >>>> once you set
    >>>> its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear.
    >>>
    >>> exactly how did you physically connect the "router" - which port did you

    >> use
    >>> ?

    >>
    >> One of its LAN PORTS linked into the internal network.
    >>
    >>> what does that mean - disappear ?
    >>> you no longer see the IP address and can't ping it from the wired side ?

    >>
    >> Yes just that. Only way to get it back is to press the reset button&
    >> lose
    >> all the settings. One thing I am a little confused by with this box is
    >> that
    >> there is an IP addr under basic settings& then there's another one under
    >> LAN settings& I'm not really sure what should go where.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>

    > The IP address under basic settings will be the WAN port address. You will
    > need to go to the LAN configuration settings to set the LAN IP address to
    > one that corresponds to your network.
    > What OS are the laptops going to use?
    > If they are using Windows there is no need to use DHCP in the router or
    > trying to get DNS to work there. If the laptops are also used elsewhere
    > you can set them up to use DHCP for outside use but for your own network
    > you could use the alternate config settings in TCP/IP to specify IP
    > Address, gateway and DNS settings.
    > see bottom of page:-
    > <http://www.home-network-help.com/set-ip.html>


    grabbing the manual -
    ftp://downloads.netgear.com/files/WN...UM_24FEB09.pdf

    yup -
    the Basic Settings on section 1-4 - is for the WAN connection to an ISP

    the Customize Network Settings on section 4-1 is the local LAN side.
    (defaults to 192.168.1.1)

    BTW - what IP address scheme are you using for the rest of your wired
    network ?
    ie - like 192.168.1.xxx ?

    Since you have a small network -
    just make sure that any DHCP address ranges are reset for just a couple of
    devices,
    are NOT being used by your wired static IP devices...




  17. #17
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    On 26/02/2010 14:41, ps56k wrote:

    >
    > grabbing the manual -
    > ftp://downloads.netgear.com/files/WN...UM_24FEB09.pdf


    If you don't mind that some of the items are in French you can find a
    few Netgear Simulators here:-
    <http://firmware.netgear-forum.com/index.php?act=interface>

  18. #18
    alexd
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 11:08:51 +0000, sid wrote:

    > "ps56k" <pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    > news:hm3epg$vpc$1@news.eternal-september.org...


    >> you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and
    >> "wireless access point" ?

    >
    > My networking skills are such that I wouldn't be certain of the
    > dictionary definitions but realise that a router is probably overkill
    > for this situation.


    At this level, the difference between the two is very little. The router
    will have it's LAN switch and wireless bridged together, an AP will have
    it's single LAN port and wireless bridged togther. The router will have a
    port labelled WAN and if you ignore it and turn off DHCP you will have
    yourself an AP.

    >> If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    >> purchase a "router" ?


    The economics of it mean that things labelled 'router' are cheaper than
    things labelled 'AP', even though the chips inside and OS are virtually
    identical.

    > Cos he's the boss ;-)
    > This happened before he involved me to try & sort things out.


    'twas ever thus!

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) (UnSoEsNpEaTm@ale.cx)
    16:13:29 up 22 days, 8:35, 4 users, load average: 0.03, 0.16, 0.14
    DIMENSION-CONTROLLING FORT DOH HAS NOW BEEN DEMOLISHED,
    AND TIME STARTED FLOWING REVERSELY

  19. #19
    sid
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router


    "ps56k" <pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    news:hm8mja$c1$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    > "Bob" <bob@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:zeidnSjpY4LEJxrWnZ2dnUVZ7r6dnZ2d@bt.com...
    > > On 26/02/2010 11:08, sid wrote:
    > >> Sorry to have been offline for a day and thanks for your interest.
    > >>
    > >> "ps56k"<pschuman_no_spam_me@interserv.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:hm3epg$vpc$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > >>> how about a little white space...
    > >>>
    > >>> "sid"<sid@here.there.com> wrote in message
    > >>> news:68ydnXcVio0LuhjWnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@pipex.net...
    > >>>> Hi all
    > >>>> Not posted here before but there seems to be some life in this
    > >> newsgroup.
    > >>>> We have an internal wired network that DOESN'T use DHCP. All the

    client
    > >>>> windoze machines have their IPs set uniquely& their gateway& DNS
    > >>>> settings
    > >>>> pointing at a proxy server that gives internet access. I need to add
    > >>>> wireless capability to this network. So the access point has to be

    able
    > >> to
    > >>>> have a hardwired IP, gateway& DNS setting on it's wired side in the
    > >> same
    > >>>> way as all the existing clients and ideally it will have its own DHCP
    > >>>> server
    > >>>> on its wireless side. Is this possible, is there a name for this
    > >>>> particular
    > >>>> function& if so are there any recommendations for a box that will do
    > >>>> such.
    > >>>
    > >>> any normal wireless access point will perform these functions.
    > >>>
    > >>>> The boss has already wasted money on a wnr2000 Netgear router that,
    > >>>> presumably because it's a router doesn't seem to do the trick
    > >>>
    > >>> all you needed was an "access point" not a router - which just

    confuses
    > >> the
    > >>> issue
    > >>>
    > >>

    http://www.netgear.com/Products/Rout...utersandGatewa
    > >> ys/WNR2000.aspx
    > >>> you do understand the difference between a "wireless router" and
    > >>> "wireless
    > >>> access point" ?
    > >>
    > >> My networking skills are such that I wouldn't be certain of the
    > >> dictionary
    > >> definitions but realise that a router is probably overkill for this
    > >> situation.
    > >>
    > >>> If you wanted to just add a "wireless access point", why did the boss
    > >>> purchase a "router" ?
    > >>
    > >> Cos he's the boss ;-)
    > >> This happened before he involved me to try& sort things out.
    > >>
    > >>>
    > >>>> once you set
    > >>>> its IP address for the internal network it just seems to disappear.
    > >>>
    > >>> exactly how did you physically connect the "router" - which port did

    you
    > >> use
    > >>> ?
    > >>
    > >> One of its LAN PORTS linked into the internal network.
    > >>
    > >>> what does that mean - disappear ?
    > >>> you no longer see the IP address and can't ping it from the wired side

    ?
    > >>
    > >> Yes just that. Only way to get it back is to press the reset button&
    > >> lose
    > >> all the settings. One thing I am a little confused by with this box is
    > >> that
    > >> there is an IP addr under basic settings& then there's another one

    under
    > >> LAN settings& I'm not really sure what should go where.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks
    > >>
    > >>

    > > The IP address under basic settings will be the WAN port address. You

    will
    > > need to go to the LAN configuration settings to set the LAN IP address

    to
    > > one that corresponds to your network.
    > > What OS are the laptops going to use?
    > > If they are using Windows there is no need to use DHCP in the router or
    > > trying to get DNS to work there. If the laptops are also used elsewhere
    > > you can set them up to use DHCP for outside use but for your own network
    > > you could use the alternate config settings in TCP/IP to specify IP
    > > Address, gateway and DNS settings.
    > > see bottom of page:-
    > > <http://www.home-network-help.com/set-ip.html>

    >
    > grabbing the manual -
    > ftp://downloads.netgear.com/files/WN...UM_24FEB09.pdf
    >
    > yup -
    > the Basic Settings on section 1-4 - is for the WAN connection to an ISP
    >
    > the Customize Network Settings on section 4-1 is the local LAN side.
    > (defaults to 192.168.1.1)
    >
    > BTW - what IP address scheme are you using for the rest of your wired
    > network ?
    > ie - like 192.168.1.xxx ?


    Yes that exactly ^

    >
    > Since you have a small network -
    > just make sure that any DHCP address ranges are reset for just a couple of
    > devices,
    > are NOT being used by your wired static IP devices...
    >


    I assume that a DHCP server never blindly allocates an addr without sniffing
    to see if it's being used by a static device first? In any case, I see the
    Netgear box can be set to only allocate addrs between certain ranges if the
    above is a problem.

    I can only access the premises where this gear is at odd times so my next
    chance to attack it won't be until Monday.

    Thanks all



  20. #20
    DanS
    Guest

    Re: wireless access point - WNR2000 router

    > I assume that a DHCP server never blindly allocates an addr without
    > sniffing to see if it's being used by a static device first?


    Your assumption is most likely wrong.

    (I am not fully aware how all DHCP servers in all devices work, maybe some
    do check, but I've never seen it.)

Similar Threads

  1. Wireless access point question
    By Captain America in forum ms.public.windows.networking.wireless
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-04-09, 12:05 PM
  2. Bridge collapses
    By masonmarc@yahoo.com in forum alt.internet.wireless
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-19-09, 11:06 AM
  3. Access point or Bridge?
    By Concerned Cajun in forum Wireless Networks & Routers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-13-08, 05:15 PM
  4. Re: Odd problem: Belkin N1 access point, connected to our businessswitch, slows the net
    By smlunatick in forum ms.public.windows.networking.wireless
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-11-08, 09:28 AM
  5. DSL and Access Point
    By alex2761 in forum Networking Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-26-07, 01:34 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •