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Thread: Napster Bad?!?!

  1. #1
    Pirate?!?! Silver's Avatar
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    Post Napster Bad?!?!

    Well, last night me and a few others I talked to could not get on napster, at least in my area. This was in prime time for my area, bout 7 o`clock. I went to play Quake3, with pings of 50. A stable 50. All the way untill about 9:15, where then my ping jumped to 150-200. I leave the server, and lo and behold, napster is back up.

    Napster is a Good service in my opinion. I know I have leeched my fair share. But, It is the same as running an ftp server, and due to its popularity, EVERYONE has it. This clogs up both the up and down bandwidth, as people share all thier files and they arent really doing anything else other then dloading music, so uploading to them dont matter they dont really need the bandwidth anyway, they just dloading.

    I feel that when/if napster goes down, all the cable gamers that are experiencing the PEAK time lag will be fine and dandy again. This was proven in my eyes last night.

    Again, cant say im really against napster, I have used it alot myself, but I seriously believe for peak time slowdowns that Napster is the culprit. Imagine probably 60-70% ftp servers running on your node. Maybe more now that people know it might be closing. Thats alot of bandwidth, up and down. Which in turn kills the stability needed for gaming.

    So while napster has its place now. I as a gamer can really not wait untill it shuts its doors. Pings will be good, and I can get music someplace else.

  2. #2

    Angry

    Your 100% right about NAPSTER screwing up the internet.

    I live in a neighborhood with ALLOT of 10 - 20 yr old teens/young adults and for the past 8 months my pings have SUCKED. But gee... after the latest ruling against NAPSTER , my pings have improved somewhat. And isnt that a coincidence that napster users have gone doen quite abit at the same time.

    Also see this article about how LITTLE it takes to bring UPload and Download speeds to its knees:

    How the Upstream Cap can affect Downstream Speed
    Although downstream speeds are usually high (typically in the range of 768 Kbps to 1.5 Mbps), consumer-grade Cable or DSL service often has an upstream cap (artificial limit) of 128 Kbps, which is only about 3 times faster than a V.90 <http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm?term=V.90> (56K) dial-up modem, and a fraction of the downstream speed.
    What is not generally well-known is that the upstream cap can also affect the downstream speed -- if the upstream is saturated by uploading (e.g., sending a large PowerPoint file to the boss, or running a Napster <http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm?term=Napster> or other public service), the downstream will drop to about the same speed. This is due to a weakness in the basic TCP Internet protocol, not Cable or DSL per se, and not the service provider.
    Cable Internet is more vulnerable to this problem than DSL. Unlike DSL, where each subscriber has a dedicated connection to the head-end (DSLAM <http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm?term=DSLAM> ), the Cable Internet upstream path to the head-end (CMTS <http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm?term=CMTS> ) is shared by all subscribers on a given cable segment. If that upstream gets saturated, which might be caused by only a relatively few subscribers, downstream speeds take a big drop for all subscribers on that segment.
    As an illustrative example, consider a DOCSIS <http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm?term=DOCSIS> cable segment with 4 upstream channels per downstream channel, and 1000 subscribers (a recommended maximum).
    The upstream channels can be anywhere from 160 Kbps (200 kHz QPSK <http://www.cnet.com/Resources/Info/Glossary/Terms/qpsk.html> ) to 10 Mbps (3.2 MHz QAM <http://www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm?term=QAM> 16), with 800 Khz QPSK perhaps the most common in practice, giving an upstream channel capacity of 640 Kbps.
    The downstream channel can be 27 Mbps (QAM 64) or 36 Mbps (QAM 256), with 27 Mbps (QAM 64) perhaps the most common in practice.
    The aggregate upstream capacity of 4 channels would be about 2.5 Mbps, as compared to downstream capacity of 27 Mbps. If the upstream saturates, the downstream rate will drop to about the same speed, a dramatic slowdown of about 90% (2.5 Mbps as compared to 27 Mbps).
    Even with cable modems capped to 128 Kbps upstream, 2.5 Mbps upstream capacity can handle only 20 (2.5 Mbps / 128 Kbps) simultaneously active modems before saturation. That's generally not a problem if cable modem usage is typically (1) infrequent, (2) downstream [e.g., web surfing], and (3) interactive [e.g., fetch-use]. The system can break down if those conditions are not met.
    This makes it easier to see why certain Cable Internet providers condemn continuous use of upstream (e.g., running a popular public service) as "abuse" -- each such subscriber consumes capacity normally allocated for 1000 / 20 = 50 subscribers. Worse, there's a threshold effect: If the upstream is running at (say) 80% of capacity with typical subscribers, it takes only 4 (out of 1000) heavy upstream users at 128 Kbps to drive the upstream into saturation, thereby slowing downstream to a crawl for all subscribers on that segment. (Exact numbers, of course, depend on actual channel numbers and speeds.)
    For more information, see TCP Performance Implications of Network Asymmetry <http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-pilc-asym-03.txt>.
    ************

    Sombody PLEASE ring the death bell for Napster QUICK.... I like using napster until I found out how badly it hurt bandwidth for everyone. And I would rather GAME than listen to MP3s


    undefined

    [ 03-23-2001: Message edited by: Mr Winkie ]

  3. #3
    the ruined
    Guest

    Angry

    Ever since that ruling I cant even connect to napster on my cable modem but other people that I know aren't having any problems and somebody at my work said he has dsl thru Qwest I'm guessing and he couldnt connect. So I'm wondering WTF is going on here?

  4. #4
    winnerpl
    Guest

    Post

    on the flip side. napster is one of the primary reasons people got dsl/cable. once napster shuts down, there won't be a big need for teh high speed. that means less users higher prices in some areas. i haven't experienced any lag from my neighborhood's anpster use.

  5. #5
    sebanaj
    Guest

    Post

    yeah i agree totally! I just downloaded from Napster but, at 10AM, a file of 10MB in seconds!
    While at night, i can hardly reach 4KB/s and many connections with transfer error, etc
    And if i connect to my ISP ftp server i can only download Netscape at 180KB/s instead of 300/400!

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