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Thread: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

  1. #21
    Nomen Nescio
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    nemo_outis wrote:

    > nospamatall <nospamatall@iol.ie> wrote in news:foe450$6bv$1@aioe.org:
    >
    > > Casper wrote:
    > >>> No, it's not. With a two partition setup and both encrypted you can
    > >>> still see partition information booting from a LiveCD
    > >>>
    > >>> It's NOT whole disk encryption. It was never advertised as such.
    > >>
    > >> Thank you for the info, I am glad you understand the difference
    > >> between asking for a password on boot up and having the whole thing
    > >> encrypted, too many people confuse these terms.
    > >>
    > >>

    > > I can see that there is a difference, but why would it be important?
    > > If the entire disk is encrypted, how could you do anything with it?
    > >
    > > Andy

    >
    >
    > The entire disk IS encrypted, with the exception of the boot stub on
    > track 0.


    Tell you what, why don't you go right ahead and shrink your main
    bootable partition on your first hard drive and create another
    partition on that drive (if you don't have one there already) and then
    use Truecrypt to encrypt that entire drive as a single device so the
    entire disk IS encrypted. Let us know how that works out for you.

    Hope you have backups. ;)

    > All full HD OTFE encryption schemes need a small amount of unencrypted
    > code to initialize themselves, etc. and this is normally stored on track
    > 0, with the BIOS doing handoff to the first sector on that track (the
    > MBR) during bootup from the HD (assuming it has the system partition).
    >
    > Usually only the first sector on that (notionally 63-sector) track is
    > non-empty (although there are exceptions) so usually there is no problem
    > with the encryption software arrogating the whole track to itself. Most
    > do. (Their arrogation of track 0 can cause problems with some
    > multi-loaders, etc. which also wish to grab track 0)
    >
    > The conventional partition table is also normally stored as part of the
    > first sector of track zero (there are some subtle differences for newer
    > schemes such as GPT/GUID partitions). While this table could be
    > encrypted by full HD OTFE software it is, IMNSHO, bad practice to do so.


    Bah! Dozens of things move/alter the partition table Nemo, for all
    sorts of reasons.

    > The reason is that other software (as might be used, for instance, by
    > someone who does not know that the disk is encrypted) often reads the
    > partition table to discern how the disk is used and even whether it is
    > trashed and available for (re-)formatting. An encryped partition table
    > is just begging for trouble from any use of such software.


    That sounds like a straw grab. And in some cases like someone stealing
    your 'puter it's actually a GOOD thing. It's your encryption software
    keeping your data out of the hands of a thief in a real permanent way.

    If you're using WD encryption and ignore some utility run from a boot
    floppy or whatever telling you that it doesn't recognize your drive and
    something bad happens I'd call that PEBKAC. If someone else does it you
    either have a lack of communication, or a lack of physical security and
    the software is covering your ass. :)

    >
    > The only information leaked by using an unencrypted (conventional)
    > partition table is the start, end, size, type/signature, and "active"
    > bit/(drive #) of the (up to) 4 partitions . This is not a serious
    > leakage of information and leaving the partition table in plaintext
    > (plaintext for a partition table, that is) minimizes the risks noted
    > above.


    You may not see it as a serious threat, but others are free to disagree
    with that opinion. Myself included. In the context of these groups and
    recent discussions we've been having about things like RIPA and forced
    divulging of passwords, knowing that you need two or more passwords to
    get at everything rather than one is a DISTINCT advantage for anyone
    bringing the weight of that law to bear against you.

    >
    > In short, ALL full HD OTFE encryption programs have an unencrypted stub
    > on the boot hard drive. Some of them may encrypt the partition table,
    > some may not - but the security risks in not encrypting are negligible
    > and it minimizes risks from other sources.


    Yeah, nobody's saying anything different. In fact nobody's even talking
    about that aspect of WD/OTFE encryption Nemo. Why are you? :)

    >
    > It is generally good practice to back up the entire first track (which
    > includes the MBR). In fact, most "emergency recovery disks" for full HD
    > OTFE programs do exactly this (and often a bit more as well).


    Doesn't Truecrypt have a built in mechanism for doing just that? I
    think if you read the docs you see something about rescue CD's. ;)

    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > PS There will be all sorts of wailing and moaning over this post from
    > various quibblers, cavillers, and whiners - have many large grains of
    > salt handy to deal with their responses.


    If you knew you were wrong, then why did you make the post?


  2. #22
    Nomen Nescio
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Casper wrote:

    > > No, it's not. With a two partition setup and both encrypted you can
    > > still see partition information booting from a LiveCD
    > >
    > > It's NOT whole disk encryption. It was never advertised as such.

    >
    > Thank you for the info, I am glad you understand the difference between
    > asking for a password on boot up and having the whole thing encrypted,
    > too many people confuse these terms.


    Actually, in this case the two things are the same if you're talking
    about being able to access your boot partition. That's what the
    pre-boot authentication does... set up OTFE access for that drive. It
    absolutely *is* encrypted, and looks like random data to anyone with a
    LiveCD or whatever.


  3. #23
    nemo_outis
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    George Orwell <nobody@mixmaster.it> wrote in
    news:d7ac7fb60c39b076fbe85e54bf4ba496@mixmaster.it:

    Ah, the first of the whiners and cavillers has arrived. ...with a
    farrago of nonsense. ...just as I predicted.


    > nemo_outis wrote:
    >
    >> The entire disk IS encrypted, with the exception of the boot stub
    >> on track 0.

    >
    > No, it's not. If you have two partitions and encrypt only the
    > "system" partition the other isn't touched.


    Are you usually this thick? Yes, even though you have a whole-disk
    encryption program you can choose not to encrypt some partitions - or any
    of them for that matter. However, choosing not to use the program's
    capability for whole-disk encryption doesn't make it one whit less a
    whole-disk encryption program.

    As for a boot drive's partition table, some full HD OTFE programs may
    encrypt it, while others may not - just as I said. For instance,
    Bestcrypt Volume Encryption (one of the better commercial full-HD OTFE
    programs) does NOT encrypt the partiton table on a fully encrypted hard
    drive - I have just confirmed this with a number of partition managers
    (using Hiren v9.3).

    Why? Because encrypted partition tables are just asking for trouble from
    some program that doesn't recognize that the disk is not trashed (i.e.,
    one that misinterprets an encrypted partition table as a corrupted one).

    Just as I said.

    The benefit from encrypting the partition table? None!

    It does not hide the fact that you are using encryption - that's already
    instantly discernible by the presence of the encryption programs's
    unencrypted executable stub code on track 0.

    As for an unencrypted partition table disclosing info, that trivial info
    is useless for decrypting the contents of the partitions or even
    inferring the nature of what is contained in them.

    As for Truecrypt supposedly not being a whole-disk encryption program,
    that's just plain wrong. With the release of Version 5 Truecrypt is now
    a full-fledged whole-disk encryption program, capable of encrypting any
    or all of the partitions on any of the hard drives in a system, including
    the boot/system one. Of course, Truecrypt does have an unencrypted stub
    on track zero - as do ALL other whole-disk OTFE encryption programs.

    Just as I said.

    ....additional rambling nonsense mercifully snipped...

    Regards,

  4. #24
    nemo_outis
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Nomen Nescio <nobody@dizum.com> wrote in
    news:8bfad53b8d4b69cd8d27311d874867f6@dizum.com:

    > nemo_outis wrote:
    >> The entire disk IS encrypted, with the exception of the boot stub on
    >> track 0.


    > Tell you what, why don't you go right ahead and shrink your main
    > bootable partition on your first hard drive and create another
    > partition on that drive (if you don't have one there already) and then
    > use Truecrypt to encrypt that entire drive as a single device so the
    > entire disk IS encrypted. Let us know how that works out for you.
    >
    > Hope you have backups. ;)


    You really are a whining caviller. However, lest others be misled, I will
    explain why I am 100% correct.

    You see, the space on a HD, as conventionally set up, consists entirely of
    the following: the boot track and one or more partitions. (This excludes
    the rare cases where there is unallocated unpartitioned space on the drive,
    and arcana such as the HPA and manufacturer's reserved space).

    So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5 now
    allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have encrypted
    the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the small
    unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other whole-disk HD
    OTFE encryption programs.

    Just as I said.

    Regards,

  5. #25
    Sebastian G.
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    George Orwell wrote:


    >> However, I found a privilege escalation vulnerability from version 4.3a
    >> being carried over, so I heavily recommend to avoid using TrueCrypt until
    >> it's fixed.

    >
    > Actually, on Linux I think this is fixed. You have to authenticate as
    > the "owner" of a volume before giving any system passwords necessary
    > for mounting that volume. It use to be the other way around.



    Your speculation is going into the wrong direction. The undisclosed
    privilege escalation I'm talking about requires only to run a specially
    crafted program with non-root privileges by a logged-on user (which might
    potentially be compromised). The result is that the program gains root
    privileges.

    Indeed, the attack works quite well if the malicious program uses
    TrueCrypt's official code to create a fresh file container volume without
    caring for its content.

  6. #26
    Sebastian G.
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    nemo_outis wrote:


    > You see, the space on a HD, as conventionally set up, consists entirely of
    > the following: the boot track and one or more partitions. (This excludes
    > the rare cases where there is unallocated unpartitioned space on the drive,
    > and arcana such as the HPA and manufacturer's reserved space).
    >
    > So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5 now
    > allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have encrypted
    > the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the small
    > unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other whole-disk HD
    > OTFE encryption programs.



    If you're not using the pre-boot stuff, then TrueCrypt can encrypt the
    entire volume including the MBR with its partition table.

  7. #27
    nemo_outis
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    "Sebastian G." <seppi@seppig.de> wrote in
    news:610sj2F1qodjmU2@mid.dfncis.de:

    > nemo_outis wrote:
    >
    >
    >> You see, the space on a HD, as conventionally set up, consists
    >> entirely of the following: the boot track and one or more partitions.
    >> (This excludes the rare cases where there is unallocated
    >> unpartitioned space on the drive, and arcana such as the HPA and
    >> manufacturer's reserved space).
    >>
    >> So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5
    >> now allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have
    >> encrypted the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the
    >> small unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other
    >> whole-disk HD OTFE encryption programs.

    >
    >
    > If you're not using the pre-boot stuff, then TrueCrypt can encrypt the
    > entire volume including the MBR with its partition table.


    There must - necessarily! - be a small amount of unencrypted code on the
    boot/system volume. This is invariably located on track 0.

    Regards,




  8. #28
    Sebastian G.
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    nemo_outis wrote:


    >>> So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5
    >>> now allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have
    >>> encrypted the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the
    >>> small unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other
    >>> whole-disk HD OTFE encryption programs.

    >>
    >> If you're not using the pre-boot stuff, then TrueCrypt can encrypt the


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    >> entire volume including the MBR with its partition table.

    >
    > There must - necessarily! - be a small amount of unencrypted code on the
    > boot/system volume. This is invariably located on track 0.



    I underlined you something. Full disk encryption doesn't necessarily imply
    that the encrypted volume is a boot/system volume.

  9. #29
    nemo_outis
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    "Sebastian G." <seppi@seppig.de> wrote in
    news:610vsoF1rnd8cU1@mid.dfncis.de:


    > I underlined you something. Full disk encryption doesn't necessarily
    > imply that the encrypted volume is a boot/system volume.



    This is true albeit somewhat banal. Any Windows OTFE program capable of
    encrypting partitions has long been able to encrypt all the partitions on
    all drives - with the sole exception of the boot partition on the system
    drive. That was the last hurdle for Truecrypt, one which v5 has now
    cleared.

    Truecrypt (for v5 as for previous versions) represents in its documentation
    that it does NOT change in any way (much less encrypt) the partition table
    on a drive on which Truecrypt partitions reside (i.e., does not encrypt it
    and has no special Truecrypt signature byte). I heven't checked whether
    this is indeed so in all cases.

    Regards,

  10. #30
    Sebastian G.
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    nemo_outis wrote:


    > Truecrypt (for v5 as for previous versions) represents in its documentation
    > that it does NOT change in any way (much less encrypt) the partition table
    > on a drive on which Truecrypt partitions reside (i.e., does not encrypt it
    > and has no special Truecrypt signature byte). I heven't checked whether
    > this is indeed so in all cases.



    Maybe this statement was confusing: TrueCrypt can encrypt entire drives and
    mount it as a raw volume. Within this volume, you can create a partition
    table and associated partitions, which may or may not be additionally
    encrypted, or you may put there whatever you want.

    An attacker seeing the raw encrypted volume will only perceive random
    garbage at the place where the partition table would reside, and indeed one
    must be very careful to not run any partitioning tools with admin privileges
    while the raw volume is not mounted.

  11. #31
    Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Sebastian G. wrote:

    > nemo_outis wrote:
    >
    >
    > > You see, the space on a HD, as conventionally set up, consists entirely of
    > > the following: the boot track and one or more partitions. (This excludes
    > > the rare cases where there is unallocated unpartitioned space on the drive,
    > > and arcana such as the HPA and manufacturer's reserved space).
    > >
    > > So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5 now
    > > allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have encrypted
    > > the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the small
    > > unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other whole-disk HD
    > > OTFE encryption programs.

    >
    >
    > If you're not using the pre-boot stuff, then TrueCrypt can encrypt the
    > entire volume including the MBR with its partition table.


    It "can", but that's a destructive process and there's absolutely no
    way to bootstrap any operating system that you might install after the
    fact.

    You guys aren't thinking this through.


  12. #32
    nospamatall
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Anonymous wrote:
    > nospamatall wrote:
    >
    >> Casper wrote:
    >>>> No, it's not. With a two partition setup and both encrypted
    >>>> you can still see partition information booting from a LiveCD
    >>>>
    >>>> It's NOT whole disk encryption. It was never advertised as
    >>>> such.
    >>> Thank you for the info, I am glad you understand the difference
    >>> between asking for a password on boot up and having the whole
    >>> thing encrypted, too many people confuse these terms.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I can see that there is a difference, but why would it be
    >> important? If the entire disk is encrypted, how could you do
    >> anything with it?

    >
    > We were just discussing the issue of plausible deniability, and
    > determining if individual encrypted devices/volumes existed at all.
    > If you need to hide the fact that certain volumes exist then it
    > becomes an issue.


    I would have thought that this is not an issue with TrueCrypt, because
    the hidden partition is within the free space of another encrypted
    partition and thus doesn't show up anywhere else?

  13. #33
    Phil Carmody
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer <anonymous@remailer.cyberiade.it> writes:
    > Sebastian G. wrote:
    >
    > > nemo_outis wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > > You see, the space on a HD, as conventionally set up, consists entirely of
    > > > the following: the boot track and one or more partitions. (This excludes
    > > > the rare cases where there is unallocated unpartitioned space on the drive,
    > > > and arcana such as the HPA and manufacturer's reserved space).
    > > >
    > > > So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5 now
    > > > allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have encrypted
    > > > the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the small
    > > > unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other whole-disk HD
    > > > OTFE encryption programs.

    > >
    > >
    > > If you're not using the pre-boot stuff, then TrueCrypt can encrypt the
    > > entire volume including the MBR with its partition table.

    >
    > It "can", but that's a destructive process and there's absolutely no
    > way to bootstrap any operating system that you might install after the
    > fact.
    >
    > You guys aren't thinking this through.


    Au contraire. Sebastian's thought this through in its
    entirety, it's just that you're all taking a long time
    to catch up.

    Your "that's a destructive process" is either meaningless
    or wrong. Your "there's absolutely no way to bootstrap any
    operating system" is completely false. Boot of another
    medium. Trivial.

    _Any_ container for an encrypted file system will break
    the contained file system if tampered with. That applies
    exactly equally to an entire disk as it does to a single
    file sitting within an arbitrary other file system.

    Please try to keep up.

    Phil
    --
    Dear aunt, let's set so double the killer delete select all.
    -- Microsoft voice recognition live demonstration

  14. #34
    Paul Rubin
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer <anonymous@remailer.cyberiade.it> writes:
    > It "can", but that's a destructive process and there's absolutely no
    > way to bootstrap any operating system that you might install after the
    > fact.
    >
    > You guys aren't thinking this through.


    I don't know anything about truecrypt and haven't been following this
    discussion, but I've often wanted to encrypt my laptop's internal hard
    drive like that. The only way to boot would be from another drive,
    and I'd use a usb pen drive for that purpose.

  15. #35
    nospamatall
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Casper wrote:
    >> I can see that there is a difference, but why would it be important? If
    >> the entire disk is encrypted, how could you do anything with it?
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Then if you see a difference, can you explain what the difference is?
    > That would answer your question at the same time.
    >
    >

    The difference is that the partition info and some other stuff may not
    be encrypted. This doesn't answer my question though. Do any data leak
    into the non-user partitions? I had heard that some shyster companies
    use these partitions for their nefarious 'DRM' so I spose it is
    possible, but not if Truecrypt is in control of where all the data are
    going?

    Something has to be unencrypted somewhere, otherwise the disk will be
    unusable. Some programs might overcome this by taking care of that
    business themselves, but surely that is just moving the same risk elsewhere?

    Andy

  16. #36
    Sebastian G.
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer wrote:

    > Sebastian G. wrote:
    >
    >> nemo_outis wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> You see, the space on a HD, as conventionally set up, consists entirely of
    >>> the following: the boot track and one or more partitions. (This excludes
    >>> the rare cases where there is unallocated unpartitioned space on the drive,
    >>> and arcana such as the HPA and manufacturer's reserved space).
    >>>
    >>> So, if you encrypt all partitions on such a drive (as Truecrypt v5 now
    >>> allows you to do, even if it is the boot/system drive) you have encrypted
    >>> the **whole drive** - with the exception, of course, of the small
    >>> unencrypted bootstub info on track 0 - just as with ALL other whole-disk HD
    >>> OTFE encryption programs.

    >>
    >> If you're not using the pre-boot stuff, then TrueCrypt can encrypt the
    >> entire volume including the MBR with its partition table.

    >
    > It "can", but that's a destructive process and there's absolutely no
    > way to bootstrap any operating system that you might install after the
    > fact.
    >
    > You guys aren't thinking this through.



    Maybe you're just stupid. Why do you narrow your views to one drive? You can
    have two or more. One contains the operating system, does the pre-boot stuff
    and has an identifyable partition table. The second drive is meant to store
    data, and is fully encrypted, including the partition table.

  17. #37
    Ari
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    On 7 Feb 2008 16:00:31 +0100, Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer wrote:

    > Ari wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 07 Feb 2008 00:53:41 +0100, Sebastian G. wrote:
    >>
    >>> However, I found a privilege escalation vulnerability from version 4.3a
    >>> being carried over, so I heavily recommend to avoid using TrueCrypt until
    >>> it's fixed.

    >>
    >> Not to look a gift horse but why have they not fixed this?

    >
    > In a similar vein, the Linux version sucks. ;)
    >
    > OS encryption (it's not wholedisk) isn't even implemented. That's not a
    > huge problem because Linux has native counterparts, but it would have
    > been nice.
    >
    > There's also a cute new GUI, but you can't get around it as far as I can
    > tell. So if you're running Truecrypt on a remote machine via ssh or
    > what not, you'd better have GTK installed and X forwarding enabled or
    > you're screwed until you downgrade. Reminds me of that damned GnuPG2
    > pinentry crap. <grrrrrr>
    >
    > They also changed the sequence of passwords, at least on my Debian box
    > (the only place I've tried it so far). Threw me off the first time. I
    > thought my volumes were no longer compatible. ;)


    Hell, let's hope this is one step back which proceeds several forward. I
    admire those guys, I hope they haven't fallen over a cliff.
    --
    An Explanation Of The Need To Be "Anonymous"
    http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2004/03/19

  18. #38
    George Orwell
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    nemo_outis wrote:

    > Are you usually this thick? Yes, even though you have a whole-disk
    > encryption program you can choose not to encrypt some partitions - or any
    > of them for that matter. However, choosing not to use the program's
    > capability for whole-disk encryption doesn't make it one whit less a
    > whole-disk encryption program.
    >
    > As for a boot drive's partition table, some full HD OTFE programs may
    > encrypt it, while others may not - just as I said. For instance,
    > Bestcrypt Volume Encryption (one of the better commercial full-HD OTFE
    > programs) does NOT encrypt the partiton table on a fully encrypted hard
    > drive - I have just confirmed this with a number of partition managers
    > (using Hiren v9.3).


    Talk about thick... you don't even have the slightest clue what whole
    disk encryption really is. Got some more bad news for you sonny.
    Bestcrypt ain't on that list. That's right, it's not whole disk either.

    *snicker*

    You've been making a supreme fool of yourself all this time, puffing
    your chest and calling other people stupid in your usual self
    aggrandizing way, so just to rub your nose in it here's the current
    contenders as of 11/09/2007.

    http://www.full-disc-encryption.com/...ncryption.html

    Read'm and weep, bitch. Maybe some day you'll learn to not be
    such an arrogant jackass. :)


    Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
    non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
    reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
    di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
    Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
    https://www.mixmaster.it


  19. #39
    nemo_outis
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    George Orwell <nobody@mixmaster.it> wrote in
    news:a6b52b3f53d8d9e5e5666d21fd185ed6@mixmaster.it:

    > Talk about thick... you don't even have the slightest clue what whole
    > disk encryption really is. Got some more bad news for you sonny.
    > Bestcrypt ain't on that list. That's right, it's not whole disk
    > either.


    Another bit of stupidity from you, you mouthbreathing twit.

    Bestcrypt Volume Encryption for Windows is among the most advanced full-HD
    OTFE encryption systems. Not only can it encrypt all HD partitions on all
    HDs (including the boot/system one) it supports complete encyption of
    spanned, mirrored, and striped volumes, as well as RAID 5 volumes. It also
    supports physical tokens in addition to a password/passphrase for
    additional security.

    http://www.jetico.com/bcve.htm

    Now do be a good little moron and **** off.

    Regards,

  20. #40
    nemo_outis
    Guest

    Re: Truecrypt 5.0 Released (now with system partition encryption)

    George Orwell <nobody@mixmaster.it> wrote in
    news:a6b52b3f53d8d9e5e5666d21fd185ed6@mixmaster.it:

    > Talk about thick... you don't even have the slightest clue what whole
    > disk encryption really is. Got some more bad news for you sonny.
    > Bestcrypt ain't on that list. That's right, it's not whole disk
    > either.


    Another bit of stupidity from you, you mouthbreathing twit.

    Bestcrypt Volume Encryption for Windows is among the most advanced full-HD
    OTFE encryption systems. Not only can it encrypt all HD partitions on all
    HDs (including the boot/system one) it supports complete encryption of
    spanned, mirrored, and striped volumes, as well as RAID 5 volumes. It also
    supports physical tokens in addition to a password/passphrase for
    additional security.

    http://www.jetico.com/bcve.htm

    Now do be a good little moron and **** off.

    Regards,


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