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Thread: Wireless help for Gaming

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Jun 2007
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    Wireless help for Gaming

    I am living in an apartment which provides free wireless internet, but only my laptop has a card. I was wondering what are the best cards for gaming for a desktop, and also wondering if a Router can pick up signals from another wireless router, so that I can connect my ps2 online also? I am looking for good performance and will probably buy a higain antenna too.

  2. #2

    wireless tweaks

    Quote Originally Posted by colyou View Post
    I am living in an apartment which provides free wireless internet, but only my laptop has a card. I was wondering what are the best cards for gaming for a desktop, and also wondering if a Router can pick up signals from another wireless router, so that I can connect my ps2 online also? I am looking for good performance and will probably buy a higain antenna too.
    Question #1:
    I was wondering what are the best cards for gaming for a desktop?

    Answer #1:
    The best wireless cards are made by D-Link and Zoom X-6 ADSL modems, they also have a wireless version of that for cable too. Zoom is quite reliable in terms of connectivity and has excellent security firewalls for being an all-in-one solution.

    Dispelling the rumor and myth about wireless communications, especially games, it's not the "bandwidth" that matters as in how many bits per second you get but rather the latency of the packets, or the ability to move those package to and from the source in a hurried manner without errors. People tend to get better connectivity with the 54G and 108G (Super G) standards of wireless communications, the Wireless Draft-N (300N) is somewhat of a laughing stock for online games that need ultra low ping times (low latency).

    Things that make your wireless Internet connection slow;

    1. Slow unresponsive components inline with your wireless router (like a modem or firewall appliance and then a modem).

    2. Incorrectly setting your router and client card for performance vs. distance. Believe it or not, the performance setting is only good if you have ideal settings and signal strength, in other words you have to have at least 86% signal strength or more in order to be good for the performance setting, go with distance instead, it has a more constant transmission level and has higher noise immunity. Microwaves, cell phones, and other wireless devices that operate in the 2.4 and 5.8 GHz spectrum will screw with your wireless stuff, so that is why you need a really strong signal to get descent results.

    3. Poor antenna gain and placement, the antennas that are packaged with the client and access point (Wireless Access Points aka WAPs) have either a specialty MIMO antenna like Linksys uses or a cheap 3 to 9 dBi rubber duck antenna. These are supposedly giving you 3 to 9 dBi but after doing my tests are when I was working in the field of wireless technology, I have found that it only applies to the center frequency of 2.4 or 5.8 GHz, which is really pretty bad. My suggestion is to get better antennas with higher gain, that will save you a lot of frustration. Also any number of solid objects that are not transparent to the 2.4 and 5.8 GHz microwave spectrum either reflects the signal and causes receive errors both on your wireless router and client card or absorbs the signal making any signal reaching it's destination extremely weak or non-existant.

    Note: As long as you don't use the 300N version from Linksys, I have a way for you to use standard wireless antennas that are meant for 54G / 108G routers and cards. Here is an interesting fact, I was in the engineering side of things for awhile. They are the exact same antenna my friend, just a different part number and price (more expensive). Sad eh?

    Question #2:
    Wondering if a Router can pick up signals from another wireless router, so that I can connect my ps2 online also?

    Answer #2:
    About access points (wireless routers), there are some wireless access points that can and some that cannot.

    What is the difference you ask?

    Simple the software / firmware on the wireless access point determines whether or not you can use the access point and connect to another access point, whether it is a "PEER", "RELAY", or "CLIENT" connection.

    All access points can physically connect to other access points, yes. What determines that is the operating software / BIOS / firmware for that router.
    Most high end routers can be used as a "Client" or an "AP". The Linksys APs do not support this currently (unfortunately).

    Now about the PS/2 wireless connector, if it is the standard Sony Wireless connection, you can connect to your wireless AP with that device without a problem.

    All you need to do is make sure you have the IP and MAC addresses entered on the router (for security reasons), engage the proper security protocols like WEP or WPA, etc. Making sure all the setting match your router and you should be good. The Sony PS/2 wireless says it does 108G but that is an upgrade to be released later, it's actually running at 54G.

    P.S. If you want really good wireless speed don't use a standard card or USB based wireless network device. I use a MiLAN ShAir Access PRO AP / Bridge with PoE (Power Over Ethernet), model MIL-W2332G. I also know this device like the back of my hand, I was the specialist in MiLAN products for Transition Networks of Eden Prairie and Minnetonka, Minnesota. This WAP can do the "Client", "Relay", "Peer", and "AP" modes without trouble, the best thing about this is, you can connect this device over an existing Ethernet connection 10 / 100 MBps and is fairly simple to use. Since it is professional grade you have a serial connection on the back of the unit where you can use a COM port connection to access the management that way too, not just on the network connection. Why does this have an Ethernet connection you may ask, it is meant for high end workstations and servers that use one of the router jacks for this device. The difference between the card / USB based devices and Ethernet connections is really simple. Just think of the wireless modems as the controllerless version of the WinModems of yesterday.
    Controllerless means it will bog your processor down making it do more work than necessary. The Ethernet based version has it's own processor, a NIC processor, and firewall, etc, all on board so it doesn't bog your connection nor your CPUs.

    Need more help? Just ask...

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Hey man I just bought the sprint broadband card its the compass 597 and its absolute crap im trying to find a good card and service for my laptop so I can play warhammer online I just reserved it and cant get a damn connection to play it I dont have an internet connection at my house whats the best wireless cinnection I can buy

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