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Thread: Help needed with intermittent internet

  1. #41
    $Bill
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    Warren H wrote:
    >
    > He's using the server as his LAN router. The Netgear router isn't
    > routing in the lay sense of the word. That is, in the topography of his
    > network, it's not directing traffic here or there. It is only sitting
    > there between his server (which is the real router on his LAN), and the
    > cable modem, but it's opening packets, and repackaging them as a router
    > does, and not simply passing them through as a bridge would.


    I didn't get that from the picture he supplied which I inserted below.
    The server isn't even mentioned separately and local routing is basically
    uneeded and handled by the switch. Either the Linksys or the Netgear
    has to be handling the external routing.

    Various computers on the LAN (I assume this includes the server)
    V
    Network switch
    V
    Linksys
    V
    Netgear cable modem/router
    V
    Comcast headend equipment

    GET THE NETGEAR REPLACED WITH A PLAIN OLD MODEM !!!!!

    Like a Motorola or Linksys and tell those idiots to provision it and if
    they don't know how, have them ask another ISP or Google and find out.

  2. #42
    JM
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet


    "$Bill" <news@SPAMOLAtodbe.com> wrote in message
    news:464272f0$0$9934$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    > Warren H wrote:
    >>
    >> He's using the server as his LAN router. The Netgear router isn't routing
    >> in the lay sense of the word. That is, in the topography of his network,
    >> it's not directing traffic here or there. It is only sitting there
    >> between his server (which is the real router on his LAN), and the cable
    >> modem, but it's opening packets, and repackaging them as a router does,
    >> and not simply passing them through as a bridge would.

    >
    > I didn't get that from the picture he supplied which I inserted below.
    > The server isn't even mentioned separately and local routing is basically
    > uneeded and handled by the switch. Either the Linksys or the Netgear
    > has to be handling the external routing.


    The Linksys is handling the "external routing," in terms of your question,
    although I think there is a little misunderstanding about this function.
    The Netgear is the cable mode, for sure, but it also "routes" our static
    public IP address to/from the Linksys, which I have configured for static IP
    address, NAT, and no DHCP. DHCP is handled by the Novell server.

    Some confusion surrounds exactly what functions are provided by the Netgear,
    and I believe our problem is mostly one of semantics and how each of us
    thinks of "router" vs "modem." The Netgear is indeed a router, at least in
    terms of Comcast's system, but it's not playing that role in terms of the
    subscriber network. This has caused great problems for me in my
    conversations with Comcast, because my basic view is this:

    - a "modem" is a device that converts/reconverts a particular type of
    carrier signal to a signal that can be used by computers and networking
    equipment
    - a "router" is a device that specifies where network traffic goes

    So, what is the Netgear doing? In my mind it's being a "modem," not a
    "router." However, in Comcast's world it's very much a router. Practically
    speaking, Comcast doesn't route internet traffic "to" the subscriber device
    (router, switch, NIC, etc) to which their equipment is attached. They route
    internet traffic "to" their device, which then "passes to" the subscriber
    device.

    This is how I understand it. Of course, my understanding of all this is
    changing almost by the hour, so don't hesitate to shoot that one full of
    holes, too.


    > Various computers on the LAN (I assume this includes the server)


    Yes.


    > GET THE NETGEAR REPLACED WITH A PLAIN OLD MODEM !!!!!


    My thoughts and words precisely to at least 2-3 of the Comcast support
    people. However, this view reflects a misunderstanding of how Comcast (and
    perhaps cable providers in general??) do things. With a business account
    using a *static* IP address, there is no such beast as a "plain old modem."
    Plain Old Modems are for residential and business accounts with a "dynamic"
    IP address.

    In the Comcast system, there is no method of assigning a static IP address
    to a plain old modem.

    And, what's even more frustrating, is that Comcast in my area offers exactly
    ONE device for business/static provisioning: The Netgear unit we have.

    jm













  3. #43
    Warren H
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    JM wrote:
    > - a "modem" is a device that converts/reconverts a particular type of
    > carrier signal to a signal that can be used by computers and
    > networking equipment
    > - a "router" is a device that specifies where network traffic goes
    >
    > So, what is the Netgear doing? In my mind it's being a "modem," not a
    > "router."


    A modem is a bridge. A bridge is normally used to connect two different
    kinds of physical networks. In this case, it is a bridge between the HFC
    network, and the Ethernet network. It operates at layer two of the OSI
    network. It doesn't open the IP packets; it only changes the physical
    medium over which they're carried.

    A router can direct traffic to multiple devices, like the lay definition
    would infer. But it doesn't have to. A router, in terms of completer
    networking, is a device that works on layer three of the OSI model. It
    opens the IP packets, and inspects them. Based on that inspection, it
    can direct traffic to multiple devices, or it could do a number of other
    things.

    In it's application here, it is primarily used to segregate the
    subscriber's network from the Comcast network. TCP/IP traffic using
    private IP addresses cannot travel between networks. Neither can
    transport or network protocols that aren't TCP/IP. The primary purpose
    of using a router at this point is segregation of networks, not
    direction of traffic. Forget the common dictionary definition of what a
    route is, or that the device happens to be named a router. Just because
    it's named a router doesn't mean it's directing traffic between multiple
    devices, and just because it isn't directing traffic between multiple
    devices doesn't mean it's not a router in networking terms.



    > However, in Comcast's world it's very much a router. Practically
    > speaking, Comcast doesn't route internet traffic "to" the subscriber
    > device (router, switch, NIC, etc) to which their equipment is
    > attached. They route internet traffic "to" their device, which then
    > "passes to" the subscriber device.
    >
    > This is how I understand it. Of course, my understanding of all this
    > is changing almost by the hour, so don't hesitate to shoot that one
    > full of holes, too.


    You're using a layman's concept of what a router is. Remember we're
    talking networking here. When I say "router", I'm talking about a device
    that works on level 3 of the OSI model, and therefore is partially
    opening packets in order to decide what to do with them. I don't care if
    there's only one path in and out on each side. That's not relevant in
    networking terms.


    >> Various computers on the LAN (I assume this includes the

    server)
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >
    >> GET THE NETGEAR REPLACED WITH A PLAIN OLD MODEM !!!!!

    >
    > My thoughts and words precisely to at least 2-3 of the Comcast support
    > people. However, this view reflects a misunderstanding of how Comcast
    > (and perhaps cable providers in general??) do things. With a business
    > account using a *static* IP address, there is no such beast as a
    > "plain old modem." Plain Old Modems are for residential and business
    > accounts with a "dynamic" IP address.
    >
    > In the Comcast system, there is no method of assigning a static IP
    > address to a plain old modem.


    It's mostly a business decision to use a combo device. They *can* assign
    a static IP address to a customer's equipment with just a modem. The
    modem's IP address, a 10.x.x.x address, is only used to manage the
    modem, and is not involved in how traffic gets to or through it. Before
    DOCSIS, IP wasn't even used to manage the modem, so modems didn't even
    have IP addresses. (The exception was the LanCity system, which could
    really be thought of as an early version of DOCSIS.)

    The apparent reason why they use a combo device for business customers
    is that business customers often have more complex networks than home
    users, and the router ensures that the two networks are segregated --
    and are segregated by a device that the customer can't accidentally take
    out of the picture. Essentially, they're afraid that the customer's
    complex, mission critical network is going to be operated by someone who
    doesn't understand the OSI model, and why it's essential to have a level
    3 device segregating the networks.

    > And, what's even more frustrating, is that Comcast in my area offers
    > exactly ONE device for business/static provisioning: The Netgear unit
    > we have.


    Then they need to get people who know how to manage it.

    When you asked them about a "sleep mode", and they said that there was
    no such thing, they were overlooking the ability of the router to block
    IP services based on a schedule. Either they were having a cognitive
    disconnect, and didn't realize you were talking about the whole device,
    and not just the modem part of the combo, or they really don't know what
    control they have over their router.

    At this point, my confidence that it's the router, not the modem, is
    high. You need to be talking to someone who not only knows the box is a
    combo device, but understands the difference between the modem and the
    router parts, and what they each do. And I'm starting to get the feeling
    (based on what you said earlier) that you're not clear about what a
    router is as well. Perhaps you don't normally need to know, but whoever
    you talk to at Comcast better know, and in this case you need to know so
    you can tell whether they know. In other words, someone needs to
    understand that a router really does.

    (Hint: "A 'router' is a device that specifies where network traffic
    goes," as said earlier.)

    --
    Warren H.

    ==========
    Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
    employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
    Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
    coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
    response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
    to go outside now.

    Maintain your landscape with Black & Decker:
    http://www.holzemville.com/mall/blackanddecker





  4. #44
    $Bill
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    JM wrote:
    >
    >>GET THE NETGEAR REPLACED WITH A PLAIN OLD MODEM !!!!!

    >
    >
    > My thoughts and words precisely to at least 2-3 of the Comcast support
    > people. However, this view reflects a misunderstanding of how Comcast (and
    > perhaps cable providers in general??) do things. With a business account
    > using a *static* IP address, there is no such beast as a "plain old modem."
    > Plain Old Modems are for residential and business accounts with a "dynamic"
    > IP address.
    >
    > In the Comcast system, there is no method of assigning a static IP address
    > to a plain old modem.


    You're not assigning the IP to the modem, but to the router connected to the
    modem. In your case it's all in one Netgear box. Many people have static
    IPs to their networks (1 or more) - they just pay a few $/mo for the static
    IP(s) and deal with it at the router.

    > And, what's even more frustrating, is that Comcast in my area offers exactly
    > ONE device for business/static provisioning: The Netgear unit we have.


    There's no reason for this. Many ISPs will let you convert from a dynamic IP
    to a static IP for $1/mo. It shouldn't make any difference to them what kind
    of modem you're using as long as it's on their list of supported devices (and
    most ISPs will support several modems). There's something really inept going
    on here IMO. It's just a matter of config'ing your router to the static IP.

  5. #45
    JM
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet


    "Warren H" <wholzem@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:u4KdnYvCLvq4wt7bnZ2dnUVZ_tijnZ2d@comcast.com...
    > JM wrote:
    >> - a "modem" is a device that converts/reconverts a particular type of
    >> carrier signal to a signal that can be used by computers and
    >> networking equipment
    >> - a "router" is a device that specifies where network traffic goes
    >>
    >> So, what is the Netgear doing? In my mind it's being a "modem," not a
    >> "router."

    >
    > A modem is a bridge. A bridge is normally used to connect two different
    > kinds of physical networks. In this case, it is a bridge between the HFC
    > network, and the Ethernet network. It operates at layer two of the OSI
    > network. It doesn't open the IP packets; it only changes the physical
    > medium over which they're carried.
    >
    > A router can direct traffic to multiple devices, like the lay definition
    > would infer. But it doesn't have to. A router, in terms of completer
    > networking, is a device that works on layer three of the OSI model. It
    > opens the IP packets, and inspects them. Based on that inspection, it
    > can direct traffic to multiple devices, or it could do a number of other
    > things.
    >
    > In it's application here, it is primarily used to segregate the
    > subscriber's network from the Comcast network. TCP/IP traffic using
    > private IP addresses cannot travel between networks. Neither can
    > transport or network protocols that aren't TCP/IP. The primary purpose
    > of using a router at this point is segregation of networks, not
    > direction of traffic. Forget the common dictionary definition of what a
    > route is, or that the device happens to be named a router. Just because
    > it's named a router doesn't mean it's directing traffic between multiple
    > devices, and just because it isn't directing traffic between multiple
    > devices doesn't mean it's not a router in networking terms.
    >
    >
    >
    >> However, in Comcast's world it's very much a router. Practically
    >> speaking, Comcast doesn't route internet traffic "to" the subscriber
    >> device (router, switch, NIC, etc) to which their equipment is
    >> attached. They route internet traffic "to" their device, which then
    >> "passes to" the subscriber device.
    >>
    >> This is how I understand it. Of course, my understanding of all this
    >> is changing almost by the hour, so don't hesitate to shoot that one
    >> full of holes, too.

    >
    > You're using a layman's concept of what a router is. Remember we're
    > talking networking here. When I say "router", I'm talking about a device
    > that works on level 3 of the OSI model, and therefore is partially
    > opening packets in order to decide what to do with them. I don't care if
    > there's only one path in and out on each side. That's not relevant in
    > networking terms.
    >
    >
    > >> Various computers on the LAN (I assume this includes the

    > server)
    >>
    >> Yes.
    >>
    >>
    >>> GET THE NETGEAR REPLACED WITH A PLAIN OLD MODEM !!!!!

    >>
    >> My thoughts and words precisely to at least 2-3 of the Comcast support
    >> people. However, this view reflects a misunderstanding of how Comcast
    >> (and perhaps cable providers in general??) do things. With a business
    >> account using a *static* IP address, there is no such beast as a
    >> "plain old modem." Plain Old Modems are for residential and business
    >> accounts with a "dynamic" IP address.
    >>
    >> In the Comcast system, there is no method of assigning a static IP
    >> address to a plain old modem.

    >
    > It's mostly a business decision to use a combo device. They *can* assign
    > a static IP address to a customer's equipment with just a modem. The
    > modem's IP address, a 10.x.x.x address, is only used to manage the
    > modem, and is not involved in how traffic gets to or through it. Before
    > DOCSIS, IP wasn't even used to manage the modem, so modems didn't even
    > have IP addresses. (The exception was the LanCity system, which could
    > really be thought of as an early version of DOCSIS.)
    >
    > The apparent reason why they use a combo device for business customers
    > is that business customers often have more complex networks than home
    > users, and the router ensures that the two networks are segregated --
    > and are segregated by a device that the customer can't accidentally take
    > out of the picture. Essentially, they're afraid that the customer's
    > complex, mission critical network is going to be operated by someone who
    > doesn't understand the OSI model, and why it's essential to have a level
    > 3 device segregating the networks.
    >
    >> And, what's even more frustrating, is that Comcast in my area offers
    >> exactly ONE device for business/static provisioning: The Netgear unit
    >> we have.

    >
    > Then they need to get people who know how to manage it.
    >
    > When you asked them about a "sleep mode", and they said that there was
    > no such thing, they were overlooking the ability of the router to block
    > IP services based on a schedule. Either they were having a cognitive
    > disconnect, and didn't realize you were talking about the whole device,
    > and not just the modem part of the combo, or they really don't know what
    > control they have over their router.
    >
    > At this point, my confidence that it's the router, not the modem, is
    > high. You need to be talking to someone who not only knows the box is a
    > combo device, but understands the difference between the modem and the
    > router parts, and what they each do. And I'm starting to get the feeling
    > (based on what you said earlier) that you're not clear about what a
    > router is as well. Perhaps you don't normally need to know, but whoever
    > you talk to at Comcast better know, and in this case you need to know so
    > you can tell whether they know. In other words, someone needs to
    > understand that a router really does.
    >
    > (Hint: "A 'router' is a device that specifies where network traffic goes,"
    > as said earlier.)


    There's a whole bunch up there that my ego would like to clarify, but it
    likely would detract from the target. I do understand what a router does.
    I
    do understand the OSI model. My attempts to generalize and present the
    various miscommunications between myself and a room full of Comcast support
    people over the past 4 weeks misrepresented the situation.
    That a router operates at layer 3 is a fact. That it does much more than
    "route" traffic also is a fact. However, I'm having trouble seeing the
    pertinence of this information, in the context of your theory concerning
    possible cause. If I'm interpreting your comments correctly, you think the
    router might be blocking IP traffic according to a schedule. If that's so,
    then would we see the internet "down" specific times of day? Should it be
    predictably recurring? Could there be other times of the day when the
    internet is intermittent? Finally, would a reset of the Netgear "fix" this
    type of problem?

    jm










  6. #46
    Warren H
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    JM wrote:
    > There's a whole bunch up there that my ego would like to clarify, but
    > it likely would detract from the target. I do understand what a
    > router does. I
    > do understand the OSI model. My attempts to generalize and present
    > the
    > various miscommunications between myself and a room full of Comcast
    > support
    > people over the past 4 weeks misrepresented the situation.
    > That a router operates at layer 3 is a fact. That it does much more
    > than
    > "route" traffic also is a fact. However, I'm having trouble seeing
    > the
    > pertinence of this information, in the context of your theory
    > concerning possible cause. If I'm interpreting your comments
    > correctly, you think the router might be blocking IP traffic according
    > to a schedule. If that's so, then would we see the internet "down"
    > specific times of day? Should it be predictably recurring? Could
    > there be other times of the day when the internet is intermittent?
    > Finally, would a reset of the Netgear "fix" this type of problem?



    Well, here's where we are:

    Comcast has stated that the modem is not going down, and there's nothing
    in the modem logs to indicate a problem.

    You've isolated your LAN from the Netgear box.

    That narrows things down to the router in the Netgear box.

    You've implied that this happens every night, over night. That would
    seem to indicate a regularly scheduled event.

    So possible issues include:
    - The router is configured wrong, possibly blocking on a schedule.
    - The router has some other problem.
    - The router, and the other two also, are all from the same batch,
    and are all defective.
    - You really didn't isolate your LAN from the Netgear.
    - Comcast isn't being honest about the modem not having a problem.

    That's a pretty short list, but it could get longer if one of the last
    two items on it are where the problem is. But assuming that you did
    isolate the LAN from the Netgear box, and assuming that Comcast is
    correct that there aren't any problems up to and including the modem
    that's in the Netgear box, then we're down to the something with the
    router in the Netgear box.

    So assuming that isolation troubleshooting has been properly done, and
    the results have been correctly reported, it's now time to focus on that
    router. I'm suggesting the blocking schedule because the context of your
    reports of your conversations with Comcast infer that they aren't aware
    of a way that the Netgear box can shut-down sometime overnight, and your
    reports on when the problem happens, for the most part, point towards
    the same timeframe each day. But that's just one example of what it
    could be, and something that I'd look at first in the router
    configuration.

    My point is that isolation troubleshooting has narrowed us down to the
    router. The symptoms reported are not inconsistent with a router
    problem. (They were inconsistent with a bridge problem.)

    What else can be done?

    You can physically disconnect the LAN instead of just disabling the NIC.
    That would confirm that you have isolated the problem to someplace
    outside your LAN. And Comcast can recheck the modem logs, and recheck
    the RF signal to the modem. If everyone re-does, and confirms the steps
    they've taken to isolate the problem, then we're right back at the
    router. And so far, I've seen absolutely zip on the router
    configuration. The only thing we know is that three different physical
    routers have been in place during the course of this problem.

    Speaking of things I haven't seen addressed, a number of times I've
    asked if they only replaced the combo box, or if they also replaced the
    power brick for it as well. And I've also asked about what other
    electrical equipment might be on the same circuit. Even if you can't get
    into the router to check the configuration, you should be able to make
    sure that it's getting clean power.

    I'm not saying I'm locked into the blocking schedule theory. But I am
    saying that if all the information that has been offered is correct, and
    all the methodology has been sound, then we have isolated the problem to
    that Netgear router packed in the same box as the modem. And despite
    replacing the combo box twice already, the problem is still there.

    So what else can it be? Either you need to go back and re-do the
    isolation troubleshooting again, and see if you wind-up someplace else,
    or the problem is in the router. And they symptoms are not inconsistent
    with something that can happen with a router.

    Where else can we go with this?

    --
    Warren H.

    ==========
    Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
    employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
    Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
    coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
    response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
    to go outside now.

    Maintain your landscape with Black & Decker:
    http://www.holzemville.com/mall/blackanddecker




  7. #47
    $Bill
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    Warren H wrote:
    >
    > Where else can we go with this?


    To a tech that can configure something other than a Netgear combo modem. ;)


  8. #48
    Eric
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    On May 11, 1:43 am, "$Bill" <n...@SPAMOLAtodbe.com> wrote:
    > Warren H wrote:
    >
    > > Where else can we go with this?

    >
    > To a tech that can configure something other than a Netgear combo modem. ;)


    To a tech that can get a line tech out to set up the amps feeding the
    modem.

    To a tech that understands that just because a modem is "in spec"
    doesn't mean it will work properly.

    To a tech that will actually troubleshoot and not just swap out a
    perfectly good modem.


  9. #49
    JM
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet


    "Eric" <egrumling@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1179551066.109815.121600@e65g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
    > On May 11, 1:43 am, "$Bill" <n...@SPAMOLAtodbe.com> wrote:
    >> Warren H wrote:
    >>
    >> > Where else can we go with this?

    >>
    >> To a tech that can configure something other than a Netgear combo modem.
    >> ;)

    >
    > To a tech that can get a line tech out to set up the amps feeding the
    > modem.
    >
    > To a tech that understands that just because a modem is "in spec"
    > doesn't mean it will work properly.
    >
    > To a tech that will actually troubleshoot and not just swap out a
    > perfectly good modem.



    I could not agree more. After another week watching this thing go down
    every single night and having to reset it every single morning, I'm
    convinced there is a signal problem to the modem that could be identified if
    a competent tech would perform some real troubleshooting. But the tech they
    keep sending does not qualify. In all seriousness, he appears to have a
    learning disability. I'm not being mean. I'm just stating the truth. I
    feel sorry for him, really, but the fact remains that Comcast is not
    bringing high-level resources to bear on this problem.

    jm







  10. #50
    Eric
    Guest

    Re: Help needed with intermittent internet

    On May 21, 10:21 am, "JM" <j...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Eric" <egruml...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:1179551066.109815.121600@e65g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 11, 1:43 am, "$Bill" <n...@SPAMOLAtodbe.com> wrote:
    > >> Warren H wrote:

    >
    > >> > Where else can we go with this?

    >
    > >> To a tech that can configure something other than a Netgear combo modem.
    > >> ;)

    >
    > > To a tech that can get a line tech out to set up the amps feeding the
    > > modem.

    >
    > > To a tech that understands that just because a modem is "in spec"
    > > doesn't mean it will work properly.

    >
    > > To a tech that will actually troubleshoot and not just swap out a
    > > perfectly good modem.

    >
    > I could not agree more. After another week watching this thing go down
    > every single night and having to reset it every single morning, I'm
    > convinced there is a signal problem to the modem that could be identified if
    > a competent tech would perform some real troubleshooting. But the tech they
    > keep sending does not qualify. In all seriousness, he appears to have a
    > learning disability. I'm not being mean. I'm just stating the truth. I
    > feel sorry for him, really, but the fact remains that Comcast is not
    > bringing high-level resources to bear on this problem.
    >
    > jm


    You mean they keep sending the same guy? I'm sorry to say this, but
    you're going to have to contact your sales rep (since this is a
    commercial account, you'll have a sales rep), and demand they escalate
    the issue to the local supervisor. It is unacceptable for them to
    continue to send the same guy out time and time again without
    resolution. Make sure you make your rep aware of all that has
    transpired.


  11. #51
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1

    Comcast VPN problems with Netgear cg814ccr

    I won't go into details about their lack of skill and sending the same person out each time, I do want to spread the information I have from something somewhat similar that may or may not help.

    I just got Comcast business, I upgraded from Comcast home. When I first had it installed it was very flaky. I would get intermittent connectivity and speed. VPN, XBox Live, and Vonage were all terribly affected. I troubleshot with their technicians and we determined it was a bad Netgear Cable modem, which they promptly came out and replaced. After it was replaced I still had poor VPN performance (both Cisco VPN, Juniper SSL VPN) as well as poor XBOX live. All of which worked perfectly with Comcast Home internet service. Again I called and worked with their technicians, they verified the firewall on the Netgear was disabled, but it turned out to be Smart Packet Detection on the Netgear which was causing all the problems. They shut off Smart Packet Detection and everything has worked perfectly since. Maybe you can call them and ask about that.

    The symptoms I saw with this were most clear with Ethereal, showing severe packet loss (retries galore) when VPN'd, but clean as a whistle when not VPN'd.

    Again, not sure if this is totally related as your symptoms seem to be time related, but perhaps there is a scheduled *something* that is triggering the Smart Packet Detection.

  12. #52
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1
    Sorry to bring up this old topic. Are any of the original posters still around? It was an interesting read and I'd like to know if a solution was ever found.

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