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Thread: Who's Laughing Now? The Day of the Diesel is Here. Plus Ford Five Hundred Drive.

  1. #1
    R.I.P. 2015-05-13 minir's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Who's Laughing Now? The Day of the Diesel is Here. Plus Ford Five Hundred Drive.

    Hi to All

    Interesting Article on Diesel Sales in the UK. Though such things as Taxes on Sales of Cars may not apply here, Yet! the balance of the Article would hold true in most cases imho.

    Thought some might be interested.

    Plus a Ford Five Hundred Drive.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    Once noisy and smelly, diesels are now so refined their ride rivals petrol cars and they can be far cheaper to run. No wonder sales are soaring, writes Andrew Frankel of The Sunday Times
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~


    We used to buy diesel cars because they were cheap and didnít cost much to run. The fact that they sounded like tractors and had smelly, sooty exhausts was a standing joke and for a long time gave them a reputation as difficult to budge as Ladaís.

    For refinement and performance, petrol was king. Until about six years ago, that is. A diesel revolution started then and itís still happening.

    So while overall car sales are expected to slide in 2005, forecasters are confident that diesel will continue to buck the trend. Indeed, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders predicts 35% of the 2.4m cars bought in Britain this year will be diesel, rising to about 40% in the next few years and settling just below the 1m mark. Six years ago, it was 14%.

    Everybody is getting in on the act. You can already choose derv versions of all the bestselling family cars, but now luxury manufacturers are slapping diesel badges on the boots of their vehicles. Lexus will soon launch its first diesel in the new IS200. Jaguar will follow with the first diesel XJ this summer and Mercedes revealed a 4 litre bi-turbo SL sports car concept at the Geneva motor show this year. If the SL goes into production it would be as fast as a Porsche 911.

    The question is, why? Clearly, as fuel prices march relentlessly towards £4 per gallon, the imperative to stretch every drop as far as it will go becomes more important. Diesel costs the same or more than unleaded yet offers big savings to the long-distance driver.

    Take Britainís bestseller, the Ford Focus, as a typical example. In 1.6 litre form its petrol engine returns 42.2mpg on the combined cycle, which may seem reasonable enough ó until you start comparing it with the 1.6 litre diesel version, which will do 58.9mpg, and if you drive gently, 70mpg should be possible. Oh, and the diesel has more power and gives stronger performance too.

    However, this is but one of many reasons to explain the sudden explosion of interest in diesel power. Another crucially significant factor is that modern technologies, such as common rail and direct injection, have transformed diesels, improving their refinement, response and power to a point unthinkable even 10 years ago. BMWís most powerful 3 litre engine offers 272bhp and is fired not by petrol but diesel. Moreover, fitted to the 535d, it will still return 35.7mpg, compared with the 29.7mpg of the less powerful, slower, petrol-powered 530i.

    Diesels can also prove cheaper to maintain. Volkswagen reckons a new Golf TDI PD will typically do 1,500 miles more than a 2.0 FSi petrol before its service-due indicator flickers on. And when a major service is due at about 40,000 miles, the diesel service is priced at £155.84 inclusive of labour, compared with £206.99 for the petrol Golf.

    Then there are emissions. Diesels produce less carbon dioxide than petrol engines and given that company car tax bills depend on such things, we shouldnít be surprised that drivers in their thousands now opt to fill from the black pump.

    Choose to run a new Audi A4 2 litre petrol and your tax bill will be assessed on 24% of its price when new; opt instead for the 1.9 TDi and youíll be assessed at 19%. To a high-rate taxpayer, thatís an annual saving of approximately £390, despite the fact that the diesel has a higher list price.

    And it gets better the higher up the food chain you go. Try the same experiment with S-class Mercedes and youíll discover that choosing an S 320CDi over an S 350 knocks the thick end of £2,000 off your tax bill. No surprise, then, that the diesel S-class outsells all petrol variants of the same model put together. What will open your eyes further is that the diesel S-class is also nicer to drive.

    Thatís probably the biggest surprise waiting for those who join the diesel revolution. Modern diesels are now so smooth and quiet they can power luxury limousines that stand or fall on their refinement levels and nobody on board would know what power source was feeding the engine. If they did twig, it would probably be because diesels provide more low-down torque than petrol engines, enabling diesels to produce a silken shove at engine speeds that are often barely above idling for petrol cars.

    So diesels use less fuel, have better response, are cheaper to run as a company car and will go further than any comparable petrol car on a tank of fuel, reducing overall journey times by cutting the number of fuel stops by up to a third. They attract lower levels of vehicle excise duty and they can be just as refined as petrol cars. In the light of this, perhaps the real question is why is anyone buying petrol cars?

    The answer is that buyers often have to pay a premium of about £1,000 for a diesel-engined version of the equivalent petrol car. So while the diesel will use less fuel, you have to work out how many thousands of miles it will take to claw back your investment, bearing in mind also that diesel costs slightly more per litre. The exception to this rule is at the luxury end of the market where diesels are sometimes cheaper than their petrol equivalents.

    Honda reckons you need to be clocking up 20,000 miles a year to make buying its £18,600 Honda CR-V i-CTDi financially worthwhile compared with the £17,200 petrol CR-V 2.0. The diesel CR-V costs more, says Honda, ďbecause the engine is more complicated and has more componentsĒ. Unlike the petrol CR-V, it also has a standard six-speed gearbox.


    Some manufacturers still keep price differentials to a minimum. The Skoda Octavia 1.6 FSI is £13,540, while the equivalent 1.9 TDI costs just £260 more and is capable of 13mpg extra. Not surprisingly, sales are tipped 70-30 in favour of diesel.
    However, in the case of smaller cars, which are inherently economical to begin with, diesel is nothing like as popular and 80% of orders for the Skoda Fabia are for petrol models.

    Life in diesel-land is not all sunshine and blue skies, then. One dark cloud has appeared on the horizon in the form of the chancellorís decision to reimpose the 3% benefit in kind company car tax surcharge levied on all diesel cars not compliant with the latest Euro IV emissions standard. This was waived for all cars that were Euro IV compliant in advance of the deadline but as all diesel cars have to conform by the end of the year, the chancellor has deemed the waiver an incentive that is no longer necessary. Expect a stampede for 2005 diesels in the last few months of the year.

    Also, some pundits have predicted that prestige brand diesels will suffer a fall in residual values as the market becomes oversupplied by diesel stock. However, according to analysis by price watchdogs at Glassís, the premiums being paid for used diesel cars over petrol-engined equivalents are still on the increase.

    Using the BMW 5-series as an example, Glassís says a two-year-old 530d (diesel) automatic will by now have lost £6,905 from its original £34,555 list price. Compare that with the £8,830 drop in value suffered by a 530i (petrol) automatic of the same age, which cost £33,305 new.

    So despite the best efforts of No 11, the expansion in dieselís popularity appears set to continue. And one thing seems sure: the days when people only bought diesels for their economy are gone for good.

    FIVE MODELS SETTING THE PACE AT THE BLACK PUMP

    BESTSELLER
    The Ford Focus TDCi ó the ubiquitous family car ó has just been overhauled, providing a range of super-frugal diesels to choose from

    CHEAPEST
    Fiatís cute Panda Multijet is a steal at just £7,895. The new 1.3 turbo diesel is cheaper than both the Renault Clio and
    CitroŽn C2

    FASTEST
    The BMW 535d will show any diesel doubters what a performance saloon can do: 0-62mph in 6.5sec and lashings of mid-range torque for overtaking too

    MOST ECONOMICAL
    There is hot competition for this title but if you want sparkling mpg performance the CitroŽn C2 1.4 HDi will squeeze 68.9mpg out of a gallon

    MOST LUXURIOUS
    Over and above the Range Rover 3.0 Td6 and Mercedes S 320 CDI, the £61,970 Audi A8 4.0 TDI long wheelbase is the most expensive diesel on the market

    ---Ford Five Hundred Article---


    Introduced as an all-new model for 2005, the Ford Five Hundred full-size sedan is already scheduled for a makeover in 2006, due to sales that haven't measured up to the numbers Ford was expecting.

    It's tough to figure out why; this is a decent vehicle and an admirable replacement for the Ford Taurus that will take its final bow shortly. Perhaps it simply had the misfortune of being released the same year as the white-hot Chrysler 300, which has the rear-wheel-drive the Five Hundred should have received.
    Or perhaps people are getting waylaid in the showroom by the awesome new Mustang. In any case, Ford's sedan certainly is deserving of a second look.

    http://www.canadiandriver.com/articl...ivehundred.htm

    --

    regards

    minir

  2. #2
    Second Most EVIL YARDofSTUF's Avatar
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    Bio Diesel is the next step, made in usa and banks is making performance setups for the trucks that can use it now!

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    R.I.P. 2015-05-13 minir's Avatar
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    Hi YARDofSTUF

    In Europe they enjoy a cleaner burning Diesel Fuel than do we presently. It is on the way though and will allow much cleaner burning than what we presently have and therefore more pollution free than Reg. Petrol

    Diesel is the future imho for the next several years at least. Its a known commodity and has a good history behind it. Its up to the N. American Mfgs to wean us off Gasoline by offering more Diesel Options in Cars & Trucks imho.

    --

    Thanks YARDofSTUF & do have a lovely day

    --

    regards

    minir

  4. #4
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    Taps toes impatiently waiting for a diesel Ranger

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    Resident Atheist Dan's Avatar
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    well,they're still noisy and stinky.

  6. #6
    R.I.P. 2015-05-13 minir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan
    well,they're still noisy and stinky.
    --

    Hi Chris & Dan


    Chris
    That is whats missing imho as well. Its this type of Truck that should be enjoying a Diesel for its millage as well as its longevity and low maintenance.

    You'd think someone at Ford, GM or Chrysler would have figured that out long ago.

    --

    Dan
    The new Diesels are so far removed from the old ones you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference inside. Outside there is still a bit of clatter, though much reduced. As to the Smell. The Fuel still smells though again in operation it is barely noticeable.

    The New Fuel makes a huge difference in the burn and emissions.

    --

    Thanks Guys & have yourselves a wonderful day.

    --

    regards

    minir

  7. #7
    Token Dial-up User De Plano's Avatar
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    As you said Minir, it would make a world of difference if we had the quality of diesel available here that is standard in Europe.

    I still laugh at the fact my dads 81 diesel Rabbit got better mileage than the high tech hybreds of today

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    R.I.P. 2015-05-13 minir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by De Plano
    As you said Minir, it would make a world of difference if we had the quality of diesel available here that is standard in Europe. I still laugh at the fact my dads 81 diesel Rabbit got better mileage than the high tech hybrids of today

    --

    Hi ya De Plano

    I believe it and still do De Plano. The numbers being given the Hybrids do not stand up in daily driving Tests that i have read.

    The Golf still out mileages them, according to what i have read.

    Also of interest i wonder what the Servicing & Repair on these Hybrids will be when they start to acquire some mileage and attendant problems. I bet it will be a real Tear Jerker when some of those Bills start to come out.

    The New Fuel they say is coming within a year here. Hopefully it will be so.

    Thanks De Plano and enjoy your night

    --

    regards

    minir

  9. #9
    Token Dial-up User De Plano's Avatar
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    I wonder about those few people who actually have to drive those hybreds on dirt roads and whole they will handle the vibration and dust.

    Considering they are probably going to be able to only be taken to a dealer, the repairs surely will be a pretty penny.

    I will do my best to have a good night, and I hope you will do the same

  10. #10
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    diesel is where its at... top gas mileage and newer motors are just as quite(sp?) as petrol motors. That is all without mentioning the torque output of a diesel. A 200hp diesel can throw upwards of 500Ft/lb of torque to the tires.. woooooo

    ∑∑∑∑



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  11. #11
    R.I.P. 2015-05-13 minir's Avatar
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    Hi De Plano & Joe

    De Plano
    I agree, it may be a very costly situation to repair these Vehicles. They are selling them at a loss to get them out there, so the real cost of Parts etc is hidden as well.

    I do believe there will be outrage at some of the Bills that are bound to happen over time.

    --

    Joe
    I concur with you as well. Torque Rules and Diesels have tons of it. Plus everything happens way down in the Rev Range. I'll no doubt buy one when next due for replacement.

    --

    Thanks Fellas and do have a terrific day

    --

    regards

    minir

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