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Thread: network lags need help connecting 85 units

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Feb 2004
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    network lags need help connecting 85 units

    hello,

    i have a cafe with 85 units, i have 5 10/100 switch in a daisy chain configuration (old style ) i know its not good, so i change my setup to a segment type setup, i use a 3com 8port office connect to make a segment but i just found out that the office connect cant handle all the traffic in the network my network wud crash if all units are use (some with lan games, online games and surfing) what i want to ask is that im planning to change the 3com 8port office connect with a 3com baseline 8port gigabit switch coz it has 48Gbps switching capacity and 8000 mac add compared to the 1.6Gbps and 2000 mac add office connect, wud this new baseline swicth handle the traffic? i know im not using the switch as 1000mbps coz all of my other switch is only 10/100mbps, i need a stable backbone switch to handle the segment to 5 other swicthes, ive uploaded a pic hope u guys can help me coz im really having probles with the setup, and the daisy chain is also not a good setup
    this is the plan setup need help if the 8port 3com gigabit switch wud do the trick thanks a lot in advance
    http://www.pbase.com/image/26075538

  2. #2
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    Could help if all your other switches have GBit uplinks.

    Otherwise, I'd just buy something a little nicer than 3com that runs 10/100 - with a bigger backplane.

    Have you performed any benchmarking to determine what your actual bandwidth requirements are? Do you segment by location or by function?

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  3. #3
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    i segment by location coz all 85 units function are the same, i thinks a bigger switching capacity (backplane) switch wud help, i guess, the baseline 8port gigabit switch has 48Gbps backplane i thinks its enough to handle

  4. #4
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    What is your internet feed to the LAN?
    Generally strive for the "pyramid scheme" with switches...have the highest capacity switch up top, with heaviest use machines (IE Servers), and internet feed, plugged into it.
    Uplink each additional switch to it also.

    Instead of having one continuous chain of uplinked switches.

    I'm not sure I would jump into getting higher backplane switches yet...if there's nothing that can really use that bandwidth.

    Do your current switches have uplink modules or GBICs to each other? Or are you just using a patch cable to uplink each switch at 100 base?
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  5. #5
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    isolate

    Since most of your traffic is straight through to and from the internet, and there isn't that much intranet traffic, the bottleneck should be the router (ISP connection). I am assuming that when you say that "the network crashes" that it is locking up the switches. This should be one of two problems.
    Your router simply can't handle the traffic, requests are timing out, packets are being dropped and the error rates snowball until the whole network halts. The only way to treat this is by upgrading your Router and Internet connection, or by tweaking your network.
    The other is either a malfunctioning switch or NIC causing a broadcast storm. Even though the switch isolates collision domains the extra traffic on the backplane doesn't help. If you have more than one malfunctioning NIC or port there lies the problem. There are a lot of ways to isolate this. Your best bet is using a protocol or traffic analyzer, or you can segment the switches to a backbone switch and pay attention to the link/error lights (this is less precise, but it works).
    Throwing bandwidth at this will most definitely yield results, but if you have a functioning 10/100 network backbone (including certified CAT5e drops) it should be more than adequate. Have someone come in with a Fluke network analyzer and he should isolate the problem within 1 hour.

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