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Thread: U.S.-Mexico Agreement Provides Social Security Funds to Illegal Aliens

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    U.S.-Mexico Agreement Provides Social Security Funds to Illegal Aliens

    TREA Senior Citizens League announced last week that after numerous refusals over three and a half years, the Social Security Administration finally released the first known public copy of the U.S.-Mexico Social Security Totalization Agreement. The Social Security Administration was forced to make the disclosure in response to lawsuits filed under the Freedom of Information Act by the League, a nonpartisan seniors' advocacy group. The agreement between the United States and Mexico was signed in June 2004, and awaits President Bush's signature. If signed by President Bush, the Social Security Agreement Totalization agreement will automatically go into effect after 60 days unless either House of Congress votes to reject it.

    The U.S.-Mexico Totalization agreement has become controversial because it could allow millions of illegal aliens from Mexico to draw billions of dollars from the U.S. Social Security Trust Fund, creating huge new pressures on the Social Security program itself. Currently, federal law does not bar wages submitted for illegal work from counting towards social security benefits. Thus, if an illegal alien worker in the United States today gets a "work authorized" Social Security number through the Totalization Agreement, that worker would be able claim credit for work performed legally or illegally. The same would happen if Congress adopts a guest worker program to legalize the millions of illegal aliens currently in the country.

    According to TREA, the Social Security Administration expects the Social Security Trust Fund to pay out more than it accrues by year 2017 and to be exhausted by 2040. "The Social Security Administration itself warns that Social Security is within decades of bankruptcy--yet, they seem to have no problem making agreements that hasten its demise," said the Chairman of the Senior Citizens League, Ralph McCutchen.

    http://www.davickservices.com/US-Mex...0Agreement.htm
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    Totalization is just another way to blur the line between sovereign nations, and os another piece of evidence in the SPP's "North American Union" plan.

    Funny how all I heard when I told people about that was "oh please, they'd never do that." The best pooh-poohing comes when someone will point out that Bush hasn't signed it yet. They completely ignore the fact that it should have never been agreed to in the first place.

    "U.S. Social Security Trust Fund": eye-roll worthy. There IS no pot o' gold with SOCIAL SECURITY stamped across it. The fact people my age (31) are paying into something we're never going to receive the benefit from is doubly insulting.

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    hopefully wont pass

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    Forum Techie A_old's Avatar
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    time to move to canadia if it does lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amro View Post
    time to move to canadia if it does lol
    Canada is part of this new "cooperative" effort...starts with the poorer Mexican people, and eventually will filter up north.

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    Totalization agreements have been around for 29 years, starting with Italy.

    Everything else in the post is incorrect. There is no secrecy, they do NOT give any foreign worker access to US Social Security - they do exactly the opposite, making sure that the worker is covered under their native country's plan. What they do is eliminate duplicate taxation

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    Quote Originally Posted by Burke View Post
    Canada is part of this new "cooperative" effort...starts with the poorer Mexican people, and eventually will filter up north.

    It's been in effect for Canada for 23 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kip Patterson View Post
    Totalization agreements have been around for 29 years, starting with Italy.

    Everything else in the post is incorrect. There is no secrecy, they do NOT give any foreign worker access to US Social Security - they do exactly the opposite, making sure that the worker is covered under their native sountry's plan. What they do is eliminate duplicate taxation
    thx for the clarification

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kip Patterson View Post
    It's been in effect for Canada for 23 years.
    Yes, I meant the overall blurring of the lines of national sovereignty.

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    The U.S.-Mexico Agreement contains the same provisions as the totalization
    agreements we have with 20 other countries. However, Mexico is very different
    from the other countries with which we have agreements for a couple of critical
    reasons:
    1. Mexicans represent almost 70 percent, according to DHS, of the estimated
    10 million illegal aliens currently residing in the United States. Among
    the other 20 countries, South Korea and Canada have the next largest
    percentages of nationals residing here illegally - 0.07 percent of the total
    illegal population.
    2. The economic disparity between the United States and Mexico, combined
    with the fact that our countries share a land border, has generated
    migration from Mexico to the United States at levels not comparable to
    any of the other 20 countries.
    “"A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer."”

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    most importantly--

    . SSA's assessment of Mexico's social security system, including the
    reliability of its data and the potential for fraud, was cursory at best.

    The agreement would increase the number of illegal aliens and their
    family members who could qualify for U.S. social security benefits.
    Current law permits aliens who obtain permanent resident status in
    the United States to claim social security coverage credit for work
    they performed while in here illegally. The U.S.-Mexico
    agreement does not change this law, but it permits such aliens to
    qualify for benefits with only six coverage quarters (1 ½ years)
    instead of the 40 quarters (10 years) that are currently required. It
    also waives certain restrictions on the payment of benefits to these
    aliens' dependents abroad.

    SSA's estimates of the cost of this agreement are "highly uncertain" and
    are based on unjustifiably low estimates of expected beneficiaries. In fact,
    SSA's cost estimate, according to GAO, does not take into account any of
    the millions of Mexicans currently working here without authorization.



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    “"A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer."”

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    U.S. law bars aliens living here illegally from receiving social security benefits. However, until 2004, the law permitted aliens to claim credit for work performed while here illegally if the aliens either left the United States or obtained legal status in the United States. If such work - either alone or in combination with work performed while here legally - amounted to the 40 quarters of work required to become eligible for social security benefits, these aliens (and their spouses and dependents) would receive full benefits.

    Under the new agreement it is 6 quarters....
    also-
    Senate Finance Committee's report on H.R. 743, "individuals who begin working illegally and later obtain legal status could still use their illegal earnings to qualify for Social Security benefits" despite this new provision


    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-.../1454019/posts
    “"A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer."”

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    Friday, January 5, 2007...

    As a result of lawsuits, the U.S. government released this week the actual U.S.-Mexico Social Security Totalization Agreement, an understanding signed between the Bush administration and the Mexican government in 2004 that would funnel billions of Social Security funds to Mexican citizens.

    "A law called the Social Security Protection Act of 2004 forbids illegal immigrants from claiming Social Security benefits — but a loophole exists," Phillips explained.

    "If an immigrant gains what's called a valid ‘work-authorized' Social Security number at some point, then he or she could eventually file a claim for benefits. The government would use all earnings to calculate the retirement benefit — even earnings while working illegally," Phillips added.



    http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles...050107Pact.htm
    “"A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer."”

    Bruce Lee

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