Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Gas has gone up 25% here BC, CDN in the last 3 weeks

  1. #1
    Resident Rodent Randy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    British Columbia Canada
    Posts
    12,001

    Gas has gone up 25% here BC, CDN in the last 3 weeks

    fack me

    I was going to post a link to that thread, but the SG search results for "bullsh|t" were too numerous

    sometimes you have to think outside the box to get inside the box .

  2. #2
    MadDoctor Club Spammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    MadDoctors Wool.
    Posts
    1,721
    I know I only put good grade gas whatever that number is in my truck, and it fricking killing me.
    - Reps for being a smartass.
    SG Sh!!t List

    Bouncer, downhill, John, Kip Patterson, Roody, YeOldeStonecat, Ken, Philip, David, Indy, Noevo.

  3. #3
    Resident Rodent Randy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    British Columbia Canada
    Posts
    12,001
    I always wonder about the good grade going stale,prices are so high nobody buys it?

    I was going to post a link to that thread, but the SG search results for "bullsh|t" were too numerous

    sometimes you have to think outside the box to get inside the box .

  4. #4
    MadDoctor Club Spammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    MadDoctors Wool.
    Posts
    1,721
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    I always wonder about the good grade going stale,prices are so high nobody buys it?
    I'm wondering if it is even better, cleaner burning gas LOL
    - Reps for being a smartass.
    SG Sh!!t List

    Bouncer, downhill, John, Kip Patterson, Roody, YeOldeStonecat, Ken, Philip, David, Indy, Noevo.

  5. #5
    drink less beer, eh?

  6. #6
    Ohh Hell yeah.. Sava700's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    24,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Spammy View Post
    I'm wondering if it is even better, cleaner burning gas LOL
    there is no difference really to a normal car if its only a few points difference. When you get up to the racing fuel mixture then you see results but you quickly burn stuff up...

  7. #7
    MadDoctor Club Spammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    MadDoctors Wool.
    Posts
    1,721
    Quote Originally Posted by Sava700 View Post
    there is no difference really to a normal car if its only a few points difference. When you get up to the racing fuel mixture then you see results but you quickly burn stuff up...
    So is there any reason I should even put it in my truck?>
    - Reps for being a smartass.
    SG Sh!!t List

    Bouncer, downhill, John, Kip Patterson, Roody, YeOldeStonecat, Ken, Philip, David, Indy, Noevo.

  8. #8
    Token Dial-up User De Plano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,072
    Quote Originally Posted by Spammy View Post
    So is there any reason I should even put it in my truck?>
    More importantly is your truck even designed for premium gas? A lot of newer cars are desgined to run on cheaper gas and running premium can be bad for performance (only slighlty, but twenty cents more per gallon adds up, especially when you are putting twenty gallons in your truck).

  9. #9
    MadDoctor Club Spammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    MadDoctors Wool.
    Posts
    1,721
    Quote Originally Posted by De Plano View Post
    More importantly is your truck even designed for premium gas? A lot of newer cars are desgined to run on cheaper gas and running premium can be bad for performance (only slighlty, but twenty cents more per gallon adds up, especially when you are putting twenty gallons in your truck).
    I have a Ford F150 07
    - Reps for being a smartass.
    SG Sh!!t List

    Bouncer, downhill, John, Kip Patterson, Roody, YeOldeStonecat, Ken, Philip, David, Indy, Noevo.

  10. #10
    Moderator Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    30,761
    Personally I wouldnt bother Sammy.

  11. #11
    ♫♪ ♫♪ ♫♪ ♫♪ downhill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    My Own Private Idaho
    Posts
    34,796
    By the same token, buying the cheapest gas you can find, isn't all that great for an engine either.

    A lot of that cut rate stuff has a lot of water in it.

  12. #12
    Token Dial-up User De Plano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,072
    My Ford F150 '00 is running fine on regular. Why did you start with the premium? Did someone tell you to? Check the manual though. Someone on the boards might correct me, but that is what a auto shop teacher told me back in 89.

    Is four bucks once or twice a week something you will worry about? It is keeping me from buying my mom or brothers cars off them when they trade them in, but other folks won't care about that. Well, the premium and the poor gas mileage is what is stopping me from buying their cars
    Last edited by De Plano; 05-16-07 at 12:58 PM.

  13. #13
    Token Dial-up User De Plano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,072
    Here is one for you Randy


  14. #14
    R.I.P. 2015-05-13 minir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    27,942
    Blog Entries
    1
    Hi Spammy

    Hope this of use to you?
    ---

    Regular or Premium: choosing the right fuel grade
    by Jim Kerr
    ---

    Deciding what grade of gasoline to use in your vehicle has been a question asked by many readers. Should I use regular, or is it worth spending more for the premium grade fuel? While premium grade fuel may contain a few more additives, most vehicles will operate fine on regular grades. There are some vehicles out there where premium fuel is specified by the manufacturer. What happens if regular fuel or gasohol is used in these vehicles?


    Premium fuels have a higher resistance to pinging or detonation in the engine's combustion chamber than regular fuels do. Higher compression ratios, higher heat loads and higher vehicle loads all create an environment in the engine where the fuel tends to self ignite before the spark plug can properly fire the mixture. When this occurs too much, severe engine vibrations occur internally that can break piston rings, pistons and even damage bearings. We sometimes hear this as a rattling sound from the engine compartment when the vehicle is accelerated hard.

    When looking at vehicle fuel requirements in the owner's manuals, it will state whether regular fuel can be used, premium fuel is recommended, or premium fuel is required. It also often has this printed right at the fuel filler. If the specifications say premium fuel is recommended, you can use regular fuel for many driving conditions, especially if you are not placing high heat or acceleration loads on the vehicle. If any pinging does occur, the engine knock sensor will detect this and cause the ignition timing to retard. This will reduce the pinging, but can decrease performance and fuel economy. If premium fuel is required, use what the manufacturer recommends.

    Typically, when the manufacturer shows fuel requirements, they also list the minimum octane rating. It may typically be 87 octane if regular fuel is required or 91 octane rating for vehicles requiring premium fuel. Gasohol, a common name given to gasoline with small percentages of alcohol added to them has a higher octane rating than the gasoline by itself. This is because the alcohol evaporates quickly in the combustion chamber and absorbs heat that would cause pinging or detonation. Therefore, any gasohol type fuel with an octane rating equal or higher than the premium fuel will work fine in vehicles requiring premium fuel grades.

    Using fuel with alcohol in it does tend to lean the fuel mixture, but the oxygen sensor in the exhaust system detects that the engine is operating slightly lean and enriches the air/fuel mixture slightly, so the engine will burn slightly more fuel. However, there is probably more difference in fuel economy made by other driving factors such as outside temperatures, tire pressures, or road conditions than the fuel would make.

    Using gasohol in engines such as cars from the 70's or earlier, older snowmobiles, motorcycles or lawn equipment that do not have oxygen sensors will cause the engine to operate lean. If the air fuel mixture was already on the rich side, then it will actually run better, but if the air fuel ratio was already lean, then leaning the fuel mixture further can cause pistons to melt. The carburetor may need to be adjusted to compensate for the different fuel.

    All auto manufacturers allow gasohol with up to 10% alcohol in the fuel in vehicles equipped with oxygen sensors built in the last 15 to 20 years, so using gasohol is not a problem. As a point of interest, you may notice that some manufacturers such as GM, Ford and Chrysler are also marketing vehicles compatible with E85. This fuel is 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline. Currently, there are only a couple filling stations in Ottawa that are supplying this fuel, but the situation could change rapidly as ethanol production is ramped up to offset gasoline shortages in the future.

    E85 is used instead of straight ethanol for a couple reasons. First, the addition of gasoline to the ethanol makes it unfit for human consumption (a potential problem with pure ethanol). Secondly, alcohol does not evaporate as easily as gasoline at very low temperatures, so adding gasoline makes the engine easier to start when the thermometer drops.

    When pulling up to the pumps, check out the octane rating for each grade of fuel shown on the pumps. For most of us, regular grades will work just fine. Don't spend money on premium grades unless your car really needs it.

    ---

    Related Info
    ====

    Tips on improving fuel economy
    By Jim Kerr
    ---

    As gas prices continue to climb - or should I say jump - drivers are becoming more frustrated at the cost of everyday driving. While public transportation or walking may be an option for a few of us, most of us are dependent upon our vehicles. Fortunately, there are ways to reduce fuel costs and some can be used right away.


    The first tip is to check your tire pressures. An under-inflated tire has a higher rolling resistance and uses much more power from the engine. While the recommended tire pressures for your vehicle should be in the owner's manual or on the door jamb decal, inflating them a couple PSI higher will help decrease rolling resistance. Unfortunately, higher pressures also may make the ride harsher and the tires may wear slightly more in the centre. Check the tires a minimum of once a month or more often if there are large changes in outside air temperature, and never inflate a tire more than the maximum shown on the tire sidewall. It could be dangerous.

    A wheel alignment can also save fuel. Keeping the wheels pointed straight ahead reduces rolling resistance. A four-wheel alignment will ensure that the complete vehicle is pointed straight down the road. If your vehicle is sitting a little crooked because the rear wheels are not in alignment, then the side of the body creates more aerodynamic drag too. Make sure that any chin spoilers beneath the front of the car are in place. Many newer vehicles use a small lower shield to block air beneath the vehicle. This can be damaged by parking curbs or tough snow banks and under-car drag increases.

    Remove running boards, windshield visors and other add-on equipment. They all create drag. However, if you drive on gravel or in mud, the running boards might be worthwhile. Trucks can benefit from reduced drag by using a box cover. Some are quickly removable so that the utility of the truck is not hampered.

    Turn your engine off while the vehicle is stopped. Hybrid vehicles obtain some of their fuel economy improvements by stopping the engine as much as possible. You can too. If you must sit for longer than about 30 seconds, it is cheaper to turn the engine off and restart it rather than let it idle.

    If your vehicle has been down the road quite a bit, it might be worth spending some money on a tune-up. One intermittently misfiring spark plug can decrease fuel economy dramatically even though the vehicle appears to be running fine. Check the spark plug wires too. High resistance in a plug wire can cause misfiring sparkplugs.

    Poor heater performance is an indicator that your car is wasting fuel. One of the main inputs for determining fuel delivery is engine coolant temperature. If the engine's thermostat is opening too soon, it takes longer for the engine to get up to operating temperature. You are wasting fuel all that time. Often, a new thermostat is all that is needed so the engine warms up quickly.

    Changing driving habits has to be the easiest way of improving fuel economy. Combine trips when possible and if you have to stop at several places, organize so you have the shortest driving route. Avoid quick starts and if you have a manual transmission, shift to the next higher gear as soon as the engine will pull the vehicle smoothly. Avoid stopping unless it is required. Often you can coast up behind traffic and they will start moving before you have to stop. Anytime you use the brakes, you are converting energy in motion into wasted heat energy. Conserve that energy by keeping the vehicle rolling.

    Lighter vehicles accelerate easier and therefore typically get better fuel economy. You can often reduce the weight of your vehicle by removing unnecessary items from the trunk. Do you really need that snow shovel or those sand bags? That winter survival gear you packed can go back in the house. Every pound helps.

    Of course, there are more expensive ways to improve fuel economy. Buy a new small compact car. Convert to another fuel such as natural gas or propane. Drive a diesel. In the future, we may even have the option of using alcohol or hydrogen. One thing is for sure - costs will increase. The worldwide demand for fuel is increasing, especially in countries like India and China. The supply of oil is limited. Conserving fuel will save in the pocket book now and in the future.

    --

    minir

Similar Threads

  1. Hawaii caps gas prices
    By Meggie in forum General Discussion Board
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-16-07, 12:42 PM
  2. Another Gas Thread......
    By Prey521 in forum Automotive
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 07-27-06, 03:31 PM
  3. Do you run premium gas? Do you need to?
    By De Plano in forum General Discussion Board
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 05-25-05, 10:12 AM
  4. Gas Prices will jump 25cents in two weeks!
    By Sava700 in forum General Discussion Board
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-05-05, 12:00 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •