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Thread: 15 Element Wi-Fi Yagi

  1. #1
    ab9il.worldwide@gmail.com
    Guest

    15 Element Wi-Fi Yagi

    Okay guys and gals, it's done. After lots of e-mails asking about a
    good Wi-Fi antenna that is simple to build and still beats the
    cantennas and wok-tops: http:www.ab9il.net/wlan-projects/
    wifi6.html . Gain is around 15 dBi, and it is made of wood, wire, and
    a pigtail.

    Enjoy!

    Phil
    http://www.ab9il.net/

  2. #2
    Jeff Liebermann
    Guest

    Re: 15 Element Wi-Fi Yagi

    On Fri, 24 Oct 2008 08:21:57 -0700 (PDT), ab9il.worldwide@gmail.com
    wrote:

    >Okay guys and gals, it's done. After lots of e-mails asking about a
    >good Wi-Fi antenna that is simple to build and still beats the
    >cantennas and wok-tops: http:www.ab9il.net/wlan-projects/
    >wifi6.html . Gain is around 15 dBi, and it is made of wood, wire, and
    >a pigtail.
    >
    >Enjoy!
    >
    >Phil
    >http://www.ab9il.net/


    <http://www.ab9il.net/wlan-projects/wifi6.html>
    Nice but not enough info to actually build one. There's no detail on
    the driven element. Some general comments:

    1. The center of the Wi-fi band is 2442 MHz, not 2450 Mhz
    2. Round the ends of the elements. Don't square them off. The cut
    length should be to about 2/3 the radiused end. See Antennex yagis
    for what I'm talking about. It increases the usable bandwidth
    dramatically with no loss in gain. The wire guage you're using will
    result in a rather narrow bandwidth. I prefer 1/4" copper water pipe.
    3. When I click on the right hand antenna pattern image, I get 404
    not found.
    4. The directivity pattern looks really odd (if not wrong). It
    should look something like this:
    <http://www.hyperlinktech.com/multimedia/datasheets/DS_HG2415Y.PDF>
    Note that for 14.5dBi gain, the commercial antenna is about 462 mm.
    Yours is 419 mm long. Close enough.
    5. What is the boom made from? It looks like wood. Hopefully it's
    not conductive or all you calcs are wrong. With a conductive boom,
    the element length is measured to go around the outside of the boom.
    Wood also has a bad habit of absorbing moisture. I watched a 440MHz
    yagi that I build from a 2x2 fir boom slowly change vSWR pattern over
    several months as the wood absorbed and released moisture. I don't
    expect much of a problem with your size boom, but it is something that
    you should watch for.
    6. Oops. I didn't see the "next step" at the bottom of the page. May
    I suggest you make it an obvious button that's duplicated at the top
    of the page. The 2nd page details the construction, but doesn't show
    how the pigtail is attached, whether a balun is used, and whether any
    matching is required for what is normally a 200 ohm folded dipole.
    7. I can feed the design into 4NEC2 and see what it looks like, but
    don't have the time. (sorry).
    8. Have you done any measurements? Even a Netstumbler comparison
    with a known reference antenna is useful.
    9. You might wanna post it to rec.radio.amateur.antenna for
    additional comments.

    Good luck.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

  3. #3
    miso@sushi.com
    Guest

    Re: 15 Element Wi-Fi Yagi

    On Oct 24, 11:21*am, Jeff Liebermann <je...@cruzio.com> wrote:
    > On Fri, 24 Oct 2008 08:21:57 -0700 (PDT), ab9il.worldw...@gmail.com
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Okay guys and gals, it's done. *After lots of e-mails asking about a
    > >good Wi-Fi antenna that is simple to build and still beats the
    > >cantennas and wok-tops: *http:www.ab9il.net/wlan-projects/
    > >wifi6.html . *Gain is around 15 dBi, and it is made of wood, wire, and
    > >a pigtail.

    >
    > >Enjoy!

    >
    > >Phil
    > >http://www.ab9il.net/

    >
    > <http://www.ab9il.net/wlan-projects/wifi6.html>
    > Nice but not enough info to actually build one. *There's no detail on
    > the driven element. *Some general comments:
    >
    > 1. *The center of the Wi-fi band is 2442 MHz, not 2450 Mhz
    > 2. *Round the ends of the elements. *Don't square them off. *The cut
    > length should be to about 2/3 the radiused end. *See Antennex yagis
    > for what I'm talking about. *It increases the usable bandwidth
    > dramatically with no loss in gain. *The wire guage you're using will
    > result in a rather narrow bandwidth. *I prefer 1/4" copper water pipe.
    > 3. *When I click on the right hand antenna pattern image, I get 404
    > not found.
    > 4. *The directivity pattern looks really odd (if not wrong). *It
    > should look something like this:
    > <http://www.hyperlinktech.com/multimedia/datasheets/DS_HG2415Y.PDF>
    > Note that for 14.5dBi gain, the commercial antenna is about 462 mm.
    > Yours is 419 mm long. *Close enough.
    > 5. *What is the boom made from? *It looks like wood. *Hopefully it's
    > not conductive or all you calcs are wrong. *With a conductive boom,
    > the element length is measured to go around the outside of the boom.
    > Wood also has a bad habit of absorbing moisture. *I watched a 440MHz
    > yagi that I build from a 2x2 fir boom slowly change vSWR pattern over
    > several months as the wood absorbed and released moisture. *I don't
    > expect much of a problem with your size boom, but it is something that
    > you should watch for.
    > 6. *Oops. *I didn't see the "next step" at the bottom of the page. May
    > I suggest you make it an obvious button that's duplicated at the top
    > of the page. *The 2nd page details the construction, but doesn't show
    > how the pigtail is attached, whether a balun is used, and whether any
    > matching is required for what is normally a 200 ohm folded dipole.
    > 7. *I can feed the design into 4NEC2 and see what it looks like, but
    > don't have the time. *(sorry).
    > 8. *Have you done any measurements? *Even a Netstumbler comparison
    > with a known reference antenna is useful. *
    > 9. *You might wanna post it to rec.radio.amateur.antenna for
    > additional comments.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann * * je...@cruzio.com
    > 150 Felker St #D * *http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060http://802.11junk.com
    > Skype: JeffLiebermann * * AE6KS * *831-336-2558


    At wifi frequencies, the dimensions are within the range of those
    "Internet" PCB manufacturers. Is a PCB trace too thin to make an
    antenna?

  4. #4
    Jeff Liebermann
    Guest

    Re: 15 Element Wi-Fi Yagi

    On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 19:46:21 -0700 (PDT), miso@sushi.com wrote:

    >At wifi frequencies, the dimensions are within the range of those
    >"Internet" PCB manufacturers.


    Well, yeah. I think you mean the tolerances, not dimensions.

    >Is a PCB trace too thin to make an
    >antenna?


    What PCB trace? Are you thinking of building a PCB driven element or
    balun? It can easily be done. For example, here's a 900MHz log
    periodic PCB antenna:
    <http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/antennas/Sinclair%20SRL441-2P/index.html>
    Note that the PCB material is polysulfone, not G10/FR4.

    Much cheaper are those made by Ramsey for various bands:
    <http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/downloads/catalog/catalog_antenna.pdf>
    <http://k0swi.microlnk.com/REVIEW/ANTENNAS/RAMSEY%20LOGI%20ANTENNAS.htm>
    These are G10/FR4.

    The width of the trace acts exactly the same way as the diameter of a
    rod element in a traditional yagi antenna. The fatter the element,
    the greater the bandwidth. All a too narrow a trace does is narrow up
    the usable bandwidth.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

  5. #5
    Knight
    Guest

    Re: 15 Element Wi-Fi Yagi

    Phil,
    Do you have a photo of the coax connection to the Yagi?
    Thanks buddy!

    Pete



    On Oct 24, 10:21*am, ab9il.worldw...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Okay guys and gals, it's done. *After lots of e-mails asking about a
    > good Wi-Fi antenna that is simple to build and still beats the
    > cantennas and wok-tops: *http:www.ab9il.net/wlan-projects/
    > wifi6.html . *Gain is around 15 dBi, and it is made of wood, wire, and
    > a pigtail.
    >
    > Enjoy!
    >
    > Philhttp://www.ab9il.net/



  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1
    Hi Pete,

    I'm glad to see people are actually building and using this antenna. It's as simple as measure, cut and drill, assemble, and use...It works like a champion!

    Connecting to the driven element is simple - just solder your coaxial shield to one side of the folded dipole, and solder the center to the other side, and the antenna is ready for operation. I'll add a close-up photo to to show that connection more clearly.

    Regards,
    Phil AB9IL

    http://www.ab9il.net

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1

    I built your antenna


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