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Thread: How much can one router port handle?

  1. #1
    steve
    Guest

    How much can one router port handle?

    I wanted to see if I can get better performace with the network I
    have.

    It is something that I inherited, I have always had the view of
    leaving alone basically.
    However in an effort to speed things up...

    I have a router connected to the interent, Wan port. I will call this
    my WAN/router. This Wan/router has about 4 ports on it. Then there
    is one cable running from there to a switch. From this switch feeds
    all the other lines in the building to other switches, routers,
    wireless routers in many cases computers.

    My question is, Would it be better to use up the extra ports on the
    first WAN/router to connect to other swtiches and routers inside the
    buidling, rather than as it is curently a single cable running from
    that WAN/router to a swtich and then to other devices.

    My thinking is that right now, all the signals come into the first WAN/
    router then out through a single port to the switch and other
    devices.

    I'm just thinking maybe spreading it out a little using up some of the
    other ports on the first WAN/router out to the network would help to
    share things a little.

    If you have other suggestions I'm happy to entertain them but I would
    like an answer to the question as at this moment this is what we have
    and this is for a school where money is tight. I dont anticipate
    making any changes in the near future.

    Regards

  2. #2
    ken
    Guest

    Re: How much can one router port handle?

    steve wrote:
    > I wanted to see if I can get better performace with the network I
    > have.
    >
    > It is something that I inherited, I have always had the view of
    > leaving alone basically.
    > However in an effort to speed things up...
    >
    > I have a router connected to the interent, Wan port. I will call this
    > my WAN/router. This Wan/router has about 4 ports on it. Then there
    > is one cable running from there to a switch. From this switch feeds
    > all the other lines in the building to other switches, routers,
    > wireless routers in many cases computers.
    >
    > My question is, Would it be better to use up the extra ports on the
    > first WAN/router to connect to other swtiches and routers inside the
    > buidling, rather than as it is curently a single cable running from
    > that WAN/router to a swtich and then to other devices.
    >
    > My thinking is that right now, all the signals come into the first WAN/
    > router then out through a single port to the switch and other
    > devices.
    >
    > I'm just thinking maybe spreading it out a little using up some of the
    > other ports on the first WAN/router out to the network would help to
    > share things a little.
    >
    > If you have other suggestions I'm happy to entertain them but I would
    > like an answer to the question as at this moment this is what we have
    > and this is for a school where money is tight. I dont anticipate
    > making any changes in the near future.
    >
    > Regards


    Since you didn't provide any model numbers for the router or switch or
    the internet connection speed you have this will have to be generic
    information.

    Internet connection speeds are slower than intranet speeds. For example,
    the best internet connection speeds I have heard of (and there certainly
    may be faster ones available) are 50 Mbps. Depending on the age of the
    router and switch, they are probably at least 10/100 Mbps. So, if the
    computers have at least 10/100 cards, the entire intranet (LAN) is
    capable of speeds greater than the internet (WAN) connection is able to
    handle. The internet connection is the slowest item and therefore any
    change on the LAN side will not have any internet performance improvement.

  3. #3
    steve
    Guest

    Re: How much can one router port handle?

    thanks for the answer. I didnt think that the switches and router
    models mattered since perhaps foolishly that 10/100 is asumed, I
    suppose nothing should be asumed. Your question on the type of service
    we have is well taken. And frankly I'm not sure. Of course what ever
    they tell us its probably about 1/2 of what we get. And then there is
    also the issue of upload speeds to download speeds which I think
    typically vary.

    I suppose there may be web sites that can test your speed, I duno.

    What you say makes sense. I suppose I wondered if there was some sort
    of advantage to agregate thoughput through several ports rather than
    putting it all through one.

    Regards

  4. #4
    Dale Wilcox
    Guest

    Re: How much can one router port handle?


    "steve" <stevesemple@lycos.com> wrote in message
    news:f7cddb0e-c9fd-4620-aa0b-462fe3368a5a@d4g2000prg.googlegroups.com...
    > thanks for the answer. I didnt think that the switches and router
    > models mattered since perhaps foolishly that 10/100 is asumed, I
    > suppose nothing should be asumed. Your question on the type of service
    > we have is well taken. And frankly I'm not sure. Of course what ever
    > they tell us its probably about 1/2 of what we get. And then there is
    > also the issue of upload speeds to download speeds which I think
    > typically vary.
    >
    > I suppose there may be web sites that can test your speed, I duno.
    >
    > What you say makes sense. I suppose I wondered if there was some sort
    > of advantage to agregate thoughput through several ports rather than
    > putting it all through one.
    >
    > Regards


    Google "speedtest" and try several different locations, Close to you and far
    away.

    Dale



  5. #5
    News Reader
    Guest

    Re: How much can one router port handle?

    The first thing you need to do is educate yourself about how a switch works.

    Switches build a table of the source MAC addresses observed, and
    associates them with the ports on which they were received. Once
    learned, the switch then forwards unicast packets out the associated
    port "only".

    e.g.: If a switch learns that the host with MAC address "X" is connected
    to port 2, there is no longer a need to send traffic destined to that
    host out all ports. It only sends the traffic out the port that it knows
    the host is connected to.


    With your current scenario (i.e.: one switch connect to the router's
    integrated switch) the only traffic seen on that router's interface is
    traffic destined to and from the Internet, as well as Layer 2 broadcasts
    and multicasts.

    That router interface is "not" seeing or processing LAN traffic between
    intranet hosts. Therefore, the load placed on the router's integrated
    switch is modest given the modest throughput of your Internet connection.


    If you change your topology to, lets say four intranet switches, each
    with a connection to a port on the router's integrated switch, the
    following is the result:

    When a host connected to intranet switch #1 wants to communicate with a
    host connected to intranet switch #4, that communication is now entering
    one port on the router's integrated switch, and exiting another. You are
    now burdening the router's integrated switch with LAN to LAN traffic.
    This is not desirable. Let the router do what it was designed to do
    (route packets) with the lightest load possible.


    Best Regards,
    News Reader

    steve wrote:
    > I wanted to see if I can get better performace with the network I
    > have.
    >
    > It is something that I inherited, I have always had the view of
    > leaving alone basically.
    > However in an effort to speed things up...
    >
    > I have a router connected to the interent, Wan port. I will call this
    > my WAN/router. This Wan/router has about 4 ports on it. Then there
    > is one cable running from there to a switch. From this switch feeds
    > all the other lines in the building to other switches, routers,
    > wireless routers in many cases computers.
    >
    > My question is, Would it be better to use up the extra ports on the
    > first WAN/router to connect to other swtiches and routers inside the
    > buidling, rather than as it is curently a single cable running from
    > that WAN/router to a swtich and then to other devices.
    >
    > My thinking is that right now, all the signals come into the first WAN/
    > router then out through a single port to the switch and other
    > devices.
    >
    > I'm just thinking maybe spreading it out a little using up some of the
    > other ports on the first WAN/router out to the network would help to
    > share things a little.
    >
    > If you have other suggestions I'm happy to entertain them but I would
    > like an answer to the question as at this moment this is what we have
    > and this is for a school where money is tight. I dont anticipate
    > making any changes in the near future.
    >
    > Regards


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