Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: PIR interfering with wireless network

  1. #21
    Peter Hucker
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 21:49:12 -0000, Phillip Windell <philwindell@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > "Peter Hucker" <none@spam.com> wrote in message
    > newsp.uolaicah4buhsv@fx62.mshome.net...
    >
    >> Weird, I thought WAPS and NICs could be taken between countries and just
    >> work? If all the channels are different....

    >
    > Well,...kinda,...sorta,....maybe,...a little. The individual channnels are
    > probably the same,...it is the usuable range of channels (1-11 -vs- 1-13)
    > that is different.


    Ah I suppose the laptops would be fine, they just use whatever they find being transmitted. But if I brought my WAP over there on channel 13 I'd have the authorities hunting me down!

    > There are regional differences in electonic equipment. Heck even TV is
    > different,...with analog TV the UK is the PAL standard,..the US uses NTSC.
    > I'n not sure with Dgital TV what happens.


    One would hope they've taken the opportunity to make it compatible.....

    --
    http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

    A lawyer is an expert on justice in much the same way your average hooker is an expert on love.

  2. #22
    PeeGee
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    Phillip Windell wrote:
    > "Peter Hucker" <none@spam.com> wrote in message
    > newsp.uolaicah4buhsv@fx62.mshome.net...
    >
    >> Weird, I thought WAPS and NICs could be taken between countries and just
    >> work? If all the channels are different....

    >
    > Well,...kinda,...sorta,....maybe,...a little. The individual channnels are
    > probably the same,...it is the usuable range of channels (1-11 -vs- 1-13)
    > that is different.


    802.11 allows 1-13 I believe, though some countries have added a channel
    14 while others (mainly continental America) disallow 12 and 13.

    >
    > There are regional differences in electonic equipment. Heck even TV is
    > different,...with analog TV the UK is the PAL standard,..the US uses NTSC.
    > I'n not sure with Dgital TV what happens.
    >



    --
    PeeGee

    "Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
    knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
    to be removed from a computer easily."
    Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)

  3. #23
    Geoff Lane
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    Peter Hucker wrote:
    > We have a wireless network at work which appears to have gone downhill since the workmen installed PIRs for the burglar alarm. One of them in particular appears to cause dropped packets the closer a laptop is to it. Is this possible?? It's not a wireless PIR as far as I know, as I can see some leftover cable he was using which is a multicore (about 10 cores) type similar to phone systems, so I assume this is for the signal aswell as power. The person in that office swears blind that there were absolutely no problems until the PIR was installed above her desk, and now when I check, about 60% of the packets are being dropped. Moving her laptop to the opposite side of the room it drops only 5% of packets. PIRs used to just pick up infrared of your bodyheat, but I think now they are also motion sensors? Perhaps this means they are sending out a signal and bouncing it off you? Perhaps this could interfere with wireless networking?
    >


    If the remedies suggested in the other post don't work consider changing
    to the homeplug system.

    Geoff Lane

  4. #24
    Clint Sharp
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    In message <op.uok1gktq4buhsv@fx62.mshome.net>, Peter Hucker
    <none@spam.com> writes
    >We have a wireless network at work which appears to have gone downhill
    >since the workmen installed PIRs for the burglar alarm. One of them in
    >particular appears to cause dropped packets the closer a laptop is to
    >it. Is this possible?? It's not a wireless PIR as far as I know, as I
    >can see some leftover cable he was using which is a multicore (about 10
    >cores) type similar to phone systems, so I assume this is for the
    >signal aswell as power.

    They will likely be 'dual-tech' detectors, they use RADAR and PIR to
    detect intruders and only when both detect movement is the alarm
    triggered. It's to prevent falsing, the combination of both types is a
    quite neat solution to draughty rooms or rooms which have RADAR
    transparent walls.

    Don't know what band the RADAR usually uses but it would not surprise me
    in the slightest if they were 2.4GHz or some frequency that has
    harmonics in the 2.4GHz range.
    >d that there were absolutely no problems until the PIR was installed
    >above her desk, and now when I check, about 60% of the packets are
    >being dropped. Moving her laptop to the opposite side of the room it
    >drops only 5% of packets. PIRs used to just pick up infrared of your
    >bodyheat, but I think now they are also motion sensors? Perhaps this
    >means they are sending out a signal and bouncing it off you? Perhaps
    >this could interfere with wireless networking?
    >


    --
    Clint Sharp

  5. #25
    Peter Hucker
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2009 14:30:24 -0000, Geoff Lane <datemasde.t1m@gishpuppy.com> wrote:

    > Peter Hucker wrote:
    >> We have a wireless network at work which appears to have gone downhill since the workmen installed PIRs for the burglar alarm. One of them in particular appears to cause dropped packets the closer a laptop is to it. Is this possible?? It's not a wireless PIR as far as I know, as I can see some leftover cable he was using which is a multicore (about 10 cores) type similar to phone systems, so I assume this is for the signal aswell as power. The person in that office swears blind that there were absolutely no problems until the PIR was installed above her desk, and now when I check, about 60% of the packets are being dropped. Moving her laptop to the opposite side of the room it drops only 5% of packets. PIRs used to just pick up infrared of your bodyheat, but I think now they are also motion sensors? Perhaps this means they are sending out a signal and bouncing it off you? Perhaps this could interfere with wireless networking?
    >>

    >
    > If the remedies suggested in the other post don't work consider changing
    > to the homeplug system.


    Sorted anyway, but what is homeplug?


    --
    http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

    During her annual checkup, the well-constructed miss was asked to disrobe and climb onto the examining table.
    "Doctor," she replied shyly, "I just can't undress in front of you."
    "All right," said the physician, "I'll flick off the lights. You undress and tell me when you're through."
    In a few moments, her voice rang out in the darkness: "Doctor, I've undressed. What shall I do with my clothes?"
    "Put them on the chair, on top of mine."

  6. #26
    Peter Hucker
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2009 21:46:53 -0000, Clint Sharp <clint@clintsmc.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    > In message <op.uok1gktq4buhsv@fx62.mshome.net>, Peter Hucker
    > <none@spam.com> writes
    >>We have a wireless network at work which appears to have gone downhill
    >>since the workmen installed PIRs for the burglar alarm. One of them in
    >>particular appears to cause dropped packets the closer a laptop is to
    >>it. Is this possible?? It's not a wireless PIR as far as I know, as I
    >>can see some leftover cable he was using which is a multicore (about 10
    >>cores) type similar to phone systems, so I assume this is for the
    >>signal aswell as power.

    > They will likely be 'dual-tech' detectors, they use RADAR and PIR to
    > detect intruders and only when both detect movement is the alarm
    > triggered. It's to prevent falsing, the combination of both types is a
    > quite neat solution to draughty rooms or rooms which have RADAR
    > transparent walls.
    >
    > Don't know what band the RADAR usually uses but it would not surprise me
    > in the slightest if they were 2.4GHz or some frequency that has
    > harmonics in the 2.4GHz range.


    Harmonics then. Only that one detector out of loads of the same model caused a problem. Perhaps it was oscillating at half the correct frequency, or the harmonics weren't filtered out enough?

    --
    http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

    Someday we'll look back on all this and plough into a parked car.

  7. #27
    Mortimer
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    "Peter Hucker" <none@spam.com> wrote in message
    newsp.uoqtg9b84buhsv@fx62.mshome.net...
    >> If the remedies suggested in the other post don't work consider changing
    >> to the homeplug system.

    >
    > Sorted anyway, but what is homeplug?


    Ethernet over mains wiring: one device is connected by Ethernet to the
    router and plugged into the mains. Another device is plugged into mains
    wiring some distance away (eg in another room) and connected by Ethernet to
    a PC (or to several nearby PCs via a hub/switch).

    It is used as an alternative to wireless for carrying network traffic over a
    distance which it is difficult to span by Cat 5 cable.

    You can even connect a wireless access point to a remote Homeplug device to
    create a local wireless network beyond the rnage of a router's own wireless
    access point.



  8. #28
    rebel
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    On Mon, 02 Feb 2009 21:18:35 -0000, "Peter Hucker" <none@spam.com> wrote:

    >Sorted


    (snip)

    are you going to tell us how it was sorted, and what the problem was?

  9. #29
    Peter Hucker
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    On Mon, 02 Feb 2009 21:24:39 -0000, Mortimer <me@privacy.net> wrote:

    > "Peter Hucker" <none@spam.com> wrote in message
    > newsp.uoqtg9b84buhsv@fx62.mshome.net...
    >>> If the remedies suggested in the other post don't work consider changing
    >>> to the homeplug system.

    >>
    >> Sorted anyway, but what is homeplug?

    >
    > Ethernet over mains wiring: one device is connected by Ethernet to the
    > router and plugged into the mains. Another device is plugged into mains
    > wiring some distance away (eg in another room) and connected by Ethernet to
    > a PC (or to several nearby PCs via a hub/switch).
    >
    > It is used as an alternative to wireless for carrying network traffic over a
    > distance which it is difficult to span by Cat 5 cable.
    >
    > You can even connect a wireless access point to a remote Homeplug device to
    > create a local wireless network beyond the rnage of a router's own wireless
    > access point.


    I see. no use to use. We already have cat 5 (well 6) everywhere. The wireless is just for the convenience of people suing laptops all over the place.

    Working fine now I've had the detector replaced and changed the WAP to another channel.

    --
    http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

    Why do our kids have to take the Iowa Test for Basic Skills?
    Why can't we have a Georgia Test of Basic Skills with questions like,
    "Bubba's got three cars and he done traded for two more. How many cement blocks is Bubba gonna need?"

  10. #30
    Peter Hucker
    Guest

    Re: PIR interfering with wireless network

    On Tue, 03 Feb 2009 02:04:54 -0000, rebel <me@privacy.net> wrote:

    > On Mon, 02 Feb 2009 21:18:35 -0000, "Peter Hucker" <none@spam.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Sorted

    >
    > (snip)
    >
    > are you going to tell us how it was sorted, and what the problem was?


    The detector was faulty. Must have been emitting at a frequency that it shouldn't have, or perhaps too strongly? The replacement is fine. The installer was bewildered and had never seen it happen before.


    --
    http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

    __NNNNL_.
    JNNNNNNNNNNN.
    NNNNNNNNNNNNNN)
    JNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN.
    NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN)
    NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN)
    NNNN""NNNNF"4NNN)
    (NN NN) (NN
    4N. .NNL JN`
    NNNNNN(NNNNN)
    NNNNN (NNNN)
    "NNNNNNF`
    N.NNNN`N`
    (NL___NN
    _. `NNNNF
    (NNN. `NN` JNN
    (NNNNL .NNNN
    .NNNNNNNNL. .JNNNNNNL
    `NN" `"NNNNNL.JNNNN"` 4NN
    `4NNNNN"
    .JNNNNNNN.
    .NNNN" `NNNNL
    _NNNNNNN" `NNNNNNL.
    (NNNNNNF `NNNNNN
    4NNNNN (NNF"
    `" ``

Similar Threads

  1. Re: wireless network security protection
    By Jack \(MVP-Networking\). in forum ms.public.windows.networking.wireless
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-03-08, 11:20 PM
  2. Some questions about Wireless network connection properties
    By Delta in forum ms.public.windows.networking.wireless
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-15-08, 02:58 PM
  3. Because of my wireless card or the wireless network??
    By Mahalo in forum Wireless Networks & Routers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-17-07, 03:23 PM
  4. Mixing a wireless router and an ethernet switch. How?
    By jb22 in forum Networking Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-06-07, 05:57 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •