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Thread: How to setup windows server 2003 with broadband connection from ISP?

  1. #1
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    Unhappy How to setup windows server 2003 with broadband connection from ISP?

    Hi all,
    Wonder if any one can teach me how to setup windows server 2003 without a NAT router?

    which mean

    Broadband connection from ISP -> windows server 2003 -> router OR 2 workstations from the windows server 2003 PC LAN port.

    My ISP does not give static IP, purpose of the setup is to host my own website, manage my other PCs at home and learn more about window servers..

    Do a search and found out that the windows server 2003 pc can actually "act" as a router by using mean of the RRAS but how to configure the RRAS to link to the other workstations?

    Hope someone able to help and give advice.
    Thank you..



    Found a very good articles by YeOldeStonecat but that is only when i have a router to link up the servers and workstation. But can't seen to find one which using RRAS or without a router..

    http://www.speedguide.net/read_articles.php?id=1660

  2. #2
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Gimme til tomorrow to reply...rushing out of the office now for a boat ride to a network 911.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
    Guinness for Strength!!!

  3. #3
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    thank mate!

  4. #4
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    Well to start with the very basics your server will need to have two NICs. One for the outside WAN interface and one for the inside LAN interface. Configuring thre PCs is basically nothing at all as long as they are all set to get IPs via DHCP, the default. You will also need a switch, you will connect the LAN interface of the server and the PCs to this.

    Are you sure about running a public web server on a server that will also be serving as you AD DC? That is generally a very bad idea as it leaves a nice big opening into your internal network. You might want to rethink the setup a bit.

  5. #5
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Sorry to not get back on this thread yesterday..ended up being a very very bad weekend for me. Unfortunately I don't have much time today either...I lost a good friend last night to cancer..we'll be drinking in his honor shortly.

    OK....so I'm assuming we're talking about vanilla Server 2003 here, yes? Not Small Business Server?

    We'll be starting with 2x network cards. When you have them installed....you'll see 2x connections in your network properties...by default something like LAN1 and LAN2. Rename them to keep things simple...right click and rename..what I do is called one WAN and the other one LAN.

    Have you run DCPromo yet? Meaning..is she already running as a domain controller?

    Take your LAN connection...and assign it the IP address that's in the range you wish to use for your LAN...say for example..192.168.10.10..and your LAN range will be 192.168.10.xxx. Give it a SNM of 255.255.255.0 You don't need to worry about DNS or WINS or gateway yet..if you already ran DCPromo..upon reboot you'll have errors in event viewer related to DNS...you can disregard those for now.

    Take your WAN connection...leave the top to obtain auto, but fill in your DNS server to be your internal NICs IP..in this example, 192.168.10.10.

    Now...in your network properties...go to your WAN connection. Unbind your networking services from it (remove checkmarks in boxes for server and workstation service). You do not want network services running on your external NIC.....you only want TCP/IP.

    Provider order...under network components...Advanced drop down menu, Advanced settings selection..double check your bindings....you want your internal NIC first..at the top of the list. Should see it match in provider order. What this does..is during bootup..the OS and services will attach to the top NIC first.

    Once that's set..you can run the RRAS wizard. Under Administrative tools. Run through it...select "NAT" as your checkbox option. Select which NIC is which (internal, external). Towards the end you'll see an option to fire up the Windows firewall on the external NIC..which naturally you'll want. It's similar to the WinXP sp2 firewall.

    Upon reboot...check things. Look at event log. If you ran DCPromo before..may have to go fiddle with DNS. If you're run RRAS a few times before, or changes IPs in the past a few times..you may have to fiddle with your LAT. (local address table). Or run the RRAS wizard again.

    DNS setup for your server should be the same as I have in my article. The server looks at itself, even on the external NIC. Your ISPs 2x DNS servers are entered in the DNS forwarder section of your DNS properties.

    With DHCP...your workstations will all use your servers LAN IP as their DNS and gateway.

    Since this is for your home just to dork around with and learn...I'll skip the "Don't run a web server on your DC" speech. If this was for a business..I'd say "Never do that". Read into IIS lockdown...that's my only advice..I don't really play with IIS or webpages/sites at all. I will caution you about your TOS with your ISP....port stuff may be against their rules, or even filtered out.

    Other precautions....have a good Administrator password....never ever leave the Administrator password <blank>...even on workstations.

    All your windows updates of course

    A good server rated antivirus package
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
    Guinness for Strength!!!

  6. #6
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Another note...a good habit to get into...

    Early on I built networks conforming to the usual default router IP ranges..192.168.1.xxx being the common one.

    But more and more these days, people VPN in from home, or on the road. You can't VPN from networks with the same internal IP ranges..you need different IP ranges.
    Can't to a home network behind a default Linksys router of 192.168.1.xxx to the office network that's also on 192.168.1.xxx.

    So if the office network is already setup..you end up changing the remote users.

    You can do 192.168.0.xxx to 192.168.1.xxx, or 10.0.0.xxx to 192.168.1.xxx, etc.

    So...in setting up networks now, in offices, I change it to something like 196.168.10.xxx right off the bat...that way I don't have to deal with changing home users.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
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  7. #7
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    Question help?

    reposted as a new thread, sorry
    Last edited by E_Blow; 09-30-06 at 06:02 PM.

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