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Thread: Wireless access point question

  1. #1
    Captain America
    Guest

    Wireless access point question

    I need a wireless access point that has more coverage area than the
    low-power access point included in the typical router.

    My router/access point is located in one corner of the house and I
    need to connect from a laptop in a room that's in the far corner of
    the house.

    As it stands now, the laptop connects but the signal strength shows
    only one bar and from time to time the connection drops.

    I assume I can:

    1. Purchase a much more powerful access point such as one used in
    public places -- restaurants, etc.
    2. Turn off the access point in the router.
    3. Connect the access point to the router and get a stronger signal
    around the house.

    I have tried:
    -- gain-type antennas on my router/access point -- no increase in
    signal strength.
    -- tried a range extender but it will not stay logged in to my
    wireless access point

    So, seems to me the only solution is a more powerful access point. I
    have seen some advertised as 4-watts of output, which I assume is
    several dB more of signal strength than the built-in access point on
    my router.

    Suggestions?

    Thanks.


  2. #2
    Jef Roe
    Guest

    Re: Wireless access point question


    "Captain America" <the_captain@america.com> wrote in message
    news:uhulg5h2am4pl15fqtohuto7lpevqfb9ac@4ax.com...
    >I need a wireless access point that has more coverage area than the
    > low-power access point included in the typical router.
    >
    > My router/access point is located in one corner of the house and I
    > need to connect from a laptop in a room that's in the far corner of
    > the house.
    >
    > As it stands now, the laptop connects but the signal strength shows
    > only one bar and from time to time the connection drops.
    >
    > I assume I can:
    >
    > 1. Purchase a much more powerful access point such as one used in
    > public places -- restaurants, etc.
    > 2. Turn off the access point in the router.
    > 3. Connect the access point to the router and get a stronger signal
    > around the house.
    >
    > I have tried:
    > -- gain-type antennas on my router/access point -- no increase in
    > signal strength.
    > -- tried a range extender but it will not stay logged in to my
    > wireless access point
    >
    > So, seems to me the only solution is a more powerful access point. I
    > have seen some advertised as 4-watts of output, which I assume is
    > several dB more of signal strength than the built-in access point on
    > my router.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >


    don't bother with all that, go for a Powerline/powergrid system. You will
    not regret it. After 10 years wireless I have just converted (4 comps) to a
    Comtrend Powergrid and its marvellous.



  3. #3
    Jack [MVP-Networking]
    Guest

    Re: Wireless access point question

    Hi
    It might be that there is No "Magic" Wireless Access Point thta would cover
    your environment.
    You best bet to try is this unit.
    Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 -
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833162134
    It has High Power Wireless output.
    If it does not cover then you need to build a special Wireless Network.
    The general approach that I take for Coverage issues is the following.
    The best way is to lay few CAT6 cables to central locations in the house,
    install Access Points, or Cable/DSL Routers configured as an Access Points
    ( Using a Wireless Cable/DSL Router as a Switch with an Access Point -
    http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html ), and connect them to the Main Router.
    You do not want/can not/hate/your client hate to lay Cables.
    You start with One affordable Router that can Do WDS (the reason for the WDS
    support is in case you need to add more Wireless hardware).
    If you are lucky and your environment is conducive to get covered with one
    Wireless Router you are done.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireles...ibution_System
    Using a Laptop loaded with Netstumbler, do a Wireless survey in the house,
    http://www.netstumbler.com/downloads/
    According to the Netstumbler's signal strength reading, identify spots that
    have strong signal. and spot with weak, or No signal.
    Evaluate how you can cover the space and start placing WDS units.
    Additional Wireless Routers in WDS Mode (Wireless Network - Configuration
    Modes. ) has to be placed in spots were the signal is good about Half way to
    the dead spots.
    How many WDS units are needed? It depends on your specific environment (that
    is a good the reason to buying WDS units one at the time, try it, and decide
    on the Next step).
    Otherwise.
    Extending Distance - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
    Wireless Router as an AP - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    Wireless Modes - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Modes.html
    Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking).

    "Captain America" <the_captain@america.com> wrote in message
    news:uhulg5h2am4pl15fqtohuto7lpevqfb9ac@4ax.com...
    >I need a wireless access point that has more coverage area than the
    > low-power access point included in the typical router.
    >
    > My router/access point is located in one corner of the house and I
    > need to connect from a laptop in a room that's in the far corner of
    > the house.
    >
    > As it stands now, the laptop connects but the signal strength shows
    > only one bar and from time to time the connection drops.
    >
    > I assume I can:
    >
    > 1. Purchase a much more powerful access point such as one used in
    > public places -- restaurants, etc.
    > 2. Turn off the access point in the router.
    > 3. Connect the access point to the router and get a stronger signal
    > around the house.
    >
    > I have tried:
    > -- gain-type antennas on my router/access point -- no increase in
    > signal strength.
    > -- tried a range extender but it will not stay logged in to my
    > wireless access point
    >
    > So, seems to me the only solution is a more powerful access point. I
    > have seen some advertised as 4-watts of output, which I assume is
    > several dB more of signal strength than the built-in access point on
    > my router.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >



  4. #4
    Frankster
    Guest

    Re: Wireless access point question


    "Captain America" <the_captain@america.com> wrote in message
    news:uhulg5h2am4pl15fqtohuto7lpevqfb9ac@4ax.com...
    >I need a wireless access point that has more coverage area than the
    > low-power access point included in the typical router.
    >
    > My router/access point is located in one corner of the house and I
    > need to connect from a laptop in a room that's in the far corner of
    > the house.
    >
    > As it stands now, the laptop connects but the signal strength shows
    > only one bar and from time to time the connection drops.
    >
    > I assume I can:
    >
    > 1. Purchase a much more powerful access point such as one used in
    > public places -- restaurants, etc.
    > 2. Turn off the access point in the router.
    > 3. Connect the access point to the router and get a stronger signal
    > around the house.
    >
    > I have tried:
    > -- gain-type antennas on my router/access point -- no increase in
    > signal strength.
    > -- tried a range extender but it will not stay logged in to my
    > wireless access point
    >
    > So, seems to me the only solution is a more powerful access point. I
    > have seen some advertised as 4-watts of output, which I assume is
    > several dB more of signal strength than the built-in access point on
    > my router.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >


    I would bite the bullet and install another access point at the other end of
    the house (or move the current one to be centrally located) using ethernet.
    So you would have either one centrally located access point or two on each
    end of the house.

    If you chose the route of two, you do need to know how to configure them, of
    course. If you are not familiar with this, any compentent consultant should
    be able to do it for you for one or two hours charge.

    -Frank


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