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Thread: distance between cable socket and modem

  1. #1
    Nima Rezai
    Guest

    distance between cable socket and modem

    Hello,

    I want to install a cable modem but I dont want to have the modem in
    close proximity of my TV.
    So I guess I need a long coaxial cable to maximize the distance between
    the socket in my wall and the modem, to which I want to connect my
    router as an access point for 2-3 PCs.

    Will I have losses on bandwidth if I take a cable of 10m?
    I dont want to use any "bridge solution" such as WLAN due to its
    inherent instability.

    Best regards
    Nima

  2. #2
    The Kat
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 13:32:43 +0200, Nima Rezai <rezai_nima@yahoo.de> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I want to install a cable modem but I dont want to have the modem in
    >close proximity of my TV.
    >So I guess I need a long coaxial cable to maximize the distance between
    >the socket in my wall and the modem, to which I want to connect my
    >router as an access point for 2-3 PCs.
    >
    >Will I have losses on bandwidth if I take a cable of 10m?
    >I dont want to use any "bridge solution" such as WLAN due to its
    >inherent instability.


    10 meters of coax OR ethernet won't affect your speed at all.





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  3. #3
    Todd H.
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    Nima Rezai <rezai_nima@yahoo.de> writes:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I want to install a cable modem but I dont want to have the modem in
    > close proximity of my TV.
    > So I guess I need a long coaxial cable to maximize the distance
    > between the socket in my wall and the modem, to which I want to
    > connect my router as an access point for 2-3 PCs.
    >
    > Will I have losses on bandwidth if I take a cable of 10m?
    > I dont want to use any "bridge solution" such as WLAN due to its
    > inherent instability.


    In general, you're far better off making that run with ethernet cable
    verus co-ax. Leave the modem near the jack where teh installer tested
    and verified signal levels and cabled it with a cable they made from
    the proper grade of co-ax.

    From there, run any ole standard ethernet cable to wherever you'd like
    to place your router.

    You might get away with adding 10m of off the shelf cable to your
    modem drop, then again you might put yourself on the ragged edge of
    upstream gain, cause a lot of packet loss and generally make your life
    hell. Make the run in ethernet, and you're far less likely to have
    trouble.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  4. #4
    Todd H.
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    The Kat <news1@katxyzkave.net> writes:

    > On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 13:32:43 +0200, Nima Rezai <rezai_nima@yahoo.de> wrote:
    >
    >>Hello,
    >>
    >>I want to install a cable modem but I dont want to have the modem in
    >>close proximity of my TV.
    >>So I guess I need a long coaxial cable to maximize the distance between
    >>the socket in my wall and the modem, to which I want to connect my
    >>router as an access point for 2-3 PCs.
    >>
    >>Will I have losses on bandwidth if I take a cable of 10m?
    >>I dont want to use any "bridge solution" such as WLAN due to its
    >>inherent instability.

    >
    > 10 meters of coax OR ethernet won't affect your speed at all.


    10 meters of ethernet isn't going to trouble anyone, it's true in
    almost all cases.

    However, I'm afraid this is simply not true for all cases with co-ax.

    You can degrade the cable modem upstream path in a hurry with the
    wrong grade of cable, poor connectors or both in addition to the loss
    on 30 additional feet of marginal co-ax cable. Or in my case given
    the length of my outdoor drop, another 30 feet would make things
    simply not work here.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  5. #5
    Henry
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    Todd H. <comphelp@toddh.net> wrote:

    > Nima Rezai <rezai_nima@yahoo.de> writes:
    >
    > > I want to install a cable modem but I dont want to have the modem in
    > > close proximity of my TV.
    > > So I guess I need a long coaxial cable to maximize the distance
    > > between the socket in my wall and the modem, to which I want to
    > > connect my router as an access point for 2-3 PCs.
    > >
    > > Will I have losses on bandwidth if I take a cable of 10m?
    > > I dont want to use any "bridge solution" such as WLAN due to its
    > > inherent instability.

    >
    > In general, you're far better off making that run with ethernet cable
    > verus co-ax. Leave the modem near the jack where teh installer tested
    > and verified signal levels and cabled it with a cable they made from
    > the proper grade of co-ax.
    >
    > From there, run any ole standard ethernet cable to wherever you'd like
    > to place your router.
    >
    > You might get away with adding 10m of off the shelf cable to your
    > modem drop, then again you might put yourself on the ragged edge of
    > upstream gain, cause a lot of packet loss and generally make your life
    > hell. Make the run in ethernet, and you're far less likely to have
    > trouble.



    Anyone _can_ have a bad experience, of course, but I think you're being
    unduly pessimistic. The first problem with your suggestion of putting
    the cablemodem at the wall-socket is that whilst seated at the computer
    you then can't see the indicator lights -- which are, after all, put on
    the device for a reason. In a perfect world, the cablemodem wouldn't
    have those lights but ...

    I live on the fourth floor of a seven-storey building. The cable service
    comes from under the street into the basement and is then distributed
    throughout the building. In my living room is the jack -- 'where the
    installer tested and verified signal levels' ??? HA! You must be joking.

    In any event, I have a five-metre cable running from the jack to the
    first television (and the first splitter), then another five-metre coax
    to the second television (and splitter) and finally a third five-metre
    coax to the cablemodem, on the shelf above my primary computer and next
    to the router.

    Everything works fine! Once in a rare while the 'net goes down, but
    that's when the ISP has issues at the head end. And when that occurs,
    the lights on the cablemodem tell me that it's lost sync, without me
    having to scratch my head, get up and go out to the wall-socket to
    wonder what's going on.

    To the OP: with a decent quality cable, a run of 10 metre coax will in
    all likelihood pose no problem at all. There will (probably*) be no
    'loss of bandwidth'.

    ( * I obviously can't make you any promises. As I said at the beginning,
    there is always a small chance -- I'd put it at 1-2% -- that it won't
    work the way you want, for whatever reason. But, hey, that's a
    reasonable level of 'risk', eh? And if you get unlucky, the solution is
    simple enough: _then_ you put the cablemodem at the wall-socket and run
    a 10-metre Cat.6 ethernet cable to your router.)

    cheers,

    Henry

  6. #6
    Bill M.
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 19:56:53 +0300, henry999@eircom.net (Henry) wrote:

    >I live on the fourth floor of a seven-storey building. The cable service
    >comes from under the street into the basement and is then distributed
    >throughout the building. In my living room is the jack -- 'where the
    >installer tested and verified signal levels' ??? HA! You must be joking.
    >
    >In any event, I have a five-metre cable running from the jack to the
    >first television (and the first splitter), then another five-metre coax
    >to the second television (and splitter) and finally a third five-metre
    >coax to the cablemodem, on the shelf above my primary computer and next
    >to the router.


    You've got one of the worst installations I've heard of in quite
    awhile. I'm not surprised that your service goes down occasionally. If
    your modem allows it, log in with a web browser and check your signal
    levels. I wonder if they are at the ragged edge because of all those
    splitters.

    >Everything works fine! Once in a rare while the 'net goes down, but
    >that's when the ISP has issues at the head end. And when that occurs,
    >the lights on the cablemodem tell me that it's lost sync, without me
    >having to scratch my head, get up and go out to the wall-socket to
    >wonder what's going on.


    Try the web browser approach. You might find it more convenient.

    --
    Bill

  7. #7
    Todd H.
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    henry999@eircom.net (Henry) writes:

    > Anyone _can_ have a bad experience, of course, but I think you're being
    > unduly pessimistic. The first problem with your suggestion of putting
    > the cablemodem at the wall-socket is that whilst seated at the computer
    > you then can't see the indicator lights -- which are, after all, put on
    > the device for a reason. In a perfect world, the cablemodem wouldn't
    > have those lights but ...
    >
    > I live on the fourth floor of a seven-storey building. The cable service
    > comes from under the street into the basement and is then distributed
    > throughout the building. In my living room is the jack -- 'where the
    > installer tested and verified signal levels' ??? HA! You must be
    > joking.


    Not joking. I have 4 installs of experience since starting with cable
    modem in 98. All 4 times, the installer verified signal/noise
    downstream signal strength and upstream required gain at the inside
    jack where the modem was to be installed. These numbers can vary by
    3-9 dB just inside one home, and bad cable or connectors can create
    issues that aren't directly measurable as well.

    And half of those, I've been lucky enough to have issues with drop
    length and signal quality with two separate cable modem providers,
    company owned new modems in two of 4 separate single-family residences
    in suburban Chicagoland.

    No doubt indicator lights are a nice to have, and if you can get your
    modem near your computer, great. If you want to run cable once and be
    confident it's quite unlikely to change things, you run ethernet. If
    the install happens to be on the edge of a good signal one tends to
    care a lot more about 15% packet loss than seeing winky blinks. If
    the net goes down, a walk over to the TV is generally what you have to
    do anyway to compare modem carrier to what if anything has changed
    with the catv signal. :-)

    > In any event, I have a five-metre cable running from the jack to the
    > first television (and the first splitter), then another five-metre
    > coax to the second television (and splitter) and finally a third
    > five-metre coax to the cablemodem, on the shelf above my primary
    > computer and next to the router.
    >
    > Everything works fine!


    Count yourself rather lucky that you put your signal through 2
    conventional (non-directional coupler) splitters with things still
    working without a hitch. You must have excellent signal in your
    building.

    My point is simply that adding 30 feet of unspecified quality co-ax
    cable with possibly consumer-installed terminators to a cable modem
    run is not nearly as foolproof as plugging in a 30 foot ethernet
    cable.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  8. #8
    Henry
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    Bill M. <wbillups@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > You've got one of the worst installations I've heard of in quite
    > awhile. I'm not surprised that your service goes down occasionally.



    You must have missed the part where I said everything is fine! When the
    service goes down, two or three times a year, it is due to external
    factors, not my cabling.

    cheers,

    Henry

  9. #9
    Henry
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    Todd H. <comphelp@toddh.net> wrote:

    > Not joking. I have 4 installs of experience since starting with cable
    > modem in 98. All 4 times, the installer verified signal/noise
    > downstream signal strength and upstream required gain at the inside
    > jack where the modem was to be installed.


    Interesting. Here you go to the ISP's office and they give you the
    cablemodem, after scanning the MAC address. By the time you get home
    they have programmed their system to recognise that device at your
    residence so when you connect everything together and turn it on, it
    syncs up and away you go. It just works. For those people who can't hook
    it up themselves, they will send a tech but it costs an arm and a leg.

    Reminds me of 10 years ago when I had ISDN. The newsgroups were full of
    guys lamenting the grief they were having getting their SPIDs
    configured, etc. Here, I never heard of anyone having trouble with that.

    cheers,

    Henry

  10. #10
    Bill M.
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 22:42:13 +0300, henry999@eircom.net (Henry) wrote:

    >Bill M. <wbillups@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> You've got one of the worst installations I've heard of in quite
    >> awhile. I'm not surprised that your service goes down occasionally.

    >
    >
    >You must have missed the part where I said everything is fine! When the
    >service goes down, two or three times a year, it is due to external
    >factors, not my cabling.


    Nah, I didn't miss it. It was in the same paragraph where you said
    your service goes down periodically. You blamed it on the head end or
    cabling, but it's more likely that the problem is in your house. It
    doesn't seem likely that the cable company expected you to run your
    Internet signal through 3 splitters.

    Check your signal levels and see where they fall in the acceptable
    range. Check them again (or at least check the modem log) when the
    service is out so you have a basis for comparison. On the other hand,
    if losing sync now and then is "fine", then carry on.

    --
    Bill

  11. #11
    Bill M.
    Guest

    Re: distance between cable socket and modem

    On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 23:57:49 +0300, henry999@eircom.net (Henry) wrote:

    >Todd H. <comphelp@toddh.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Not joking. I have 4 installs of experience since starting with cable
    >> modem in 98. All 4 times, the installer verified signal/noise
    >> downstream signal strength and upstream required gain at the inside
    >> jack where the modem was to be installed.

    >
    >Interesting. Here you go to the ISP's office and they give you the
    >cablemodem, after scanning the MAC address. By the time you get home
    >they have programmed their system to recognise that device at your
    >residence so when you connect everything together and turn it on, it
    >syncs up and away you go. It just works. For those people who can't hook
    >it up themselves, they will send a tech but it costs an arm and a leg.


    I'm not trying to be mean or rude, but it sounds like you may have
    done a self install. That would explain the 3 splitters in series. I'm
    glad it works as well as it does.

    --
    Bill

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