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Thread: Wireless security and XP

  1. #21
    Lem
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security and XP

    Gordon wrote:
    > "Gordon" <gbplinux@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:OXgaRC8jJHA.1168@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> Strange problem. My wife's laptop - XP SP2 cannot connect to our WAP
    >> that has WEP 128 bit security. She can connect to other wireless
    >> networks with (possibly) 64 Bit WEP. (I don't know the setup of this
    >> other network but I'm guessing at 64 bit from the password length).
    >> Does XP not connect to 128 bit WEP?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Thanks to all who responded - I've just found the answer. XP will NOT do
    > Shared Key whereas Vista will.
    >


    I glad that you got things working, but your conclusion is not correct.
    Windows XP certainly does support "shared key" encryption. In fact,
    the overwhelming majority of home wireless networks that are encrypted
    use this feature.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

  2. #22
    Gordon
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security and XP

    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:%23aBXgekoJHA.4372@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Gordon wrote:
    >> "Gordon" <gbplinux@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OXgaRC8jJHA.1168@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >>> Strange problem. My wife's laptop - XP SP2 cannot connect to our WAP
    >>> that has WEP 128 bit security. She can connect to other wireless
    >>> networks with (possibly) 64 Bit WEP. (I don't know the setup of this
    >>> other network but I'm guessing at 64 bit from the password length). Does
    >>> XP not connect to 128 bit WEP?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks to all who responded - I've just found the answer. XP will NOT do
    >> Shared Key whereas Vista will.
    >>

    >
    > I glad that you got things working, but your conclusion is not correct.
    > Windows XP certainly does support "shared key" encryption. In fact, the
    > overwhelming majority of home wireless networks that are encrypted use
    > this feature.
    >



    Well I've just converted my Tosh Netbook from Ubuntu to XP and that wouldn't
    connect to the Wireless EITHER - until I changed the WAP from Shared Key to
    Open.
    So something funny is going on...

    --
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    your OS, Service Pack level
    and the FULL contents of any error message(s)


  3. #23
    Lem
    Guest

    Re: Wireless security and XP

    Gordon wrote:
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:%23aBXgekoJHA.4372@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> Gordon wrote:
    >>> "Gordon" <gbplinux@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:OXgaRC8jJHA.1168@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >>>> Strange problem. My wife's laptop - XP SP2 cannot connect to our WAP
    >>>> that has WEP 128 bit security. She can connect to other wireless
    >>>> networks with (possibly) 64 Bit WEP. (I don't know the setup of this
    >>>> other network but I'm guessing at 64 bit from the password length).
    >>>> Does XP not connect to 128 bit WEP?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks to all who responded - I've just found the answer. XP will NOT
    >>> do Shared Key whereas Vista will.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I glad that you got things working, but your conclusion is not
    >> correct. Windows XP certainly does support "shared key" encryption. In
    >> fact, the overwhelming majority of home wireless networks that are
    >> encrypted use this feature.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Well I've just converted my Tosh Netbook from Ubuntu to XP and that
    > wouldn't connect to the Wireless EITHER - until I changed the WAP from
    > Shared Key to Open.
    > So something funny is going on...
    >


    Ahh. So *that's* what you did.

    I agree that the terminology is confusing. There is a difference
    between the method used for *authentication* and the method used for
    *encryption* of the wireless traffic once authentication has been
    established. If you are forced to use WEP (hardly effective these days)
    you should use "open" authentication (as you discovered). The following
    excerpt from a MS TechNet article may be of some interest:

    <quote: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb457016.aspx>
    The following types of authentication are available for use with 802.11
    networks:
    * Open System
    * Shared Key
    * IEEE 802.1X
    * WPA or WPA2 with preshared key
    Open system authentication is not really authentication, because all it
    does is identify a wireless node using its wireless adapter hardware
    address.
    ....
    Shared key authentication verifies that the wireless client joining the
    wireless network has knowledge of a secret key. During the
    authentication process, the wireless client proves it has knowledge of
    the secret key without actually sending the secret key. For
    infrastructure mode, all the wireless clients and the wireless AP use
    the same shared key. For ad hoc mode, all the wireless clients of the ad
    hoc wireless network use the same shared key.
    ....
    For a home or small business that cannot do 802.1X authentication, WPA
    and WPA2 provide a preshared key authentication method for
    infrastructure mode wireless networks. The preshared key is configured
    on the wireless AP and each wireless client. The initial WPA or WPA2
    encryption key is derived from the authentication process, which
    verifies that both the wireless client and the wireless AP are
    configured with the same preshared key. Each initial WPA or WPA2
    encryption key is unique.
    ....
    The following are the recommended security configurations, in order of
    most to least secure:
    ....
    * For the home or small business network that does not contain
    a domain controller and a RADIUS server and supports WPA2, use WPA2 and
    preshared key authentication.
    * For the home or small business network that does not contain
    a domain controller and a RADIUS server and supports WPA, use WPA and
    preshared key authentication.

    For the home or small business network that does not contain a domain
    controller and a RADIUS server and does not support either WPA or WPA2,
    use open system authentication and WEP. However, this is not a
    recommended security configuration and should only be used temporarily
    when transitioning to a WPA or WPA2-based wireless network.
    </quote>

    The article goes on to explain why shared-key authentication in
    conjunction with WEP is less secure than open authentication and WEP
    (aside from the fact that WEP is in general very easy to defeat these
    days) because it is easy for a sniffer to grab the key during the
    authentication process.


    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

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