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Thread: Ultraband update

  1. #1
    dannjr
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    Thanks Steve
    I love hearing about it. I just like everyone else here, would love to have it...

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  2. #2
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    dannjr, I've always liked all your info too. So whatever tidbits I find about Ultraband/Advent I plan on posting here, just like I have in the past. Pueblo Colorado should be their second rollout, they are working on Kansas City right now. I'm going to be beta testing for them.

  3. #3
    JL Sparks
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    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by steve:
    dannjr, I've always liked all your info too. So whatever tidbits I find about Ultraband/Advent I plan on posting here, just like I have in the past. Pueblo Colorado should be their second rollout, they are working on Kansas City right now. I'm going to be beta testing for them. </font>
    Thanks for the update steve. I contacted Ultraband last month, after your posts about their rollout in Pueblo. They have no plans to rollout into the Denver-metro market that they shared with me, but it will be interesting to see how Pueblo goes.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    the_mp3_refuge
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    Cool

    Steve as alway I thank you for trying to bring Ultraband in CO cuz if its pueblo it will sonner or later(pref. sooner lol) get to douglas county so I'll be able to enjoy speeds higher then 5.6k(finnaly got that fast with my new athlon). Keep us informad my fellow coloradoian

  5. #5
    DraXiMuS
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    how much is it?? and does it work in seattle?

  6. #6
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    Due to bundling (telephony, high speed broadband access, and high definition quality video streams), supposedly the pricing will be 10 to 20 percent cheaper than what we have now with @Home and similar ISP's. The pricing will be dependent on how many of the services you want, such as long distance telephone service, video on demand, internet access, etc). Can't beat that for something about 8 times faster than the fastest cable modem now.

    mp3refuge, don't forget that you have Sprint wireless access up there in douglas county, probably! Right off Eldorado Mountain up in Boulder! I have a friend who just hooked up in Colorado Springs (the transmitter there is atop Cheyenne Mountain). He's getting verified d/l speeds well over 3 megabits, not too bad, his uploads suck though, I think they were about 67 kpbs.

  7. #7
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    Post Ultraband update

    As some of you know, I'm working in the background here, to try and bring Ultraband to Pueblo, Colorado, in conjunction with Utilicorp.

    Here's an interesting article I was just made privy to:

    *Beyond DOCSIS -- Advent Networks Targets Next-Generation Cable Operators
    tele.com - 01/08/2001
    By Kate Maddox



    So many last-mile issues; so hard to network around them. Every broadband technology designed to bring high-speed Internet access to residential and small business customers seems to have its problems. If it's not the distance and deployment limitations that digital subscriber line (DSL) faces, it's the shared bandwidth constraints of cable infrastructure, or the geographic and atmospheric barriers confronting wireless. Advent Networks Inc. (Austin, Texas) is trying to attack the broadband conundrum from a different angle. The startup is betting on a new type of dedicated high-speed Internet architecture that will let new cable players overcome the limitations of cable modems and deliver fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) speeds without FTTH costs. In development for just over a year, Advent's proprietary new broadband cable platform will face field tests early this year.

    If it works, the company's "Ultraband" platform-an all-digital switched Ethernet scheme-is designed to deliver a dedicated Internet protocol (IP) channel capable of carrying up to 40 Mbit/s to individual residences over existing hybrid fiber/passive coax (HFPC) cable lines. The result is a veritable virtual private network (VPN) for the consumer or small business.

    With pent-up demand for broadband connections, the market is ripe for another alternative to cable modem and DSL services. This year, only 11 percent of residential PCs will have broadband connections, according to Insight Research Corp. (Parsippany, N.J.). That number could reach 22 percent by 2003 and 40 percent by 2005. Advent's platform represents a big departure from legacy-based systems, says Adam Guglielmo, DSL analyst at TeleChoice Inc. "The ability to offer the type of bandwidth that Advent's product enables is a pretty huge jump," he says.

    Advent is positioning itself to help new cable operators deliver next-generation cable services like streaming video to the side of the house. The Ultraband architecture includes installing an Ultraband Modem Termination System a box similar to a cable modem-at the cable headend and a fast Ethernet port called the Ultraband Customer Premise Modem at the customer's premises. Ultraband is designed to plug directly into home devices like a PC and TV, as well as network peripherals, through an Ethernet jack.

    With the video and audio demands that will hit broadband providers in the next few years, Advent believes cable modem technology based on the 1996 Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS) standard won't be able to carry the load. But the jump to FTTH is costly, with buildouts estimated at between $3,000 and $7,000 per home. "We're betting on something beyond DOCSIS, but before fiber to the home," says Advent president and CEO Geoffrey Tudor, who estimates Ultraband will cost network operators about $1,000 per home for the customer premises and network edge equipment.

    Ultraband is designed to essentially provide cable operators with the ability to offer customers "network VCR" services, which means they could stream video content from the headend location or send it to hard drives located in set-top boxes. Ultraband could give operators enough bandwidth to send high-definition television (HDTV) signals to two televisions in a residence or provide video and IP telephony at the same time. "We wanted to develop a different architecture to deliver massive amounts of bandwidth but make it affordable for network operators," Tudor says.

    In creating the concept for Ultraband, Tudor was looking for a new last-mile solution to deliver high-speed bandwidth all the way to the home over existing cable infrastructure. He teamed up with Advent cofounder and chief technology officer David Pangrac, the man who revolutionized the cable industry by designing the hybrid fiber/coax (HFC) architecture in the late 1980s when he was at American Television and Communications (now Time Warner Cable). Still, specifics on how Ultraband will deliver that much bandwidth remain sketchy.

    Advent's original business plan was to sell the proprietary Ultraband platform to cable overbuilders-companies that win a second franchise to compete with the existing cable operator-as well as companies building new networks, particularly those that weren't committed to DOCSIS standards. Targeting operators designing new networks with between 150 and 200 homes per node rather than the traditional 500 homes per node is ideal, according to Pangrac, because "there are no legacy issues with new networks."

    Advent last month announced a $22.6 million second round of financing that will fund the Ultraband rollout. The major investor was electric utility UtiliCorp United (Kansas City, Mo.). The company's unregulated subsidiary, UtiliCorp Communications Services will become Advent's first beta test customer and deploy the Ultraband platform on its network in the first quarter of this year. The trial will include delivering bundles of communications services including digital video, video on demand, voice, high-speed data and other services to customers in a suburb of Kansas City. "This is a revolutionary service. It's going to allow us to invert the bandwidth model," says Ken Johnson, UtiliCorp vice president of technology services.

    The system will give UtiliCorp the capability to offer new services to customers with none of the headaches of maintaining legacy systems, Johnson says. "Everybody else is building boxes that correspond to the DOCSIS standard. When you start moving the data rate beyond 1 Mbit/s up to 40 Mbit/s, you need a different technology. Nobody is making that box yet," Tudor says. UtiliCorp hopes to provide broadband services to an estimated 760,000 homes in Kansas City alone. If it works, UtiliCorp plans to offer high-speed telecom services in other mid-America cities where it is building out its network, including Minneapolis, Grand Rapids, Mich., and Tulsa, Okla.

    UtiliCorp already has some experience in the broadband delivery business. It's been offering video, high-speed data and telephony services to customers in Kearney, Mo., just north of Kansas City, over very high data rate DSL (VDSL). "It's very high speed, but very difficult to deliver on the existing infrastructure," says Johnson, pointing to the condition of the local loop that needs to be constantly maintained, the number of taps and amplifiers in the lines, and other system constraints.

    If Advent's beta tests with UtiliCorp and another unnamed service provider go according to plan, AT&T, America Online Inc. (AOL, Dulles, Va.) and Time Warner Inc. (New York) will have more residential competition for high-speed cable services than they expected. Tudor says the company will test Ultraband with several thousand homes this year, rolling out to more than 2.2 million homes by 2004.

    Although it's a proprietary solution, Ultraband can be deployed next to DOCSIS-based infrastructure as a next-generation technology to enable multiple tiers of services, including voice, Internet access and video on demand, Tudor says. Advent also may be interested in opening its technology to research consortium Cable Television Laboratories Inc. (CableLabs, Louisville, Colo.), which now administers the DOCSIS standard, Tudor says.

    Despite the clamor for new high-speed services, it may be some time before supply can meet this demand. "There aren't that many people providing those kinds of services yet," says TeleChoice's Guglielmo. But with legacy cable infrastructure dominated by only a few players and DSL providers facing increasing financial and deployment challenges, this new option may be coming down to the last mile.

    Hope you guys enjoyed the article, those who made it this far!

    Ultraband will rock, I can't wait. Especially after having to deal with @Home the past 2 years.

  8. #8
    Chromzy
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    Thanks for the GREAT info STEVE. It was a very interesting article and leaves me *drooling*. I just hope that a CANADIAN company will look to this as an alternative to our local CABLE companies who are providing CRAPPY service to us now. It sure would be good if MISTER TED ROGERS picks this up, he's our cable giant here with LOTS of money .

    if anyone else has any links to related information on this technology I would be more than greatfull if you can post the link.

    Regards,
    Chromzy

  9. #9
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    Here's a link to Advent Networks web site, the info there is pretty sparse though.

    www.ultraband.com

  10. #10
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    My PC Magazine just arrived, and they have a huge Broadband report, quite informative.

    On page 161, in a section entitled Light Speed Ahead, you will find a brief write up about Advent Networks Ultraband Technology.

    The other information in the broadband report is eye opening, to say the least. Most of it should be available online at the following link:

    www.pcmag.com/broadband

    Enjoy!

  11. #11
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    My apologies - the PC Mag link isn't working. Just sent them an email about it, it could be that it hasn't been put up on the web site yet.

  12. #12
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    Wink

    Take a look on Advent Networks page -

    www.ultraband.com

    & check out some of their partners & investors. It's a pretty heavy duty group with lots of right of way access and major cash.

    :-))

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