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Thread: control panel add/remove

  1. #1
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    Unhappy control panel add/remove

    I just noticed that my add or remove window does not display all the programs on my PC or even offer the option to remove hardly any of them. Anyone know what could have happened and how to fix it?
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  2. #2
    Certified SG Addict CableDude's Avatar
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    What is not showing up?

  3. #3
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    over half my programs no longer show up, and the ones that are there no longer have the " change/remove " option
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  4. #4
    Elite Member TonyT's Avatar
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    Log on under the user account that was used when the programs got installed.
    No one has any right to force data on you
    and command you to believe it or else.
    If it is not true for you, it isn't true.

    LRH

  5. #5
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    That's not it, but thanks for trying TT. Am presently looking for the site that shows you how to use CHKDSK and such. I need for it to fix errors it finds.
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  6. #6
    SG Enthusiast The Dude's Avatar
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    From windows help.

    Chkdsk Creates and displays a status report for a disk based on the file system. Chkdsk also lists and corrects errors on the disk. Used without parameters, chkdsk displays the status of the disk in the current drive.

    Syntax
    chkdsk [volume:][[Path] FileName] [/f] [/v] [/r] [/x] [/i] [/c] [/l[:size]]

    Parameters
    volume:
    Specifies the drive letter (followed by a colon), mount point, or volume name.
    [Path] FileName
    Specifies the location and name of a file or set of files that you want chkdsk to check for fragmentation. You can use wildcard characters (that is, * and ?) to specify multiple files.
    /f
    Fixes errors on the disk. The disk must be locked. If chkdsk cannot lock the drive, a message appears that asks you if you want to check the drive the next time you restart the computer.
    /v
    Displays the name of each file in every directory as the disk is checked.
    /r
    Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information. The disk must be locked.
    /x
    Use with NTFS only. Forces the volume to dismount first, if necessary. All open handles to the drive are invalidated. /x also includes the functionality of /f.
    /i
    Use with NTFS only. Performs a less vigorous check of index entries, reducing the amount of time needed to run chkdsk.
    /c
    Use with NTFS only. Skips the checking of cycles within the folder structure, reducing the amount of time needed to run chkdsk.
    /l[:size]
    Use with NTFS only. Changes the log file size to the size you type. If you omit the size parameter, /l displays the current size.
    /?
    Displays help at the command prompt.
    Remarks
    Running chkdsk
    To run chkdsk on a fixed disk, you must be a member of the Administrators group.

    Checking a locked drive at restart
    If you want chkdsk to correct disk errors, you cannot have open files on the drive. If files are open, the following error message appears:

    Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)

    If you choose to check the drive the next time you restart the computer, chkdsk checks the drive and corrects errors automatically when you restart the computer. If the drive partition is a boot partition, chkdsk automatically restarts the computer after it checks the drive.

    Reporting disk errors
    Chkdsk examines disk space and disk use for the file allocation table (FAT) and NTFS file systems. Chkdsk provides information specific to each file system in a status report. The status report shows errors found in the file system. If you run chkdsk without the /f command-line option on an active partition, it might report spurious errors because it cannot lock the drive. You should use chkdsk occasionally on each disk to check for errors.

    Fixing disk errors
    Chkdsk corrects disk errors only if you specify the /f command-line option. Chkdsk must be able to lock the drive to correct errors. Because repairs usually change a disk's file allocation table and sometimes cause a loss of data, chkdsk sends a confirmation message similar to the following:

    10 lost allocation units found in 3 chains.

    Convert lost chains to files?

    If you press Y, Windows saves each lost chain in the root directory as a file with a name in the format Filennnn.chk. When chkdsk finishes, you can check these files to see if they contain any data you need. If you press N, Windows fixes the disk, but it does not save the contents of the lost allocation units.

    If you do not use the /f command-line option, chkdsk sends a message if a file needs to be fixed, but it does not fix any errors.

    If you use chkdsk /f on a very large disk (for example, 70 gigabytes) or a disk with a very large number of files (for example, millions of files), chkdsk might take a long time (for example, over several days) to complete. The computer is not available during this time because chkdsk does not relinquish control until it is finished.

    Checking a FAT disk
    Windows displays chkdsk status reports for a FAT disk in the following format:

    Volume Serial Number is B1AF-AFBF

    72214528 bytes total disk space

    73728 bytes in 3 hidden files

    30720 bytes in 12 directories

    11493376 bytes in 386 user files

    61440 bytes in bad sectors

    60555264 bytes available on disk

    2048 bytes in each allocation unit

    35261 total allocation units on disk

    29568 available allocation units on disk

    Checking an NTFS disk
    Windows displays chkdsk status reports for an NTFS disk in the following format:

    The type of the file system is NTFS.

    CHKDSK is verifying files...

    File verification completed.

    CHKDSK is verifying indexes...

    Index verification completed.

    CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors...

    Security descriptor verification completed.

    12372 kilobytes total disk space.

    3 kilobytes in 1 user files.

    2 kilobytes in 1 indexes.

    4217 kilobytes in use by the system.

    8150 kilobytes available on disk.

    512 bytes in each allocation unit.

    24745 total allocation units on disk.

    16301 allocation units available on disk.

    Using chkdsk with open files
    If you specify the /f command-line option, chkdsk sends an error message if there are open files on the disk. If you do not specify the /f command-line option and open files exist, chkdsk might report lost allocation units on the disk. This could happen if open files have not yet been recorded in the file allocation table. If chkdsk reports the loss of a large number of allocation units, consider repairing the disk.

    Finding physical disk errors
    Use the /r command-line option to find physical disk errors in the file system. For information about recovering physically damaged files with recover, see Related Topics.

    Reporting bad disk sectors
    Bad sectors reported by chkdsk were marked as bad when your disk was first prepared for operation. They pose no danger.

    Understanding exit codes
    The following table lists the exit codes that chkdsk reports after it has finished.

    Exit code Description
    0 No errors were found.
    1 Errors were found and fixed.
    2 Disk cleanup, such as garbage collection, was performed, or cleanup was not performed because /f was not specified.
    3 Could not check the disk, errors could not be fixed, or errors were not fixed because /f was not specified.

    The chkdsk command, with different parameters, is available from the Recovery Console.
    Examples
    If you want to check the disk in drive D and have Windows fix errors, type:

    chkdsk d: /f

    If it encounters errors, chkdsk pauses and displays messages. Chkdsk finishes by displaying a report that lists the status of the disk. You cannot open any files on the specified drive until chkdsk finishes.

    To check all of files on a FAT disk in the current directory for noncontiguous blocks, type:

    chkdsk *.*

    Chkdsk displays a status report, and then lists the files matching the file specification that have noncontiguous blocks.

    Formatting legend
    Format Meaning
    Italic Information that the user must supply
    Bold Elements that the user must type exactly as shown
    Ellipsis (...) Parameter that can be repeated several times in a command line
    Between brackets ([]) Optional items
    Between braces ({}); choices separated by pipe (|). Example: {even|odd} Set of choices from which the user must choose only one
    Courier font Code or program output

  7. #7
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    Thanks Dude, just what I was looking for. Let you know if it corrects my problem
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  8. #8
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    Appreciate and saved the info, but it does not solve my problem. Even trial uninstall programs do not show all my programs, something is blocking access
    logon is not the problem
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  9. #9
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    Is it possible to change to NTFS now, and without losing files.
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  10. #10
    SG Enthusiast The Dude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sag2734
    Appreciate and saved the info, but it does not solve my problem. Even trial uninstall programs do not show all my programs, something is blocking access
    logon is not the problem
    Did you run any regisrty repair or cleaning programs. Sounds like the uninstall entries have been deleted.

    If you want to uninstall an appliction that has no uninstall program and it is not listed in the Add/Remove applet of Control Panel (or that uninstall doesn't work), then just delete the directory/files. Drill down:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ and HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE

    locating the applications entry and delete them.

    Use Explorer to to remove the entries from the Start Menu in either %windir%\Profiles\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\ and/or %windir%\Profiles\YourId\Start Menu\Programs\

    If there is an entry in the Add/Remove list, edit:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall

    locate the entry and delete it. If the app has a service, edit:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services

    and scroll down till you locate it. Then delete it.

    If this app starts automatically and there is no entry in the StartUp folder(s), then use Regedt32 to edit:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows

    load REG_SZ and
    run REG_SZ

    Remove the offending value and reboot.

  11. #11
    SG Enthusiast The Dude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sag2734
    Is it possible to change to NTFS now, and without losing files.
    Yes, found this:

    Changing a volume's existing file system can be time–consuming, so choose the file system that best suits your long–term needs. If you decide to use a different file system, you must back up your data and then reformat the volume using the new file system. However, you can convert a FAT or FAT32 volume to an NTFS volume without formatting the volume, though it is still a good idea to back up your data before you convert.

    Here:How to convert FAT disks to NTFS (Technet)

  12. #12
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    Thanks I'll work on those suggestion. Might take awhile but I'll holler back when done.
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

  13. #13
    SG Enthusiast The Dude's Avatar
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    I don't think switching to NTFS will fix your missing uninstaller items. I'm not sure if that is why your switching, but IMHO NTFS is the better file system. Something else to consider is your may not end up with an optimal cluster size if you do the conversion. Here is some more info I have saved.

    Windows XP supports both FAT32 and NTFS. Since the NTFS file system has many more features and benefits than FAT32 - such as increased stability and a higher level of security - it makes much more sense to format your partitions with NTFS. When you installed the operating system, you may have opted to (or mistakenly) use FAT32. Not a huge problem, since there is a one-time conversion from FAT32 to NTFS. And you can do so without losing any of your data!

    There are two ways you can convert a volume to NTFS. One method is to use the Computer Management console. Or, you can do so from the command prompt window using the convert command. For example, if you have a volume "d" on your computer and you want to convert it to NTFS, simply open the command prompt and type the following command:

    Convert d: /fs:ntfs

    After you press Enter, you'll be asked to confirm your actions by pressing Y. Now if your drive is currently in use (prime example: you are trying to convert your system volume), you can opt to have the conversion take place the next time the computer is restarted. Just to reiterate, this is a one time conversion which means there isn't any going back from NTFS to FAT32 unless you format the volume or find a third party utility that can perform this task.

    Partitions converted to NTFS from FAT16/32 use 512b clusters while non-converted partitions use 4kb. The difference is remarkable

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The format command in Windows XP Professional now aligns FAT data clusters at the cluster size boundary. This alignment improves the conversion of FAT volumes to NTFS because the convert command can now use a variable cluster size, up to a maximum of 4KB, for converted volumes, instead of a fixed 512-byte cluster size as used in Windows 2000.

    The problem is that if the FAT volume was formatted using an operating system other than Windows XP, the cluster size of the converted volume is usually 512 bytes. However, if the FAT clusters happen to be aligned at the cluster size boundary, Windows XP Professional can use the variable cluster size for the converted volume. There has been much discussion on Windows XP forums & newsgroups about which conditions should be met to have "aligned" clusters on a non Windows XP formatted FAT disk. I have personally used the format command of Windows 98 Second Edition Edition to format hard disks on a number of occasions, and when I choose to convert to NTFS during the subsequent Windows XP installation, this resulted in a cluster size of 512 bytes.



    When 512 bytes clusters are used, this increases the likelihood of fragmentation, and will cause the Disk Defragmenter to take a significant amount of time to defragment. So, all in all, you are better off formatting a drive as an NTFS drive in the first place. Most people will complain of slow performance, only to find out that their NTFS is running with 512 bytes clusters!

    If you have already converted your file system to NTFS, and you notice that you are running with 512 byte clusters, you have to reformat. If you have lots of data and/or installed progrems, make a full system backup. You'll need a 2nd hard drive, or use another (networked) PC's storage. Then reinstall Windows XP (boot from the XP-CD - more info here), and restore the backup (you should make a full system backup anyway before doing the conversion. There's always a minimal chance of corruption or data loss. Don't say I didn't warn you!).
    I hope this helps,

  14. #14
    Regular Member Sag2734's Avatar
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    Yes, I think I will save the file change till I get a new PC. Still working on the uninstaller problem. Presently using JV16 Power Tools to go through registry and eliminate progs, slow work and I have to work 12hrs for the next 4 days, but I'll holler back. Appreciate all the info. Only thing I can remember doing prior to noticing "add or remove's" dysfunction was downloading the latest security update from microsoft and looking at GoToMyPC and then nixing it. I'm hoping some where down the line I'll discover whats preventing add or remove from reading my programs, and somehow reassociate them. I remain open to suggestion!
    When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge. - Albert Einstein -

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