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Thread: Overclocking your video card

  1. #1
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Overclocking your video card and computer

    *This is geared toward Radeons because that's what I'm using now. Allot of it applies to other cards as well*

    There is no one size fits all in OC'ing. The best thing to do is clean install the latest drivers for your card. I use Driver cleaner 2 myself:
    Drive cleaner
    Next grab a tweak utility for your card.
    RadClocker. The best one in my opinion

    ATITOOL
    This is a great utility as well. It's now included in the new Omega drivers.

    After you choose the program that you want to use you can start clocking your card. As always start increasing the frequency by 5-What your looking for is artifacts. These are caused by excessive heat or errors during rendering. They appear as white dots (usually core) or dark streaks (mostly Ram). If your OC seems stable move on to some real world testing...Games.
    Remember as you increase the frequency of the core and Ram you also increase the heat they generate. This is where third party heat sinks, Articsilver 5 and water blocks are helpful. There are a few people who use phase change cooling as well as Ln2. This is mostly for benching as the later usually kills your card.
    If you still aren't happy with your OC you could modify the hardware on the card itself. There are Vmods for memory and the GPU. These usually require you to solder potentiometers on to your card so you can apply more current where needed. You can search for these online to get more info on this. A great site that often researchs these matters is:

    http://xtremesystems.org/


    Hopefully more people will build on this thread with some more insight and it gets stuck. Next we should do one on over clocking your system. Good luck and happy clocking.
    -Some people start with the core than move on to the Ram as it usually provides the most noticeable difference. Other's see increasing the Ram as having the biggest impact. Adjusting both at the same time is safe. Or you can also "cheat" by seeing what most people are getting on your card. Set it under the average and adjust it until you find your max.
    Now you need to test for initial stability. That's where synthetic benchmarks come into play.

    Humus
    (The water demo in particular is very useful).

    ATI Demos

    Rendering With Natural Light

    rthdribl
    (The pickiest for your core OC).

    Than there's Future mark2003, 2001 and Aqua mark, (you can google for those).
    What your looking for is artifacts. These are caused by excessive heat or errors during rendering. They appear as white dots (usually core) or dark streaks (mostly Ram). If your OC seems stable move on to some real world testing...Games.
    Remember as you increase the frequency of the core and Ram you also increase the heat they generate. This is where third party heat sinks, Articsilver 5 and water blocks are helpful. There are a few people who use phase change cooling as well as Ln2. This is mostly for benching as the later usually kills your card.
    If you still aren't happy with your OC you could modify the hardware on the card itself. There are Vmods for memory and the GPU. These usually require you to solder potentiometers on to your card so you can apply more current where needed. This link is a good example:
    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums...&threadid=21142

    Hopefully more people will build on this thread with some more insight and it gets stuck. Next we should do one on over clocking your system. Good luck and happy clocking.

    *Added*
    Great article on Vsync, TAA ans tripple buffering from a great new site
    http://www.teamradeon.com/articles/g...sync_guide.asp

    **Regarding drivers**
    Official Cats: The base driver used by every third party remix. Sometimes these are faster but may have certain issues that the moders are able to address Obviously they always come out first and are 100% supported by ATI.

    Omega drivers: These are optomised by Omega for better IQ in games, somtimes at the slight cost of performance. There are releases that are actually faster than the official Cats. What makes these drivers stand out is that ATI works very closely with Omega, who is a member of their beta program, and have supported his drivers publicly. Allot of times these tend to be more stable because Omega is able to remedy certain compatiability issues, wich may wind up in future official Cats. Like most third party drivers these are budeled with utilities such as Radlinker, MultiRes adn AtiTool.
    Other notable features in this set are Softmods and an alternate OGL driver for older games such as CS.

    UniAN drivers: These are the result of a partnership between Luciferl, creator of the Neutral Catalyst, and Asura, creator of the Asura Catalyst. These have great IQ and are generaly pretty fast. They have a very creative installer and come with softmod, and Ati tray tool options. I recently started using these and I am still impressed by how well they work. If I have a stability issue with them I usually revert to Omega's set. Sometimes one of these sets will be optomised for a certain game. This is also a diciding factor.

    There are other sets of third party drivers as well. I'm not going to get into describing these because I am not a fan of them at all personaly. The top three drivers I listed above are all you really need IMO. I will say the worst set I've used is DNA dirvers. I refuse to put these on my system because they wreaked havoc on it once before.
    The difference between drivers varies between your personal taste, needs and how sensitive you are to subtle changes in IQ. Some people may not to see a difference while others swear by certain sets. You'd have to judge for yourself as to which you prefer. One key thing is to install them properly. I use driver cleaner myself as instructed in it's readme. After that I reinstall my monitor drivers than set it up to taste. There are actually times where reinstalling your chipset or the video driver will clear up issues such as poor performance. Other troubleshooting methods are through out this thread and these boards, (search is your friend).
    Last edited by Cypher; 08-23-04 at 09:34 AM.

  2. #2
    SG Enthusiast Jstyr's Avatar
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    Good stuff Cypher, how effective are RAM heatsinks in your opinion?
    spec-
    Rig #1- AMD XP 2400+, A-Bit KR7A/266, Gainward Geforce3 ti200 64mb Golden Sample, 1GB Crucial DDR, 40 gig WD HDD (7200), XP PRO, Vantec Stealth 420 PSU, Soundblaster Live 5.1
    Rig #2- P4 2.4c, Abit IC7 800 FSB /w onboard sound, Radeon 9700 Pro 128, 1 Gig Corsair 3200 XMS, Dual (SATA) 36GB WD Raptor's in RAID 0, XP Pro, Antec Truepower 400
    Rig #3-AMD Barton 2500+, Albatron KX600 (via), 1 gig Corsair 3200, Radeon 9600 Pro 128, Seagate 80 gig HD, Antec Truepower 400

  3. #3
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Thanks. They help allot if you use them with active cooling. Expect a 20-30 MHz gain from them. Just don't affix them with thermal tape. Artic alumina works great and it's non conductive.

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    Extreme Overclocker extreme's Avatar
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    This should be a sticky.

  5. #5
    SG Enthusiast TrevGlas's Avatar
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    Cypher what about AS5 on the Radeon's RAM? What heatsinky would you recommend? I'm looking to upgrade my p4 HSF, and my radeon HSF.
    Asus p4p800 Deluxe Mobo - Pentium 4 3.2 @ 3.6 - Thermaltake Spark7 HSF - Geil Golden Dragon PC3200 - ATI Radeon x850 XT PE 256mb - Maxtor 120 GB 8mb cache - Sound Blaster Live! 5.1 - Altec Lansing 5.1 Sattelites w/sub - Cooler Master Cavalier 3 case

  6. #6
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Thanks Extreme. Yeah we need a sticky on clocking cards and rigs here. Perhaps "Don" Philip or one of the mods will bless it. I meant to say Artic alumina thermal epoxy. You can mix a little AS5/3 with it to make removal easier if you should need to return the card. As for air cooling Thermalright has my vote. Although Swiftech builds a mean HS too. Fan wise I like Panaflos for procs. The Delta tornado's are too loud for my taste. They do move some air, but at the cost of turning your rig into a wind tunnel.
    It seems that allot of people have had good results with the ZM80C with the ZM-OP1 and good air flow. Linkage
    Another option is to drill and tap an old CPU HS so you can mount it on your card. Depending on the weight you may need to build some sort of bracket to prevent the card from warping. Than again you could always water cool it.

  7. #7
    SG Enthusiast TrevGlas's Avatar
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    Wow that Zalman is a monster! I wonder how much the whole thing weighs.
    Asus p4p800 Deluxe Mobo - Pentium 4 3.2 @ 3.6 - Thermaltake Spark7 HSF - Geil Golden Dragon PC3200 - ATI Radeon x850 XT PE 256mb - Maxtor 120 GB 8mb cache - Sound Blaster Live! 5.1 - Altec Lansing 5.1 Sattelites w/sub - Cooler Master Cavalier 3 case

  8. #8
    Second Most EVIL YARDofSTUF's Avatar
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    I have a Ti4200 with a 3000+ All copper sink on it, just used teh epoxy, worked well.

  9. #9
    Extreme Overclocker extreme's Avatar
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    Also, you can fit a slk-800 on most cards.

  10. #10
    Second Most EVIL YARDofSTUF's Avatar
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    Its a good idea to OC without ramsinks at first for BGA memory, then add them later if you fell you will gain from it.

  11. #11
    Extreme Overclocker extreme's Avatar
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    Originally posted by YARDofSTUF
    Its a good idea to OC without ramsinks at first for BGA memory, then add them later if you fell you will gain from it.


    Good advice.

  12. #12
    Second Most EVIL YARDofSTUF's Avatar
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    Oh and for cooling the gpu. the heatsink sits on the chip, which is pointing down, so if your can rig something up to cool it from the top as well, you can drop the temps real quick. Unfortunately this is hard to do with the little things that stick up from the card.

    You would need somethign that conducts heat well, but that does nto conduct electricity.

  13. #13
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Yeah cooling the opposite side of the GPU does help. Just watch out for the SMT parts like YoS was saying. Rigging a fan to blow on it is an option. As for NV cards, I used a TT copper HS. Stock is 300/650 and I was able to get 320/720 on air. Adding a fan on the side panel was crucial for that.

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    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Here's a link to Omega drivers for ATI. These are pre-tweaked and seem to have less issues than the ATI ones they are based on. They are designed to give you better IQ in games. I'm not saying that you should'nt use the ATI ones. If they give you problems you can try these out.
    As for tweak utilities RadLinker is by far the best one out there IMO. I say this because it does not run a background service or bloat the registry like Rage3D and Powerstrip. It's straight and to the point without all the baggage to bog you down. You can create custom profiles when you launch certain games by creating a rad link. It also give you an interface to change certain settings in DX and OGL.

  16. #16
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Come on people!
    This thread is to help answer questions that get asked allot. The title may imply it's video card specific but we can change that. So please add some of your tips on OC'ing.
    We can build off if it and use it as a reference point for those with questions we've found answers to. As a plus it saves bandwidth in the long run.

  17. #17
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMPLIFRIER
    found this at directron.com

    Understanding System Memory and CPU speeds: A layman's guide to the Front Side Bus (FSB)
    by Lee Penrod

    The following advice is based on years of experience. It is provided as a free service to our customers and visitors. However, Directron.com is not responsible for any damage as a result of following any of this advice. You are welcome to distribute these tips free to your friends and associates as long as it is not for commercial purposes.


    Introduction
    What's a bus?
    Bus Types
    The System Clock
    Why Isn't My Processor the Right Speed?
    Double Pumping, Quad Pumping, and DDR
    Double Pumping and DDR
    Quad Pumping, the P4, and Rambus
    Dual Channel Technology
    The System Clock, the Front Side Bus, and Overclocking
    What is Underclocking?
    What is Overclocking?
    Summary and Conclusion


    Introduction
    Shopping for a new processor and motherboard can be confusing. Some of the most important terms and concepts regarding system performance are also the hardest to understand. Terms like: System Clock, Quad Pumping, Double Pumping, DDR, FSB, SDRAM, Dual Channel, and QDR make many new builders cringe. In this article I will walk you through some of these important concepts so that you can make a more informed decision when upgrading your current system or building a new one.




    Part One: What's a bus
    To get anything done with a computer you have to get the information you input to the CPU and then to any attached devices such as cards, displays, and other output devices. Inside the computer itself, this information travels in the form of signals over what is known as a bus. You can think of a bus as a road and the signals as cars. A wide road (bus) can support more cars (signals), and a smaller road (bus) supports less. The cars (signals) on the road (bus) have a speed limit (the bus speed). Although a speed limit can be broken (an overclocked bus) doing so can have adverse effects on the cars (signals).

    Going along with this analogy: A computer is like a small city. You do not have just one road, but instead you have several different roads with different names and speeds.

    There are three main buses in most computers:

    PCI Bus- The PCI bus connects your expansion cards and drives to your processor and other sub systems. On most systems the bus speed of the PCI bus is 33MHz. If you go higher than that, then cards, drives, and other devices can have problems. The exception to this is found in servers. In some servers you have a special 64-bit (extra wide) 66MHz PCI slots that can accept special high-speed cards. Think of this as a double sized passing lane on a major road that allows higher cars to go through.

    2) AGP Bus- The AGP bus connects your video card directly to your memory and processor. It is very high speed compared to standard PCI and has a standard speed of 66MHz. Only one device can be hooked to the AGP bus as it only supports one video card so the speed is better compared to the PCI bus, which has many devices on it at once.

    3) Front Side Bus (FSB) - The Front Side Bus is the most important bus to consider when you are talking about the performance of a computer. The FSB connects the processor (CPU) in your computer to the system memory. The faster the FSB is, the faster you can get data to your processor. The faster you get data to the processor, the faster your processor can do work on it. The speed of the front side bus depends on the processor and motherboard chipset you are using as well as the system clock. Read on for more information about the Front Side Bus later in this article.



    Part Two: The System Clock
    The system clock is the actual speed of your FSB with out any enhancements (such as double pumping, or quad pumping) on it. The system clock is also sometimes just called the bus speed. From the system clock your PCI bus speed is determined via the use of a divider and then your AGP bus speed is determined by multiplying the PCI bus speed by 2. The dividers allow you to have a faster speed on your PCI and AGP bus while still allowing for the faster operation of the main FSB. In most systems PCI dividers are set automatically and you can not alter them, however, in newer motherboards geared towards computer enthusiasts -- PCI dividers can sometimes be manually set in order to allow you to raise the System clock higher then its normal rate. The three most common dividers built in to motherboards are: 1/5 (used on a 166MHz system clock), 1/4 (used on a 133MHz system clock), and 1/3 used on a 100MHz system clock. A 1/6 divider is sometimes available for overclocking and future support.

    Example: If you have a 166MHz system clock and you set a 1/5 divider in your motherboard's bios then your PCI bus speed would be 166/5 = ~33MHz and your AGP bus speed would be ~33*2 = 66MHz.

    Why Isn't My Processor the Right Speed?

    An often-misunderstood property of the system clock is its effect on processor speed. You see, a thing called a "CPU Multiplier" determines the speed of a processor in MHz. If you take the multiplier of the processor and multiply it by the system clock speed you get the speed of your processor. Your CPU has its multiplier hard wired in to the chip, and this *normally* cannot be changed. Your system clock is another matter. It can be set on your motherboard by using BIOS or a set of switches on the board itself. This is very important. Most motherboards do not automatically set the system clock for you when you install a new processor. We often get reports from new system builders saying that they received the wrong speed processor when in actuality; the new builder forgot to set the system clock to the right speed for their processor. For a list of standard system clock speeds please see part IV of this article.




    Part Three: Double Pumping, Quad Pumping, and DDR
    Earlier in this article I compared a bus to a road, and the bus speed to a speed limit. This isn't entirely correct because unlike a standard speed limit in real life you are not talking about miles per hour or kilometers per hour, you are talking about MHz or millions of clock cycles a second. A cycle is easily represented by a sine wave.



    A clock cycle is how long it takes to go from 1 to 0 (from the peek of the wave to the bottom of it). So how does that affect your system?

    Your processor and memory all can be affected by various enhancements to speed. To understand this you first must look back at the old way of doing things:



    Traditional parts with out any enhancements can only send/receive a signal once a cycle. A good example of this as far as memory is concerned is standard SDRAM such as PC133. The traditional approach has been around for a long time and it matched well to the un-enhanced buses like you find on processors such as the Intel Pentium / II / III or AMD K6 series. For these types of systems standard SDRAM made a lot of sense because the memory and the processor both were able to transmit at the same time and the bus speed could be synchronized.

    Enter the Present - The Double Pumped bus w/DDR

    As time progressed processor and memory manufacturers found ways of improving the number of access times per cycle. With the release of the AMD Athlon Processor the world saw the concept of a "Double Pumped FSB". With a double pumped bus the processor could send and receive a signal from the memory sub system twice a cycle. This was a great idea; however this meant that standard SDRAM memory no longer lined up. Standard SDRAM memory could only send/receive once a cycle. What was created is what is known as a bottleneck -- or an obstacle to maximum performance. Removing the bottleneck required a new and faster type of memory and the memory that filled this gap was DDR memory or Double Data Rate memory.



    DDR memory can transmit twice a cycle just like the double pumped bus on an Athlon processor, which means that using it with an Athlon processor creates an optimized situation just like you had before with the traditional system.

    Quad Pumping, the P4, and Rambus Memory

    When the Pentium 4 came out they introduced a new catch phrase to the market: "Quad Pumped" (also known as QDR). The Pentium 4 FSB can handle 4 signals a cycle. When the P4 was first released motherboards only supported traditional SDRAM accessing once a cycle. As you can imagine, such a combination of single access a cycle memory and a four access a cycle processor gives you a massive bottleneck and greatly reduces the potential performance of the processor. Intel was very quick to adopt the fastest memory technology available: Rambus RIMM memory. Although Rambus memory only accesses twice a cycle like DDR, Rambus memory comes in much higher speeds than DDR. The base speed of the popular Rambus memory at the time was a double pumped 400MHz (800MHz). Although the memory does not handle 4 signals a cycle it does work very well since 400MHz is also the enhanced speed of the standard P4 FSB (4 accesses a cycle x 100MHz). The fact that the memory does two cycles for every cycle that the bus helps makes up for the two signals a cycle difference. It is not as good as true QDR would be but the technology is widely available unlike QDR memory.



    Dual channel Technology

    Lets say you have a car that can hold 4 people but you've got 8 people to transport across town. What do you do? Well you could take one load of people across town, and then go back and get another load of people (a standard memory system) or if money was no object you could simply buy another car and have the other half of the people follow you across town in the other car (a Dual channel memory bus). With dual channel technology you use two memory modules at once to further enhance performance. This essentially doubles the number of signals a second you can handle and doubles your bandwidth (volume of information that can be transferred at once). Point Blank: Dual channel technology increases memory performance but it costs more money because you have to buy memory modules in pairs. Dual channel technology also costs more because the motherboard has to support it in the chipset and a chipset that supports dual channel technology costs more due to the higher complexity of the memory bus. Higher motherboard cost + higher memory cost = higher overall system cost.

    Dual channel Rambus has been around for a long time but Dual Channel DDR technology is just now hitting the scene in mass. Since DDR memory is cheaper than Rambus memory and more widely available, Dual Channel DDR should be a good option for the P4 processor but the problem is that as of this writing no consumer level chipset supporting Dual Channel DDR exists for the Pentium 4. (Dual channel DDR is widely available for the AMD Athlon XP series of processors via the nforce2 chipset by nVidia,) When Dual Channel DDR solutions emerge for the Pentium 4 they will quickly become the best price vs performance ratio on the P4 side.



    Part IV: The System Clock, the Front Side Bus, and Overclocking
    Now that you understand the performance enhancements in the FSB of a processor it is important that you understand how to figure out the processor multiplier and the proper system clock. When you go to purchase a processor you are told in the ad / description for the processor what FSB it has. To determine the proper system clock for the processor simply divide the FSB by the performance enhancer (2 for the double pumped bus on AMD Athlon XP/Thunderbird/Duron processors or 4 for the quad pumped bus on the Intel Pentium 4).

    If your processor has a ... FSB then the system clock speed should be:

    66MHz (Various Celeron and older): 66MHz clock
    100MHz (Pentium II / Pentium III / K6): 100MHz clock
    133MHz (Pentium II / Pentium III / K6): 133MHz clock
    200MHz (Athlon, Duron, Thunderbird): 100MHz clock
    266MHz (Thunderbird, XP): 133MHz clock
    333MHz (XP): 166MHz clock
    400MHz (Pentium 4): 100MHz clock
    400MHz (AMD XP): 200MHz clock
    533MHz (Pentium 4): 133MHz clock
    800MHz (Pentium 4): 200MHz clock


    Now, remember what I said about the processor multiplier earlier in this article? (Processor speed = processor multiplier x system clock)

    If you do not know the multiplier for your processor simply take the proper system clock speed for it and divide that into the rated processor speed and then round the dividend to the nearest .5. Examples: The Pentium4 3.06GHz processor has a FSB of 533MHz. Its system clock is 533 / 4 = ~133. The multiplier is 3,060 / 133 = ~23.

    The AMD Athlon XP2700+ has a main clock speed of 2.17GHz and a FSB of 333MHz. Its system clock is 333 / 2 = ~166MHz. The multiplier is 2,170 / 166 = ~13

    Underclocking and Overclocking

    Underclocking or the act of running a processor or device at under its rated speed is accomplished by simply running the device at a lower bus speed (or if possible a lower multiplier). Most underclocking is done by accident by new system builders. Most motherboards come defaulted to the lowest system clock speed that the motherboard supports. Since the system clock speed is usually not automatically set by the processor you put into the board, this means that if you put a processor with a higher bus speed than the lowest one the board supports, you are underclocking the processor.

    Example: Lets say I buy an AMD Athlon XP2400+ processor with a FSB of 266MHz. (XP2400 has a clock speed of ~2000MHz). If I do not set the system clock to 133MHz then I get the processors multiplier (15) times the default bus speed (100). This gives me the wrong processor speed (1500MHz) and the motherboard will either tell me I have a 1,500MHz thunderbird processor, or a XP1700+ processor. Changing the system clock in bios to 133 will make the motherboard detect the processor properly and give me the right processor speed.

    Overclocking or the act of running a processor or device higher then its rated speed is accomplished by increasing the system clock (or if possible the multiplier). The biggest issue with overclocking is keeping your PCI bus close to its speed limit (33MHz). Since a divider of your system clock determines your PCI bus, you not only affect your processor when you increase it, but also other parts of the system. Devices attached to the PCI bus are much less over clocking friendly then either memory or a CPU. When you overclock a processor using the system clock your processor speed is determined in the same way as one would for finding normal clock speed: processor multiplier x system clock = processor speed.

    Example: An Athlon XP1800+ (1.53GHz) processor with a FSB of 266 and its system clock overclocked to 145MHz would give you a speed of ~1.67GHz and cause the board to detect the processor as a XP2000+.



    Part V: Summary and Conclusion
    When you are choosing and installing components in a system you should now know how to properly set the system clock in order to achieve the full potential of the system. You should also now understand more about matching memory with a processor. Go with a motherboard/system that complements your CPU and provides it with memory support that well matches the FSB potential. Slower memory technologies such as PC133 SDRAM do not work well with current processors such as the Pentium 4 and Athlon XP. Although synchronizing the memory speed and the FSB speed is best it is OK to use memory that is faster then the FSB of your processor provided that the motherboard supports it.

  18. #18
    darkhorse
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    Might it be said that the intel chipset now had Dual Channel DDR and runs rather nicely

  19. #19
    Straight Pimpin Mytflyguy's Avatar
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    Great info here Cypher




    so between the ATI Tool and Radlinker .. You prefer Radlinker ?


    I started my OC last night with the ATI Tool .... It found a Max core of 420 ( ran it over night ) with my new Rev3 Arctic cooler VGA Silencer

    I started my Ram Max this morning and am going to let it run all day today ... I know it found artifacts at or around 395 , I'm thinking that around 375 will be the sweet spot ...

    I have yet to put any Ram sinks on this board yet ... Got any good suggestions on some BGA Ram sinks?
    Network Engineer for Linux/Windows/Netware servers and connectivity for remotes sites via VPN in Roanoke, VA.

  20. #20
    Murders & Executions Cypher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mytflyguy
    Great info here Cypher




    so between the ATI Tool and Radlinker .. You prefer Radlinker ?


    I started my OC last night with the ATI Tool .... It found a Max core of 420 ( ran it over night ) with my new Rev3 Arctic cooler VGA Silencer

    I started my Ram Max this morning and am going to let it run all day today ... I know it found artifacts at or around 395 , I'm thinking that around 375 will be the sweet spot ...

    I have yet to put any Ram sinks on this board yet ... Got any good suggestions on some BGA Ram sinks?
    I use both.
    I'll use ATITool to find my max the easy way, than set the clocks in the Radlinks I create for the games I play. That way I only run the OC when I need it most. Custom profile's and the lack of bloat is what I like about Radlinker.

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