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Thread: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?

  1. #1
    ohaya
    Guest

    Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?

    Hi,

    Although I posted a little awhile ago, asking whether or not to wait to
    get some 11n equipment, I've been curious, and one of my laptops already
    has an 802.11n adapter (an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on
    sale (a Buffalo WHR-G300N), so I figured that I'd "dip my toes" into the
    11n waters.

    The Buffalo router arrived this week, and I've been testing with my laptop.

    At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    144mbps.

    I've been doing research on this, and found that:

    - The Buffalo router is a 2.4Ghz router only (but able to use either
    20Mhz or 40Mhz channels).

    - The 4965agn chipset is apparently designed to specifically not use
    40Mhz channels on 2.4Ghz.

    So, at least with the 4965agn, I'm limited to 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels.

    From searching and testing, it appears that I can't get >~130 -
    150mbps, but I have not been able to find any technical information that
    says that at 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels, the maximum connection speed is
    limited to <150mbps.

    So, I was wondering if anyone can either provide any definitive
    information or cite a reference about this, explaining why 150mbps is
    the limit for 11n using 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels?

    FYI, I have another 11n adapter, a Belkin PCCARD, and I was able to get
    270mbps connections, using 2.4Ghz and 40Mhz channels, but I guess that
    I'd like to either really understand why the 4965agn can't do that, or
    figure out how to get it to connect at >150mbps.

    Thanks,
    Jim


  2. #2
    ohaya
    Guest

    Re: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?



    ohaya wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Although I posted a little awhile ago, asking whether or not to wait to
    > get some 11n equipment, I've been curious, and one of my laptops already
    > has an 802.11n adapter (an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on
    > sale (a Buffalo WHR-G300N), so I figured that I'd "dip my toes" into the
    > 11n waters.
    >
    > The Buffalo router arrived this week, and I've been testing with my laptop.
    >
    > At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    > router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    > 144mbps.
    >
    > I've been doing research on this, and found that:
    >
    > - The Buffalo router is a 2.4Ghz router only (but able to use either
    > 20Mhz or 40Mhz channels).
    >
    > - The 4965agn chipset is apparently designed to specifically not use
    > 40Mhz channels on 2.4Ghz.
    >
    > So, at least with the 4965agn, I'm limited to 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels.
    >
    > From searching and testing, it appears that I can't get >~130 -
    > 150mbps, but I have not been able to find any technical information that
    > says that at 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels, the maximum connection speed is
    > limited to <150mbps.
    >
    > So, I was wondering if anyone can either provide any definitive
    > information or cite a reference about this, explaining why 150mbps is
    > the limit for 11n using 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels?
    >
    > FYI, I have another 11n adapter, a Belkin PCCARD, and I was able to get
    > 270mbps connections, using 2.4Ghz and 40Mhz channels, but I guess that
    > I'd like to either really understand why the 4965agn can't do that, or
    > figure out how to get it to connect at >150mbps.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Jim
    >



    Hi,

    I'm continuing to research the questions above, and I just found this
    for the Linksys WRT400:

    https://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs...specifications

    Note under "Receive Sensitivity", it shows:

    2.4GHz
    11Mbps: -86dBm @ Typical
    54Mbps: -71dBm @ Typical
    130Mbps (20MHz): -70dBm@ Typical
    270Mbps (40MHz): -66dBm@ Typical
    5GHz
    54Mbps: -67dBm @ Typical
    130Mbps (20MHz): -68dBm@ Typical
    270Mbps (40MHz): -62dBm@ Typical

    that *seems* to imply 130mbps connections with 2.4GHz/20Mhz, and
    >130mbps (i.e., 270mbps) connections only with 2.4Ghz/40Mhz and

    5Ghz/40Mhz.

    There's no explanation of why no >130mbps with 2.4Ghz/20Mhz though :(...

    Jim


  3. #3
    LR
    Guest

    Re: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?

    On 25/09/2009 22:49, ohaya wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Although I posted a little awhile ago, asking whether or not to wait to
    > get some 11n equipment, I've been curious, and one of my laptops already
    > has an 802.11n adapter (an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on
    > sale (a Buffalo WHR-G300N), so I figured that I'd "dip my toes" into the
    > 11n waters.
    >
    > The Buffalo router arrived this week, and I've been testing with my laptop.
    >
    > At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    > router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    > 144mbps.
    >
    > I've been doing research on this, and found that:
    >
    > - The Buffalo router is a 2.4Ghz router only (but able to use either
    > 20Mhz or 40Mhz channels).
    >
    > - The 4965agn chipset is apparently designed to specifically not use
    > 40Mhz channels on 2.4Ghz.
    >
    > So, at least with the 4965agn, I'm limited to 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels.
    >
    > From searching and testing, it appears that I can't get >~130 -
    > 150mbps, but I have not been able to find any technical information that
    > says that at 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels, the maximum connection speed is
    > limited to <150mbps.
    >
    > So, I was wondering if anyone can either provide any definitive
    > information or cite a reference about this, explaining why 150mbps is
    > the limit for 11n using 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz channels?


    The max data rate is dependent on a number of factors including channel
    width, suggest you do a search for 802.11n MCS rates.
    Only 0->7 were mandatory in the "n" draft.
    >
    > FYI, I have another 11n adapter, a Belkin PCCARD, and I was able to get
    > 270mbps connections, using 2.4Ghz and 40Mhz channels, but I guess that
    > I'd like to either really understand why the 4965agn can't do that, or
    > figure out how to get it to connect at >150mbps.

    You have already said " The 4965agn chipset is apparently designed to
    specifically not use 40Mhz channels on 2.4Ghz."
    It does state on the Intel site:-
    Friendly Neighbor Assurance
    Supports current Draft-N standard direction to support 40MHz channels
    only in 5GHz spectrum to minimize negative impact to legacy
    devices/networks nearby.
    <http://www.intel.com/network/connectivity/products/wireless/wireless_n/overview.htm>
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Jim
    >


    Simple "n" primer
    <http://www.airmagnet.com/assets/whitepaper/WP-802.11nPrimer.pdf>
    Designed for speed
    <http://www.arubanetworks.com/pdf/technology/whitepapers/wp_Designed_Speed_802.11n.pdf>

  4. #4
    alexd
    Guest

    Re: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?

    ohaya wrote:

    > I've been curious, and one of my laptops already has an 802.11n adapter
    > (an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on sale (a Buffalo WHR-G300N)


    > At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    > router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    > 144mbps.


    I'm curious. How do you get 130Mbps out of an AP with only 100Mbps ethernet?
    Are you using some sort of link aggregation [like LACP]?

    --
    <http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) (UnSoEsNpEaTm@ale.cx)
    19:50:28 up 28 days, 21:36, 8 users, load average: 0.23, 0.20, 0.18
    Qua illic est accuso, illic est a vindicatum


  5. #5
    LR
    Guest

    Re: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?

    On 26/09/2009 19:54, alexd wrote:
    > ohaya wrote:
    >
    >> I've been curious, and one of my laptops already has an 802.11n adapter
    >> (an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on sale (a Buffalo WHR-G300N)

    >
    >> At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    >> router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    >> 144mbps.

    >
    > I'm curious. How do you get 130Mbps out of an AP with only 100Mbps ethernet?
    > Are you using some sort of link aggregation [like LACP]?
    >

    He is probably referring to his wireless utilities reported link speed
    rather than actual data throughput. Given that his Intel adapter is
    restricted to 20MHz channels in the 2.4GHz band he is unlikely to get
    more than 80Mbps data throughput so there shouldn't be any problem with
    having only 100 Mbps Ethernet.

  6. #6
    ohaya
    Guest

    Re: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?



    alexd wrote:
    > ohaya wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I've been curious, and one of my laptops already has an 802.11n adapter
    >>(an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on sale (a Buffalo WHR-G300N)

    >
    >
    >>At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    >>router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    >>144mbps.

    >
    >
    > I'm curious. How do you get 130Mbps out of an AP with only 100Mbps ethernet?
    > Are you using some sort of link aggregation [like LACP]?
    >



    Hi,

    Sorry, but I probably wasn't being clear. The numbers I mentioned
    weren't for throughput. Those numbers were just what Windows (7) was
    showing for the connection speed. I haven't done any throughput type
    testing yet (e.g., with iperf). Since this is the 1st time I'm working
    with any 11n equipment, I'm just trying to get the connection "speed"
    numbers first.

    Jim


  7. #7
    ohaya
    Guest

    Re: Is it possible to get >150mbps with 11n on 2.4Ghz and 20Mhz?



    LR wrote:
    > On 26/09/2009 19:54, alexd wrote:
    >
    >> ohaya wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've been curious, and one of my laptops already has an 802.11n adapter
    >>> (an Intel 4965agn), and I was an 11n router on sale (a Buffalo
    >>> WHR-G300N)

    >>
    >>
    >>> At first, I was only able to get 54mbps, but after some tweaking of the
    >>> router and the adapter settings, I was able to get between 130mbps and
    >>> 144mbps.

    >>
    >>
    >> I'm curious. How do you get 130Mbps out of an AP with only 100Mbps
    >> ethernet?
    >> Are you using some sort of link aggregation [like LACP]?
    >>

    > He is probably referring to his wireless utilities reported link speed
    > rather than actual data throughput. Given that his Intel adapter is
    > restricted to 20MHz channels in the 2.4GHz band he is unlikely to get
    > more than 80Mbps data throughput so there shouldn't be any problem with
    > having only 100 Mbps Ethernet.



    LR,

    Yes, you're correct. That was what I meant...

    Jim


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