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Thread: Wireless security

  1. #1
    JimL
    Guest

    Wireless security

    XP Pro SP4 upgraded to the minute. Thinkpad T42 & T60P. (I know, it
    reports SP3 but there are many SP4 updates in it.) Linksys router WRT160N
    V3. I've tried to learn networking for many years and my knowledge seems to
    be at a negative quantity. The scores of places to put variables are beyond
    me. Anything I have ever made work was following a step by step script.

    Hoping to make starting a wireless network easier, I started it with no
    security. I made the assumption that security could be added later. Am I
    correct in that assumption?

    Apparently the move didn't help. While each one has access to the internet
    wirelessly, the computers still don't see each other.

    I am told that one can't delete a workgroup, so if I can't add security to
    what I have I guess I'm stuck with rubbish on the computer.

    Thanks

    --
    For most of us the most danger is most politicians.

    JimL



  2. #2
    Big_Al
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    JimL said this on 12/14/2009 11:12 AM:
    > XP Pro SP4 upgraded to the minute. Thinkpad T42 & T60P. (I know, it
    > reports SP3 but there are many SP4 updates in it.) Linksys router WRT160N
    > V3. I've tried to learn networking for many years and my knowledge seems to
    > be at a negative quantity. The scores of places to put variables are beyond
    > me. Anything I have ever made work was following a step by step script.
    >
    > Hoping to make starting a wireless network easier, I started it with no
    > security. I made the assumption that security could be added later. Am I
    > correct in that assumption?
    >
    > Apparently the move didn't help. While each one has access to the internet
    > wirelessly, the computers still don't see each other.
    >
    > I am told that one can't delete a workgroup, so if I can't add security to
    > what I have I guess I'm stuck with rubbish on the computer.
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    You are right that setting up the wireless with no security is a first
    step and you CAN add security afterwards. It does take one variable
    out of the equation of getting a network up and running.

    Having access to a router/internet is different than file sharing.

    You can RENAME a workgroup, and I personally feel its easier to network
    if all are on the same workgroup. This is not exactly necessary, but
    I usually make a folder on every machine like C:/share and then share it
    with permissions for everyone. You may also have to enable file
    sharing.

    Go to http://ezlan.net/#Wireless for more ideas.

  3. #3
    JimL
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    "Big_Al" <BigAl@md.com> wrote in message
    news:uhlcvtNfKHA.1596@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > JimL said this on 12/14/2009 11:12 AM:
    >> XP Pro SP4 upgraded to the minute. Thinkpad T42 & T60P. (I know, it
    >> reports SP3 but there are many SP4 updates in it.) Linksys router WRT160N
    >> V3. I've tried to learn networking for many years and my knowledge seems
    >> to be at a negative quantity. The scores of places to put variables are
    >> beyond me. Anything I have ever made work was following a step by step
    >> script.
    >>
    >> Hoping to make starting a wireless network easier, I started it with no
    >> security. I made the assumption that security could be added later. Am
    >> I correct in that assumption?
    >>
    >> Apparently the move didn't help. While each one has access to the
    >> internet wirelessly, the computers still don't see each other.
    >>
    >> I am told that one can't delete a workgroup, so if I can't add security
    >> to what I have I guess I'm stuck with rubbish on the computer.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>

    >
    > You are right that setting up the wireless with no security is a first
    > step and you CAN add security afterwards. It does take one variable out
    > of the equation of getting a network up and running.
    >
    > Having access to a router/internet is different than file sharing.


    I don't doubt it's different, but it does show SOMETHING works.

    > You can RENAME a workgroup, and I personally feel its easier to network if
    > all are on the same workgroup.


    I couldn't find a way to rename it so I made a second one. Now I have dirty
    diapers on my computer.

    > You may also have to enable file sharing.


    Did that in step one. Not a clue what isn't right.


    > Go to http://ezlan.net/#Wireless for more ideas.



    Thanks

    --
    For most of us the most danger is most politicians.

    JimL



  4. #4
    Jack [MVP-Networking]
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    Hi
    Wireless security works well with SP2 too.
    Wireless security pertains only to the connection between the Wireless
    computer and the Router.
    If the Wireless computer can use the Internet through your Router, then the
    security is OK, and it is Not a factor in LAN Sharing problems.
    Make sure that the Software Firewall on each computer allows free local
    traffic. If you use 3rd party Firewall On, Vista/XP Native Firewall should
    be Off, and the active Firewall has to adjusted to your Network IP numbers
    on what is some time called the Trusted Zone (consult your 3rd Party
    Firewall instructions.
    General example, http://www.ezlan.net/faq#trusted
    Windows 7 Work Network,
    http://www.onecomputerguy.com/window...s7_sharing.htm
    Vista File and Printer Sharing-
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l.../bb727037.aspx
    Windows XP File Sharing -
    http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;304040
    Printer Sharing XP -
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...utt_july2.mspx
    Windows Native Firewall setting for Sharing XP -
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/875357
    Windows XP patch for Sharing with Vista (Not need for XP-SP3) -
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922120
    Sharing between Windows XP and Mac -
    http://www.realifewebdesigns.com/web...file-share.asp
    When done hard reboot all network computers and the Router.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking).


    "JimL" <invalid@invalid.inv> wrote in message
    news:hg5o53$t79$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > XP Pro SP4 upgraded to the minute. Thinkpad T42 & T60P. (I know, it
    > reports SP3 but there are many SP4 updates in it.) Linksys router WRT160N
    > V3. I've tried to learn networking for many years and my knowledge seems
    > to be at a negative quantity. The scores of places to put variables are
    > beyond me. Anything I have ever made work was following a step by step
    > script.
    >
    > Hoping to make starting a wireless network easier, I started it with no
    > security. I made the assumption that security could be added later. Am I
    > correct in that assumption?
    >
    > Apparently the move didn't help. While each one has access to the
    > internet wirelessly, the computers still don't see each other.
    >
    > I am told that one can't delete a workgroup, so if I can't add security to
    > what I have I guess I'm stuck with rubbish on the computer.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > --
    > For most of us the most danger is most politicians.
    >
    > JimL
    >
    >



  5. #5
    JimL
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    Thanks, I have a new problem. I found an option called "ID network." I
    opened it and ended up with something renaming my workgroup to "Workgroup,"
    so I did the same thing on my other laptop so they would have the same name.
    Ultimately I renamed them both back from "Workgroup" to my original name.

    The laptop I started this on ended up with no connection. I finally got a
    connection but am getting error notices that there is "a problem." The
    problem seems to be that something will not allow access unless I install
    security protocols first. I've set security to None to try to simplify
    getting access functional, then adding security later.

    How can I re-configure the whole thing, as if I were setting it up for the
    first time?


    "Jack [MVP-Networking]" <jack@discussiongroup.com> wrote in message
    news:eu2fEiPfKHA.656@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Hi
    > Wireless security works well with SP2 too.
    > Wireless security pertains only to the connection between the Wireless
    > computer and the Router.
    > If the Wireless computer can use the Internet through your Router, then
    > the security is OK, and it is Not a factor in LAN Sharing problems.
    > Make sure that the Software Firewall on each computer allows free local
    > traffic. If you use 3rd party Firewall On, Vista/XP Native Firewall should
    > be Off, and the active Firewall has to adjusted to your Network IP numbers
    > on what is some time called the Trusted Zone (consult your 3rd Party
    > Firewall instructions.
    > General example, http://www.ezlan.net/faq#trusted
    > Windows 7 Work Network,
    > http://www.onecomputerguy.com/window...s7_sharing.htm
    > Vista File and Printer Sharing-
    > http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l.../bb727037.aspx
    > Windows XP File Sharing -
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;304040
    > Printer Sharing XP -
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...utt_july2.mspx
    > Windows Native Firewall setting for Sharing XP -
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/875357
    > Windows XP patch for Sharing with Vista (Not need for XP-SP3) -
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922120
    > Sharing between Windows XP and Mac -
    > http://www.realifewebdesigns.com/web...file-share.asp
    > When done hard reboot all network computers and the Router.
    > Jack (MS, MVP-Networking).
    >
    >





    --
    For most of us the most danger is most politicians.

    JimL



  6. #6
    Lem
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    JimL wrote:
    > XP Pro SP4 upgraded to the minute. Thinkpad T42 & T60P. (I know, it
    > reports SP3 but there are many SP4 updates in it.) Linksys router WRT160N
    > V3. I've tried to learn networking for many years and my knowledge seems to
    > be at a negative quantity. The scores of places to put variables are beyond
    > me. Anything I have ever made work was following a step by step script.
    >
    > Hoping to make starting a wireless network easier, I started it with no
    > security. I made the assumption that security could be added later. Am I
    > correct in that assumption?
    >
    > Apparently the move didn't help. While each one has access to the internet
    > wirelessly, the computers still don't see each other.
    >
    > I am told that one can't delete a workgroup, so if I can't add security to
    > what I have I guess I'm stuck with rubbish on the computer.
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    As far as home users of Windows XP are concerned, there are two basic
    parts to setting up a network: (1) physically connecting the devices
    together and (2) configuring the software. You may have already
    completed some of the following, but I put it in for completeness.

    -----------------------

    With respect to step (1), keep in mind that there is no big mystery to
    wireless networking. All you are doing is substituting a radio link for
    an Ethernet cable. But for this substitution, there is no difference --
    which is why you can have both wired and wireless devices on the same
    local area network.

    The simplest way to create a home network is to use a router.

    When you first set up your router, you have to configure it to connect
    to your Internet Service Provider. If you have cable, the router may
    work out of the box with its default settings. If you have DSL, you
    usually have to enter your ISP userid and password. I assume that you've
    done this.

    Once the router is successfully communicating with your ISP, you start
    building your LAN. Connect at least one computer to one of the router's
    LAN ports. By default, Windows XP configures the Ethernet adapter
    (called Local Area Connection in Network Connections), to obtain an IP
    address automatically. Unless you've changed the default settings in
    your computer (or in the router's LAN configuration), as soon as you
    connect the Ethernet cable between your computer and the router, the
    connection should become active and you should be able to reach the
    Internet.

    If you now connect a second computer by Ethernet cable to the router, it
    too should immediately become active and be able to reach the Internet.

    You now have a Local Area Network that shares your Internet connection.

    ---------------------------

    You now have two optional steps: (1) replace one or both of the Ethernet
    cables connecting your computers to the router with a wireless link and
    (2) configure Windows to permit you to share files and printers between
    your computers. These steps are completely independent: you can do one
    or the other or both or neither.

    ----------------------------

    Setup wireless connectivity

    First, note that your router is capable of the most recent home wireless
    mode: Wireless-N (802.11N). Currently, there are 4 such modes: A, B, G,
    and N. Wireless-A is very rarely used these days in home equipment.
    Wireless-B also is old and is becoming less common in home equipment,
    but you may still find it in older laptops and older wireless adapters.
    Wireless-G still is very common, probably more common today than
    wireless-N. You router is backwards compatible with several of these
    older wireless modes, and can operate in Mixed (B,G,N), BG-Mixed (B,G),
    N Only, G Only, and B only.

    Using a computer connected to the router by cable, access the router's
    configuration utility by entering 192.168.1.1 in a web browser. Leave
    the Username blank; the default password is Admin (you should change
    this, but you can do so later). Go to the Basic Wireless Settings page
    and set the wireless mode to be consistent with the wireless adapters in
    your computers. Set a Network Name (SSID) to something that you will
    recognize other than your last name or address. Leave the rest of the
    settings at their defaults for now. Read the User Guide to determine if
    something other than the defaults might be more optimum for your
    particular situation. Click the Save Settings button.

    Go to the Wireless Security page and select "Disabled." After things are
    working, you will come back here and change this to WPA2-Personal (AES)
    (assuming that all of your computers can support WPA2-Personal; if not,
    use WPA-Personal (AES); if your computers are so old that their wireless
    adapters can't support WPA-Personal, get new wireless adapters). Click
    the Save Settings button.

    On the computer(s) that is (are) going to connect wirelessly, disconnect
    the Ethernet cable (if connected). Go to Network Connections and right
    click on the icon for your wireless adapter. Select Properties. Click on
    the Wireless Networks tab. Make sure that the box at the top to let
    Windows configure your wireless network is checked. If there are any
    entries in the list of Preferred networks, delete them. Click the View
    Wireless Networks button. You should see your network name (SSID) listed
    as an "Unsecured wireless network." If you don't see your SSID, click
    "Refresh network list" on the left. If you still don't see your SSID, or
    if you don't see *any* wireless network, be sure that the radio in your
    laptop is turned on. This may be a physical switch or a Fn+Fkey
    combination. If you do see your SSID, select it and click the Connect
    button. You should now connect wirelessly to the router and be able to
    reach the Internet.

    ---------------------------

    You now have a wireless network. If you get this far, go back to your
    router's configuration utility, using a computer connected by Ethernet
    cable, and set up the wireless security. The next time you try to
    connect, you should be asked for your passphrase.

    Note that the "security" that you're setting up by enabling encryption
    on the router only has to do with the security of the radio link(s)
    between your computer(s) and the router. It has *nothing* to do with any
    security if your computer(s) is (are) connected to the router with
    Ethernet cable(s) and has *nothing* to do with whether the computers can
    "see" each other or share files and printers.

    ---------------------------------

    Setting up file and printer sharing.

    You can do this while the computers are connected to the router by wire
    or wireless. It doesn't matter. What does matter is that before you
    attempt the following, you confirm that both computers can successfully
    reach the Internet. The following is some excellent (and, I think, easy
    to follow) advice on setting up file and printer sharing from MS-MVP Malke:

    <Quote>
    File/printer sharing

    Excellent, thorough, yet easy to understand article about File/Printer
    Sharing in Vista. Includes details about sharing printers as well as
    files and folders:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l.../bb727037.aspx

    For XP, start by running the Network Setup Wizard on all machines (see
    caveat in Item A below).

    Problems sharing files between computers on a network are generally
    caused by 1) a misconfigured firewall or overlooked firewall (including
    a stateful firewall in a VPN); or 2) inadvertently running two firewalls
    such as the built-in Windows Firewall and a third-party firewall; and/or
    3) not having identical user accounts and passwords on all Workgroup
    machines; 4) trying to create shares where the operating system does not
    permit it.

    A. Configure firewalls on all machines to allow the Local Area Network
    (LAN) traffic as trusted. With Windows Firewall, this means allowing
    File/Printer Sharing on the Exceptions tab. Normally running the Network
    Setup Wizard on XP will take care of this for those machines.The only
    "gotcha" is that this will turn on the XPSP2 Windows Firewall. If you
    aren't running a third-party firewall or have an antivirus with
    "Internet Worm Protection" (like Norton 2006/07) which acts as a
    firewall, then you're fine. With third-party firewalls, I usually
    configure the LAN allowance with an IP range. Ex. would be
    192.168.1.0-192.168.1.254. Obviously you would substitute your correct
    subnet. Do not run more than one firewall. DO NOT TURN OFF FIREWALLS;
    CONFIGURE THEM CORRECTLY.

    B. For ease of organization, put all computers in the same Workgroup.
    This is done from the System applet in Control Panel, Computer Name tab.

    C. Create matching user accounts and passwords on all machines. You do
    not need to be logged into the same account on all machines and the
    passwords assigned to each user account can be different; the
    accounts/passwords just need to exist and match on all machines. DO NOT
    NEGLECT TO CREATE PASSWORDS, EVEN IF ONLY SIMPLE ONES. If you wish a
    machine to boot directly to the Desktop (into one particular user's
    account) for convenience, you can do this. The instructions at this link
    work for both XP and Vista:

    Configure Windows to Automatically Login (MVP Ramesh) -
    http://windowsxp.mvps.org/Autologon.htm

    D. If one or more of the computers is XP Pro or Media Center, turn off
    Simple File Sharing (Folder Options>View tab).

    E. Create shares as desired. XP Home does not permit sharing of users'
    home directories or Program Files, but you can share folders inside
    those directories. A better choice is to simply use the Shared Documents
    folder. See the first link above for details about Vista sharing.

    F. After you have file sharing working (and have tested this by
    exchanging a file between all machines), if you want to share a printer
    connected locally to one of your computers, share it out from that
    machine. Then go to the printer mftr.'s website and download the latest
    drivers for the correct operating system(s). Install them on the target
    machine(s). The printer should be seen during the installation routine.
    If it is not, install the drivers and then use the Add Printer Wizard.
    In some instances, certain printers need to be installed as Local
    printers but that is outside of this response.
    </Quote>

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ap...0th/index.html

  7. #7
    JimL
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:%23GxAl6cfKHA.2164@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...

    Your post looks very good - the kind of thing I can follow. I've done a
    good chunk of it on one computer. Oddly on the second computer I ran into
    the screeching halt described below.

    >On the computer(s) that is (are) going to connect wirelessly, disconnect
    >the Ethernet cable (if connected). Go to Network Connections and right
    >click on the icon for your wireless adapter. Select Properties. Click on
    >the Wireless Networks tab.


    When I get to this point there IS NO Wireless Networks tab in the wireless
    adapter properties on this computer. It looks exactly like the properties
    for the wired connection.

    I've found quite a few things different about the XP Pro that came preloaded
    on this machine, but this is ridiculous. I'm guessing it may have to do
    with the fact that as of now the Intel Utility is in control instead of
    Windows. Unfortunately I haven't found how to switch it.

    --
    For most of us the most danger is most politicians.

    JimL



  8. #8
    Lem
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    JimL wrote:
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:%23GxAl6cfKHA.2164@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >
    > Your post looks very good - the kind of thing I can follow. I've done a
    > good chunk of it on one computer. Oddly on the second computer I ran into
    > the screeching halt described below.
    >
    >> On the computer(s) that is (are) going to connect wirelessly, disconnect
    >> the Ethernet cable (if connected). Go to Network Connections and right
    >> click on the icon for your wireless adapter. Select Properties. Click on
    >> the Wireless Networks tab.

    >
    > When I get to this point there IS NO Wireless Networks tab in the wireless
    > adapter properties on this computer. It looks exactly like the properties
    > for the wired connection.
    >
    > I've found quite a few things different about the XP Pro that came preloaded
    > on this machine, but this is ridiculous. I'm guessing it may have to do
    > with the fact that as of now the Intel Utility is in control instead of
    > Windows. Unfortunately I haven't found how to switch it.
    >


    Yes, it's either because your wireless adapter is turned off (check in
    Device Manager) or because the Intel PRO/Wireless utility is running.
    Usually, it's pretty easy to turn switch off. Right click the Intel
    PRO/Wireless icon in the notification area (it looks sort of like a
    flashlight pointing up) and select "Use Windows to manage wifi."

    You can, of course, use the Intel PRO/Wireless utility instead of
    Windows Wireless Zero Configuration. In fact, it will give you more
    control over certain features of your wireless adapter.

    Look in Device Manager to determine which model of Intel PRO/Wireless
    Adapter you have. The User Guides for 3 common models are here:
    http://www.intel.com/network/connect...ocs_mobile.htm

    If yours isn't one of the above, look on the Intel site, or just read
    one of the UGs above. For basic functions, I imagine that there's very
    little, if any, difference.

    If you decide to use Windows WZC instead of the Intel utility, make sure
    that the Intel utility isn't configured to start when Windows starts
    (check using msconfig (built-in) or autoruns from
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/s.../bb963902.aspx) AND that
    WZC is configured to start automatically (see http://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html)

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ap...0th/index.html

  9. #9
    JimL
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    Thank you very much. I'm up and running now. I got the Intel utility
    turned off and more done. On this morning's boot I had access.

    New question:

    In helps it says using Map Network Drive you can select a computer or
    folder. However I can find nothing about mapping the other computer - only
    about mapping a folder.

    Is it true that you can map the whole computer? In other words, how can I
    access and navigate the drive on the other computer directly as I did
    centuries ago via peer-to-peer crossover cable.

    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:OMauWZhfKHA.5608@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > JimL wrote:
    >> "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >> news:%23GxAl6cfKHA.2164@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >> Your post looks very good - the kind of thing I can follow. I've done a
    >> good chunk of it on one computer. Oddly on the second computer I ran
    >> into the screeching halt described below.
    >>
    >>> On the computer(s) that is (are) going to connect wirelessly, disconnect
    >>> the Ethernet cable (if connected). Go to Network Connections and right
    >>> click on the icon for your wireless adapter. Select Properties. Click on
    >>> the Wireless Networks tab.

    >>
    >> When I get to this point there IS NO Wireless Networks tab in the
    >> wireless adapter properties on this computer. It looks exactly like the
    >> properties for the wired connection.
    >>
    >> I've found quite a few things different about the XP Pro that came
    >> preloaded on this machine, but this is ridiculous. I'm guessing it may
    >> have to do with the fact that as of now the Intel Utility is in control
    >> instead of Windows. Unfortunately I haven't found how to switch it.
    >>

    >
    > Yes, it's either because your wireless adapter is turned off (check in
    > Device Manager) or because the Intel PRO/Wireless utility is running.
    > Usually, it's pretty easy to turn switch off. Right click the Intel
    > PRO/Wireless icon in the notification area (it looks sort of like a
    > flashlight pointing up) and select "Use Windows to manage wifi."
    >
    > You can, of course, use the Intel PRO/Wireless utility instead of Windows
    > Wireless Zero Configuration. In fact, it will give you more control over
    > certain features of your wireless adapter.
    >
    > Look in Device Manager to determine which model of Intel PRO/Wireless
    > Adapter you have. The User Guides for 3 common models are here:
    > http://www.intel.com/network/connect...ocs_mobile.htm
    >
    > If yours isn't one of the above, look on the Intel site, or just read one
    > of the UGs above. For basic functions, I imagine that there's very little,
    > if any, difference.
    >
    > If you decide to use Windows WZC instead of the Intel utility, make sure
    > that the Intel utility isn't configured to start when Windows starts
    > (check using msconfig (built-in) or autoruns from
    > http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/s.../bb963902.aspx) AND that
    > WZC is configured to start automatically (see
    > http://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html)
    >
    > --
    > Lem
    >
    > Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    > http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ap...0th/index.html




    --
    For most of us the most danger is most politicians.

    JimL



  10. #10
    Lem
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security

    JimL wrote:
    > Thank you very much. I'm up and running now. I got the Intel utility
    > turned off and more done. On this morning's boot I had access.
    >
    > New question:
    >
    > In helps it says using Map Network Drive you can select a computer or
    > folder. However I can find nothing about mapping the other computer - only
    > about mapping a folder.
    >
    > Is it true that you can map the whole computer? In other words, how can I
    > access and navigate the drive on the other computer directly as I did
    > centuries ago via peer-to-peer crossover cable.
    >
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:OMauWZhfKHA.5608@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> JimL wrote:
    >>> "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >>> news:%23GxAl6cfKHA.2164@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>
    >>> Your post looks very good - the kind of thing I can follow. I've done a
    >>> good chunk of it on one computer. Oddly on the second computer I ran
    >>> into the screeching halt described below.
    >>>
    >>>> On the computer(s) that is (are) going to connect wirelessly, disconnect
    >>>> the Ethernet cable (if connected). Go to Network Connections and right
    >>>> click on the icon for your wireless adapter. Select Properties. Click on
    >>>> the Wireless Networks tab.
    >>> When I get to this point there IS NO Wireless Networks tab in the
    >>> wireless adapter properties on this computer. It looks exactly like the
    >>> properties for the wired connection.
    >>>
    >>> I've found quite a few things different about the XP Pro that came
    >>> preloaded on this machine, but this is ridiculous. I'm guessing it may
    >>> have to do with the fact that as of now the Intel Utility is in control
    >>> instead of Windows. Unfortunately I haven't found how to switch it.
    >>>

    >> Yes, it's either because your wireless adapter is turned off (check in
    >> Device Manager) or because the Intel PRO/Wireless utility is running.
    >> Usually, it's pretty easy to turn switch off. Right click the Intel
    >> PRO/Wireless icon in the notification area (it looks sort of like a
    >> flashlight pointing up) and select "Use Windows to manage wifi."
    >>
    >> You can, of course, use the Intel PRO/Wireless utility instead of Windows
    >> Wireless Zero Configuration. In fact, it will give you more control over
    >> certain features of your wireless adapter.
    >>
    >> Look in Device Manager to determine which model of Intel PRO/Wireless
    >> Adapter you have. The User Guides for 3 common models are here:
    >> http://www.intel.com/network/connect...ocs_mobile.htm
    >>
    >> If yours isn't one of the above, look on the Intel site, or just read one
    >> of the UGs above. For basic functions, I imagine that there's very little,
    >> if any, difference.
    >>
    >> If you decide to use Windows WZC instead of the Intel utility, make sure
    >> that the Intel utility isn't configured to start when Windows starts
    >> (check using msconfig (built-in) or autoruns from
    >> http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/s.../bb963902.aspx) AND that
    >> WZC is configured to start automatically (see
    >> http://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem
    >>
    >> Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    >> http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ap...0th/index.html

    >
    >
    >


    I don't know what it means by mapping a computer. You could create a
    share for the root directory (e.g., C:\) and map that.

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ap...0th/index.html

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