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Thread: Windows 2K3 R2 Server assistance needed

  1. #1
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    Question Windows 2K3 R2 Server assistance needed

    I've created a new user with the same privileges/permissions as all other standard users.

    However, this new user cannot save, create folders, or any other file-writing action to his personal folder on the server. He can open and read files without a problem.

    This seems to be an issue with this particular workstation, as the previous employee has the same issue. I've triple-checked services and settings, and they're all the same as the other computers who can perform these actions without issue.

    I've deleted the user, recreated him, checked his personal folder settings, etc.

    Not on a domain, just a simple workgroup.

    I've Oogled and Googled, but nothing I've found fixes this problem.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Imperial Impotentate brembo's Avatar
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    This is a wired connection?
    Tao_Jones Cult Member since 2004
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  3. #3
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Even viewer reveal any info? (from the workstation) Userenv or Autoenrollment errors?

    At the command prompt, run GPRESULT
    Output?

    Since you mention it follows a workstation and not just one user, perhaps the TCP stack/winsock is affected...some malware can affect DNS settings with redirection. A workstation MUST use the domain controllers IP address as its DNS server, not the ISPs DNS servers, not the router..but the DC. So, for example, if your server is 192.168.1.11, and you run an IPCONFIG /ALL from the workstation, the output of the text should show the DCs IP (192.168.1.11) as the DNS server for the workstation. Although an infected TCP stack/winsock may not reveal this, but try running a TCP/Winsock repair utility anyways.
    http://www.snapfiles.com/reviews/Win...sockxpfix.html

    Just to confirm....when you are sitting at the workstation and you hit ctrl+alt+del, and you have your login...hit the Option button and ensure the computer is logging into the domain, and not the local workstation netbios name (local login). (once a computer is set to log into the domain, there's usually never a reason to do a local login again)

    If you sit at this workstation and log into the domain as Administrator, can you fully browse and have read/write to the server? Can you browse the servers C$? Test with a start==>run==> \\servername\c$ or \\serverip\c$
    You should be able to view the entire C drive from the root, with that.
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  4. #4
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    G'ack...just reread your post..I see it's a simple workgroup.

    OK, lets start over. Without the question of "Why just a workgroup and not use your server like a real server".

    Still...event viewer errors?
    And the share that you're trying to get this full access too....
    N:\wfx32
    Is that set to share to each individual user? Or a local users group?

    Do you add local users on the server which match the username/password of the workstation users?
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
    G'ack...just reread your post..I see it's a simple workgroup.

    OK, lets start over. Without the question of "Why just a workgroup and not use your server like a real server".

    Still...event viewer errors?
    And the share that you're trying to get this full access too....
    N:\wfx32
    Is that set to share to each individual user? Or a local users group?

    Do you add local users on the server which match the username/password of the workstation users?
    Why a workgroup? It was set up that way when I came here, and the guy who did it is incommunicado. I don't know enough about server technologies to set up domains. All we use it for is a file server.

    Event viewer errors? Nothing pertaining to errors for write operations that I can see.

    The share? Is set to a local users group, all of whom have the same permissions. Each user has his/her own folder on the share for organizational purposes, but there is no restriction as to who can read/write.

    Username/Password: Each user has a unique username/password for the server, which is not the same as their workstation login.

    I'm thinking of just trying another computer altogether.

  6. #6
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burke View Post
    [B]
    The share? Is set to a local users group, all of whom have the same permissions. Each user has his/her own folder on the share for organizational purposes, but there is no restriction as to who can read/write.

    Username/Password: Each user has a unique username/password for the server, which is not the same as their workstation login.
    When setting up a server in "workgroup mode"...what I've always done is add local user accounts which exactly match the username and password used to log into each workstation that you need to access it.

    Example...say we have 3x workstations with username/password
    Workstation1: Burke/taxm@ster
    Workstation2ebbie/sausagequ33n
    Workstation3:YardofStuf/joble55

    I would add those exact 3 usernames 'n passwords to the local users group on the server.
    And then in the share, share to local users group.
    On the share level permission...share to "Everyone".
    On the NTFS permission of the share...(Security Tab)..THIS is where you whittle down your permissions.....have full rights to the Administrator, System, and then add your rights to the local users group or whatever group you like, or selecting individual users. Once that's done..remove the "Everyone" group.
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  7. #7
    SG MVP Lefty's Avatar
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    Workstation1: Burke/taxm@ster
    Workstation2ebbie/sausagequ33n
    Workstation3:YardofStuf/joble55


  8. #8
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lefty View Post
    Hah!
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  9. #9
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    After much banging of heads, we figured out the problem.

    We couldn't figure out why they couldn't write even though all the inherited permissions were the same; turns out, we weren't adding the new users under SHARE permissions as well.

    I guess I really should pick up a Windows 2K3 Server for Dummies book.

  10. #10
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    Isn't anyone pressuring you to go with 2008 server?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CableDude View Post
    Isn't anyone pressuring you to go with 2008 server?
    Are you kidding? We had a confab just to decide to order two cheapo keyboards the other day.

  12. #12
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burke View Post
    we weren't adding the new users under SHARE permissions as well..
    Best practice....don't double up on permissions...
    Leave Share to Everyone, full
    Whittle down your permissions under the Security tab, that's where the NTFS permissions come into play, which are the important ones.
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  13. #13
    A+, Security+, Mobility+ Shinobi's Avatar
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    Yep.. file / folder permissions can be a big pain in the @ss, especially if you have requests like jonny jones group wants to access these folders.. but I don't want to have them see those folders in there ect..
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