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Thread: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

  1. #1
    james
    Guest

    how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that already has a
    wired router, how do I configure the wireless router so the computers in the
    wired LAN can ping the computers on the wireless router? In other words,
    make the wireless router transparent so the wired LAN and the wireless LAN
    behave like one LAN.

    I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose. What if
    mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?


  2. #2
    Ft. Couch! morbidpete's Avatar
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    dd-wrt

  3. #3
    ray
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    "james" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message news:gfpmgo$7gg$1@aioe.org...
    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that already has
    > a wired router, how do I configure the wireless router so the computers in
    > the wired LAN can ping the computers on the wireless router? In other
    > words, make the wireless router transparent so the wired LAN and the
    > wireless LAN behave like one LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose. What if
    > mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?

    I did not have the answer, but i believe you will have answers if you tell
    the group about your routers types.



  4. #4
    ray
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    "james" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message news:gfpmgo$7gg$1@aioe.org...
    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that already has
    > a wired router, how do I configure the wireless router so the computers in
    > the wired LAN can ping the computers on the wireless router? In other
    > words, make the wireless router transparent so the wired LAN and the
    > wireless LAN behave like one LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose. What if
    > mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?

    I did not have the answer, but i believe you will have answers if you tell
    the group about your routers types.



  5. #5
    John Carter
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    "james" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in news:gfpmgo$7gg$1@aioe.org:

    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that
    > already has a wired router, how do I configure the wireless router
    > so the computers in the wired LAN can ping the computers on the
    > wireless router? In other words, make the wireless router
    > transparent so the wired LAN and the wireless LAN behave like one
    > LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose.
    > What if mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?
    >


    I have a Netgear FVS338 wired only VPN router connected to my cable
    modem. I have a
    Linksys WRT54G ( wireless and wired) connected up to the FVG338, but
    the cable from the FVG338 is connected to a standard port (NOT the
    WAN/INTERNET port).
    The WRT54G is set p to obtain an address from the FVS338, which is my
    DHCP server for all the network.

    I can PING and share files with wireless computers and wired ones,
    which are connected to the FVS338.

    My limited understanding of the situation is that the WRT54G serves
    ONLY as a wireless/wired access point that is it does NO router stuff.
    If connected thru the WAN/INTERNET port, it does routing also.

    This may not be entirely correct, so someone please smarten me up.

  6. #6
    John Carter
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    "james" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in news:gfpmgo$7gg$1@aioe.org:

    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that
    > already has a wired router, how do I configure the wireless router
    > so the computers in the wired LAN can ping the computers on the
    > wireless router? In other words, make the wireless router
    > transparent so the wired LAN and the wireless LAN behave like one
    > LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose.
    > What if mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?
    >


    I have a Netgear FVS338 wired only VPN router connected to my cable
    modem. I have a
    Linksys WRT54G ( wireless and wired) connected up to the FVG338, but
    the cable from the FVG338 is connected to a standard port (NOT the
    WAN/INTERNET port).
    The WRT54G is set p to obtain an address from the FVS338, which is my
    DHCP server for all the network.

    I can PING and share files with wireless computers and wired ones,
    which are connected to the FVS338.

    My limited understanding of the situation is that the WRT54G serves
    ONLY as a wireless/wired access point that is it does NO router stuff.
    If connected thru the WAN/INTERNET port, it does routing also.

    This may not be entirely correct, so someone please smarten me up.

  7. #7
    Smiles
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    1.Home Networking Wired + Wireless Connections

    The simplest way to set up a home network, including both computers with
    wired connections and computers with wireless connections, is to set up
    a wireless router immediately following your DSL modem or Cable modem.
    Sometimes, a DSL modem even has the router built into it.
    In this setup, all the computers are assigned their IP addresses by the
    DHCP server that is built into the router. All are on the same logical
    network. However, their ability to share files, printers, and otherwise
    communicate between each other will depend on your settings in each
    computer.
    In order to share files, you have to tell Windows (or Linux, etc.) to
    enable file and printer sharing, identify which directories should be
    shared, and have the computers on the same Windows Workgroup (or Windows
    domain, if you're a very advanced user running a Windows domain
    controller). You'll also have to tell the firewall programs on each
    computer to allow the sharing with the other computers or the firewall
    will block the data.

    A wireless router can be used along with a wired router, if you like.
    You can use it to add additional wired ports (wireless routers usually
    have 4 LAN (Local Area Network) ports as well as wireless ports. You can
    configure it so that you can share files and printers among the wired
    and wireless machines.
    In order to have a combined network so you can share files and printers,
    you must only have one DHCP server running either on the wired router
    or on the wireless router, but not on both. You will need to use an
    Ethernet cable to plug one of the LAN ports on the wireless router into
    one of the LAN ports on the wired Cable/DSL router.
    In this one-network configuration, you will need to turn off the DHCP
    server that is built into the router. Although you don't have to, you
    should set a static IP address in the wireless router, just so you'll be
    able to find it with your web browser when you want to change its
    configuration.
    Tech Tip
    Both of these steps will need to be done while you are directly
    connected to the router. Change the IP address to a fixed one, e.g.
    192.168.1.254/255.255.255.0 on the wireless router, and assuming that
    the wired router's DHCP server is assigning ranges in the 192.168.1.x
    range. Then, Disable the DHCP server in the wireless router.
    Then, go back to the wired router and exclude the address (that you just
    assigned to the wireless router) from the range that the wired router's
    DHCP server manages. Otherwise, you might find that the wired router
    assigned that address to another computer which would interfere with
    the connections of that other computer and all your wireless computers.
    Once all the connections work, don't forget to set up the wireless
    security settings on your wireless router and your computer.
    2.Home Networking Protecting Wired Computers from Wireless

    In a variation on wireless networking, you can use the wireless router
    to provide Internet access and file & printer sharing between wireless
    computers, while isolating the wireless network from the wired network
    By changing the order in which the wireless router and the wired router
    are connected, a wireless router can be used to segregate wireless
    computers from wired computers in your network. In this manner, you can
    prevent file and printer sharing and any other type of direct contact
    between the wired and wireless computers.
    You might want to do this for security reasons. For example, if you
    normally connect a laptop computer using an Ethernet cable, you could
    set segregate the networks in case someone manages to gain unauthorized
    access to your wireless network.
    The first part of trick to segregating the networks is to connect the
    WAN (Wide Area Network) port on the wireless router to a LAN (Local Area
    Network) port on the Cable/DSL modem. That's the same connection you'd
    make with a wired router, if you were only using it or were wanting to
    protect the wireless computers from the wired computers.
    This connection will cause the Wireless router to get its IP address
    assigned by the upstream network's DHCP server (typically, a cable
    Internet Sevice Provider or a DSL provider).
    The DHCP server within the wireless router should be ON for this setp,
    as we'll use it to assign IP addresses to the wireless computers and to
    the wired Cable/DSL router.
    Then, connect the WAN port on the Cable/DSL router to a LAN port on the
    wireless router. This will make the Cable/DSL router get its "upstream"
    (WAN) IP address from the wireless router.
    The DHCP server within the wired Cable/DSL router should also be turned
    ON. It should also be set to a different IP address range than that
    being used by the Wireless router. Linksys normally has these set
    differently by default: the wireless router uses
    192.168.1.x/255.255.255.0, while the wired router uses
    192.168.0.x/255.255.255.0.
    The bottom line of this configuration is that the wireless computers
    will be unable to route any connection attempts past the WAN port on the
    wired router. The wired computers should not be able, but may be able,
    to initiate connections to (and get responses from) the wireless computers.
    Tech Tip
    Routers should not send outbound any requests that are attempting to
    contact one of the IP address ranges that are reserved for private
    networks (e.g., 192.168.x.y/255.255.0.0); however, manufacturers of
    consumer-grade home routers may not implement that block.
    3.Home Networking Protecting Wireless Computers from Wired Computers

    A wireless router can also be used to segregate wireless computers from
    wired computers in your network. In this manner, you can prevent file
    and printer sharing and any other type of direct contact between the
    wired and wireless computers.
    You won't be able to use any of the printers on the wired network from a
    computer on the wireless network or vice versa. Similarly, you won't be
    able to share files either way.
    You set up this network very similarly to the way you would to protect
    the wireless computers from the wired computers. You just reverse the
    order of the wired and wireless routers.
    The first part of trick to segregating the networks is to connect the
    WAN (Wide Area Network) port on the wired router to a LAN (Local Area
    Network) port on the Cable/DSL modem. That's the same connection you'd
    make with a wireless router, if you were only using it or were wanting
    to protect the wired computers from the wireless computers.
    This connection will cause the Wireless router to get its IP address
    assigned by the upstream network's DHCP server (typically, a cable
    Internet Sevice Provider or a DSL provider).
    The DHCP server within the wireless router should be ON for this setp,
    as we'll use it to assign IP addresses to the wireless computers and to
    the wired Cable/DSL router.
    Then, connect the WAN port on the wireless router to a LAN port on the
    wired router. This will make the wireless router get its "upstream"
    (WAN) IP address from the wired router.
    The DHCP server within the wireless Cable/DSL router should also be
    turned ON. It should also be set to a different IP address range than
    that being used by the Wired router. Linksys normally has these set
    differently by default: the wireless router uses
    192.168.1.x/255.255.255.0, while the wired router uses
    192.168.0.x/255.255.255.0.
    The bottom line of this configuration is that the wired computers will
    be unable to route any connection attempts past the WAN port on the
    wireless router. The wireless computers should not be able, but may be
    able, to initiate connections to (and get responses from) the wireless
    computers.
    Tech Tip
    Routers should not send outbound any requests that are attempting to
    contact one of the IP address ranges that are reserved for private
    networks (e.g., 192.168.x.y/255.255.0.0); however, manufacturers of
    consumer-grade home routers may not implement that block.




    james wrote:
    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that already has a
    > wired router, how do I configure the wireless router so the computers in the
    > wired LAN can ping the computers on the wireless router? In other words,
    > make the wireless router transparent so the wired LAN and the wireless LAN
    > behave like one LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose. What if
    > mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?
    >


  8. #8
    Smiles
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    1.Home Networking Wired + Wireless Connections

    The simplest way to set up a home network, including both computers with
    wired connections and computers with wireless connections, is to set up
    a wireless router immediately following your DSL modem or Cable modem.
    Sometimes, a DSL modem even has the router built into it.
    In this setup, all the computers are assigned their IP addresses by the
    DHCP server that is built into the router. All are on the same logical
    network. However, their ability to share files, printers, and otherwise
    communicate between each other will depend on your settings in each
    computer.
    In order to share files, you have to tell Windows (or Linux, etc.) to
    enable file and printer sharing, identify which directories should be
    shared, and have the computers on the same Windows Workgroup (or Windows
    domain, if you're a very advanced user running a Windows domain
    controller). You'll also have to tell the firewall programs on each
    computer to allow the sharing with the other computers or the firewall
    will block the data.

    A wireless router can be used along with a wired router, if you like.
    You can use it to add additional wired ports (wireless routers usually
    have 4 LAN (Local Area Network) ports as well as wireless ports. You can
    configure it so that you can share files and printers among the wired
    and wireless machines.
    In order to have a combined network so you can share files and printers,
    you must only have one DHCP server running either on the wired router
    or on the wireless router, but not on both. You will need to use an
    Ethernet cable to plug one of the LAN ports on the wireless router into
    one of the LAN ports on the wired Cable/DSL router.
    In this one-network configuration, you will need to turn off the DHCP
    server that is built into the router. Although you don't have to, you
    should set a static IP address in the wireless router, just so you'll be
    able to find it with your web browser when you want to change its
    configuration.
    Tech Tip
    Both of these steps will need to be done while you are directly
    connected to the router. Change the IP address to a fixed one, e.g.
    192.168.1.254/255.255.255.0 on the wireless router, and assuming that
    the wired router's DHCP server is assigning ranges in the 192.168.1.x
    range. Then, Disable the DHCP server in the wireless router.
    Then, go back to the wired router and exclude the address (that you just
    assigned to the wireless router) from the range that the wired router's
    DHCP server manages. Otherwise, you might find that the wired router
    assigned that address to another computer which would interfere with
    the connections of that other computer and all your wireless computers.
    Once all the connections work, don't forget to set up the wireless
    security settings on your wireless router and your computer.
    2.Home Networking Protecting Wired Computers from Wireless

    In a variation on wireless networking, you can use the wireless router
    to provide Internet access and file & printer sharing between wireless
    computers, while isolating the wireless network from the wired network
    By changing the order in which the wireless router and the wired router
    are connected, a wireless router can be used to segregate wireless
    computers from wired computers in your network. In this manner, you can
    prevent file and printer sharing and any other type of direct contact
    between the wired and wireless computers.
    You might want to do this for security reasons. For example, if you
    normally connect a laptop computer using an Ethernet cable, you could
    set segregate the networks in case someone manages to gain unauthorized
    access to your wireless network.
    The first part of trick to segregating the networks is to connect the
    WAN (Wide Area Network) port on the wireless router to a LAN (Local Area
    Network) port on the Cable/DSL modem. That's the same connection you'd
    make with a wired router, if you were only using it or were wanting to
    protect the wireless computers from the wired computers.
    This connection will cause the Wireless router to get its IP address
    assigned by the upstream network's DHCP server (typically, a cable
    Internet Sevice Provider or a DSL provider).
    The DHCP server within the wireless router should be ON for this setp,
    as we'll use it to assign IP addresses to the wireless computers and to
    the wired Cable/DSL router.
    Then, connect the WAN port on the Cable/DSL router to a LAN port on the
    wireless router. This will make the Cable/DSL router get its "upstream"
    (WAN) IP address from the wireless router.
    The DHCP server within the wired Cable/DSL router should also be turned
    ON. It should also be set to a different IP address range than that
    being used by the Wireless router. Linksys normally has these set
    differently by default: the wireless router uses
    192.168.1.x/255.255.255.0, while the wired router uses
    192.168.0.x/255.255.255.0.
    The bottom line of this configuration is that the wireless computers
    will be unable to route any connection attempts past the WAN port on the
    wired router. The wired computers should not be able, but may be able,
    to initiate connections to (and get responses from) the wireless computers.
    Tech Tip
    Routers should not send outbound any requests that are attempting to
    contact one of the IP address ranges that are reserved for private
    networks (e.g., 192.168.x.y/255.255.0.0); however, manufacturers of
    consumer-grade home routers may not implement that block.
    3.Home Networking Protecting Wireless Computers from Wired Computers

    A wireless router can also be used to segregate wireless computers from
    wired computers in your network. In this manner, you can prevent file
    and printer sharing and any other type of direct contact between the
    wired and wireless computers.
    You won't be able to use any of the printers on the wired network from a
    computer on the wireless network or vice versa. Similarly, you won't be
    able to share files either way.
    You set up this network very similarly to the way you would to protect
    the wireless computers from the wired computers. You just reverse the
    order of the wired and wireless routers.
    The first part of trick to segregating the networks is to connect the
    WAN (Wide Area Network) port on the wired router to a LAN (Local Area
    Network) port on the Cable/DSL modem. That's the same connection you'd
    make with a wireless router, if you were only using it or were wanting
    to protect the wired computers from the wireless computers.
    This connection will cause the Wireless router to get its IP address
    assigned by the upstream network's DHCP server (typically, a cable
    Internet Sevice Provider or a DSL provider).
    The DHCP server within the wireless router should be ON for this setp,
    as we'll use it to assign IP addresses to the wireless computers and to
    the wired Cable/DSL router.
    Then, connect the WAN port on the wireless router to a LAN port on the
    wired router. This will make the wireless router get its "upstream"
    (WAN) IP address from the wired router.
    The DHCP server within the wireless Cable/DSL router should also be
    turned ON. It should also be set to a different IP address range than
    that being used by the Wired router. Linksys normally has these set
    differently by default: the wireless router uses
    192.168.1.x/255.255.255.0, while the wired router uses
    192.168.0.x/255.255.255.0.
    The bottom line of this configuration is that the wired computers will
    be unable to route any connection attempts past the WAN port on the
    wireless router. The wireless computers should not be able, but may be
    able, to initiate connections to (and get responses from) the wireless
    computers.
    Tech Tip
    Routers should not send outbound any requests that are attempting to
    contact one of the IP address ranges that are reserved for private
    networks (e.g., 192.168.x.y/255.255.0.0); however, manufacturers of
    consumer-grade home routers may not implement that block.




    james wrote:
    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that already has a
    > wired router, how do I configure the wireless router so the computers in the
    > wired LAN can ping the computers on the wireless router? In other words,
    > make the wireless router transparent so the wired LAN and the wireless LAN
    > behave like one LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose. What if
    > mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?
    >


  9. #9
    John Carter
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    Smiles <smile_inspector@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:JVhUk.354$re.184@read1.cgocable.net:

    > 1.Home Networking Wired + Wireless Connections
    >
    > The simplest way to set up a home network, including both



    <<<<snip>>>>>

    I believe it is appropriate that you reference and provie
    credit to the author of your follow-up, so the OP can find
    the book and do further reading.

    Was this from "Networking for Dummies" ?

    John Carter

  10. #10
    John Carter
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    Smiles <smile_inspector@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:JVhUk.354$re.184@read1.cgocable.net:

    > 1.Home Networking Wired + Wireless Connections
    >
    > The simplest way to set up a home network, including both



    <<<<snip>>>>>

    I believe it is appropriate that you reference and provie
    credit to the author of your follow-up, so the OP can find
    the book and do further reading.

    Was this from "Networking for Dummies" ?

    John Carter

  11. #11
    Ray
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    james wrote:
    > When attaching a wireless router w/spi firewall to a LAN that already
    > has a wired router, how do I configure the wireless router so the
    > computers in the wired LAN can ping the computers on the wireless
    > router? In other words, make the wireless router transparent so the
    > wired LAN and the wireless LAN behave like one LAN.
    >
    > I believe some wireless router has a bridge mode for this purpose. What
    > if mine doesn't have bridge mode, can this still be done?



    Using a wireless router such as the Linksys WRT54G family is fairly
    straightforward. The Linksys WRT54G is to function only as an access
    point. In the Linksys WRT54g admin setup TURN OFF DHCP Server function,
    assign the Linksys WRT54g a static ip outside of the ip range on your
    wired router (example if wired router uses 192.18.0.10 -192.168.0.100
    then assign an ip address higher than 192.168.0.100 ). Make sure same
    subnet is used. Next setup the wireless section of the WRT54G as normal
    (follow manual) using the highest encryption available usually WPA-PSK
    or WPA II with a unique 63 bit key for access point and wireless
    client(s) side (PC). Finally connect the WRT54G to the wired router via
    a regular Cat 5 or better patch cable from standard LAN port (not WAN)
    to standard LAN port. If neither LAN port has automatic crossover
    function then use a Cat 5 or better crossover patch cable.

    The wireless router will be transparent so that the wired LAN and the
    wireless will function as one LAN

    If there are any terms you are unfamiliar with just google it.

    Ray

  12. #12
    Smiles
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    this was forwarded to me by my school they gave me this

    http://www.terryscomputertips.com/ar...s_20081116.php

    John Carter wrote:
    > Smiles <smile_inspector@hotmail.com> wrote in
    > news:JVhUk.354$re.184@read1.cgocable.net:
    >
    >> 1.Home Networking Wired + Wireless Connections
    >>
    >> The simplest way to set up a home network, including both

    >
    >
    > <<<<snip>>>>>
    >
    > I believe it is appropriate that you reference and provie
    > credit to the author of your follow-up, so the OP can find
    > the book and do further reading.
    >
    > Was this from "Networking for Dummies" ?
    >
    > John Carter


  13. #13
    Smiles
    Guest

    Re: how to turn a wireless router into a wireless bridge?

    this was forwarded to me by my school they gave me this

    http://www.terryscomputertips.com/ar...s_20081116.php

    John Carter wrote:
    > Smiles <smile_inspector@hotmail.com> wrote in
    > news:JVhUk.354$re.184@read1.cgocable.net:
    >
    >> 1.Home Networking Wired + Wireless Connections
    >>
    >> The simplest way to set up a home network, including both

    >
    >
    > <<<<snip>>>>>
    >
    > I believe it is appropriate that you reference and provie
    > credit to the author of your follow-up, so the OP can find
    > the book and do further reading.
    >
    > Was this from "Networking for Dummies" ?
    >
    > John Carter


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