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Rings890
11-09-01, 04:43 PM
I have partitioned my second H/D using the Administrative tools in Win2k. I want one of the partitions to have a differant O/S than Win2k. right now both are listed as having a Win2k on them.
I found this by going into command prompt and typing "ver".
Where can I find info on how to get a second O/S on my smaller partiton for all my games?

MagicMikey
11-09-01, 04:47 PM
Wow, that was really confusing! ;) The other OS being Windows 98/98 SE/ME? you would have to install Windows 98/98 SE/ME on C: then Windows 2000 on D: then let's say have E: for your games and program files...

I hope this is what you wanted to know.....if not SAY SO!! heheh ;)

Rings890
11-09-01, 05:05 PM
Oh man, I am realy bad at explaining these things.
I have Win2K on drive "C". I used the Administative tools to partition and format the second H/D. When I go into Command Prompt and go to the two seperate partitions and type "ver" it tells me that both the partitions on the second H/D are Windows 2000. I would like to put WinME on on of the partitons. On the partiton with WinME I would like to put my games on it because I can't play some of them on Win2K.
Better?

YeOldeStonecat
11-09-01, 05:06 PM
You have to jump through some hoops to get a consumer OS onto your computer after NT. You'll almost save time and have a more reliable system totally doing FDISK and re-formatting your hard drive, installing the consumer OS onto the second paritition (D:\Windows), then once that is fully installed and updated, from it's desktop, pop in your NT cd and run the install from there, into the first partition(C:\Winnt).

Technically you can install both to one large partition, but it can get flakey after a while.

There are a TON of articles out there, just type DUAL BOOT into your favorite search engine like Google...but here is one of my fave sites....

http://www.tweak3d.net/articles/win2kdualboot/

MagicMikey
11-09-01, 05:17 PM
If you type "ver" in any which partition in Command Prompt, it will say you're running Win2k no matter what. Ok, right now, how many parititons do you have and which ones are NTFS and which ones are FAT32?

Now I'm pretty sure you can do everything you need to do in Partition Magic without having to format your whole hard drive. Just to clear up a few things, most people who run dual-boots, or even multi-boot systems, do it like the following:

C:\ - Windows 98/98 SE/ME - FAT32 - 1.5GB
D:\ - Windows 2000/NT/XP - FAT32 or NTFS - 2.5GB
E:\ - Program Files & Games - FAT32 - xX.XxGB

It's a lot easier and much less complications this way.... ;)

syncmaster
11-09-01, 05:21 PM
Originally posted by MagicMikey
If you type "ver" in any which partition in Command Prompt, it will say you're running Win2k no matter what. Ok, right now, how many parititons do you have and which ones are NTFS and which ones are FAT32?

Now I'm pretty sure you can do everything you need to do in Partition Magic without having to format your whole hard drive. Just to clear up a few things, most people who run dual-boots, or even multi-boot systems, do it like the following:

C:\ - Windows 98/98 SE/ME - FAT32 - 1.5GB
D:\ - Windows 2000/NT/XP - FAT32 or NTFS - 2.5GB
E:\ - Program Files & Games - FAT32 - xX.XxGB

It's a lot easier and much less complications this way.... ;)

Everything looks fine to me but the E:\ - Program Files & Games its messing up my dream :)
Its ok for games , and also as software storage .

The program files must stay at the same place with the OS .

MagicMikey
11-09-01, 05:26 PM
Well, as long as everything is FAT32 you can install all your program files to a different drive... So let's say you have two freshly installed operating systems and in you're in Windows 98 right now and you want to install Adobe Photoshop 5.5, then you just point it to install in E:\Program Files and that's where it would install. Then you can into Windows 2000 and you do the exact same thing! it's better than installing it to two different locations for each OS.... ;)

EDIT: Oh, I think I understand now... we both confused because of the wording.....I don't if your Windows version is Greek but the default directory to install software applications is C:\Program Files ;)

Rings890
11-09-01, 06:02 PM
I think I may have messed up a bit here.
This is what I have it set up like.
C:/Windows 2000 Pro - Fat32 - 40GB
D:/? ? - FAT32 - 20GB
E:/ where I want WinME - FAT32 - 20GB

Am I right out to lunch??

MagicMikey
11-09-01, 06:27 PM
Yikes, well, like I said I'm pretty sure it's possible to move everything around using Partition Magic, but if you don't have that program, or anything similar to that, then the best thing for you to do is move all your important data to E: and the format C:

Then, install WinME on C: and Win2k on D:

Now, there is probably a way to do it so that WinME works on D: and Win2k on C: . I myself don't know exactly how it's done but my guess would be to edit the boot.ini file after you install WinME. You might also have to set D as the Primary partition and C: as a Logical....

syncmaster
11-09-01, 06:53 PM
Originally posted by MagicMikey
Well, as long as everything is FAT32 you can install all your program files to a different drive... So let's say you have two freshly installed operating systems and in you're in Windows 98 right now and you want to install Adobe Photoshop 5.5, then you just point it to install in E:\Program Files and that's where it would install. Then you can into Windows 2000 and you do the exact same thing! it's better than installing it to two different locations for each OS.... ;)

EDIT: Oh, I think I understand now... we both confused because of the wording.....I don't if your Windows version is Greek but the default directory to install software applications is C:\Program Files ;)

Well there is nothing to do with OS language , by the way i am using the US version in all my OS .

The software of windows 98 with the installations for win2k is well known that THEY MUST NOT GET MIXED .

The versions of software that Win2k uses is spesial for NT OS systems , and if you mix this versions in one folder , you will end up with many problems .

My way of use in my Dual boot , 98 & win2k , is that the Win98 is only a back door ,and nothing more .
Win2k is my basic OS , and all my software bungle is there .

My setup is :
C: win98
D:win2k
E:games
F:software colection storage
G: 700 megs space for burning CDs

Actualy by having double hard disks , i have all this partitions 2 times .
So i have 10 drive letters , plus CDRW - DVD - CD 13 drive letters in total .

All my friends is wondering , how i keep the control with all of those :)

MagicMikey
11-09-01, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by syncmaster

The software of windows 98 with the installations for win2k is well known that THEY MUST NOT GET MIXED .

The versions of software that Win2k uses is spesial for NT OS systems , and if you mix this versions in one folder , you will end up with many problems .


Heh, that's what I meant ;) When situations like that come up, I usually make another folder, still in E:, but you can do it any way you want!! ;)

YeOldeStonecat
11-10-01, 08:09 AM
I always install my programs in a common 3rd partition to save space...you do not need to install a program to both partitions...you can take a 3rd partition and install the program into each OS...yet pointing to the 3rd partition.

For example, my dual boot machine to the left of me...it's NT 4 Server which runs most of the time, and 98SE as the dual boot for occasional fragging on my LAN with a buddy. NT is installed to C, Win98 to D, and all my games are installed on E, such as E:\Rune, E:\Quake3, E:\Wolfenstein, etc etc. I installed them on NT to that path, rebooted into 98, and installed them in 98 to that same path...it just writes over the directory again, but installs the proper system files to each OS. The Programs files are the same, and will be happy in the same E:\ directories...but the programs system files are unique to each OS, and will be installed in the system directory of each OS.

You do not HAVE to install the program on each partition, taking up twice the HD space. Use a common partition to make one program directory that each OS will use/share.

syncmaster
11-10-01, 09:39 AM
I will add this last info ,so all the thread will end up giving one clear message .

From all the software bungle that is possible one user to own , only some programs , will not tolerate to be get mixed , with Win9X and NT files .

So to just eliminate the possibility to happen ,we do not share the Program Files folder, with two OS .

In our time , that we have from 15 GB hard drives to 40GB , we are still talking about economy in the hard drives space !!!

In praxis ,all the MS aplications , they know to share files for two OS , the only that does not like tis is the IE explorer .

I am not totaly negative in the idea of Program Files folder sharing , but just for the best compatiability and security , i will say do not do it .

YeOldeStonecat
11-10-01, 09:52 AM
You've got to see how dual boot works.

Programs, such as games, Microsoft Office, and other true applications, you can install to a neutral directory/partition (for example, E:\Microsoft Office, or E:\Quake 3. The applications files can be shared from there between the two OS's. The applications critical system files (.dll's, etc) and registry entries will naturally be installed into your %system% directory (C:\WinNT, or D:\Windows) , which is essential for each OS to know about and run the app.

Naturally, common sense would dictate that you make the shared directory a file system each OS can read..but hopefully nobody is going through the trouble of using NTFS on a home system.

IE is a not a stand alone application, it is integrated into the OS (Explorer.exe)...common sense also would say things like Anti-virus (which become part of your system, not a stand alone app) would be installed into each OS and it's partition.

I have two servers to my left here where I've built them that way, and a couple of LAN servers, and many friends machines I've built for them. I see a lot of posts of forums where people blame problems to dual booting...but I don't see those problems...not when one builds their system carefully and well thought out.

MagicMikey
11-10-01, 11:09 AM
Originally posted by YeOldeStonecat
You've got to see how dual boot works.

Programs, such as games, Microsoft Office, and other true applications, you can install to a neutral directory/partition (for example, E:\Microsoft Office, or E:\Quake 3. The applications files can be shared from there between the two OS's. The applications critical system files (.dll's, etc) and registry entries will naturally be installed into your %system% directory (C:\WinNT, or D:\Windows) , which is essential for each OS to know about and run the app.

Naturally, common sense would dictate that you make the shared directory a file system each OS can read..but hopefully nobody is going through the trouble of using NTFS on a home system.

IE is a not a stand alone application, it is integrated into the OS (Explorer.exe)...common sense also would say things like Anti-virus (which become part of your system, not a stand alone app) would be installed into each OS and it's partition.

I have two servers to my left here where I've built them that way, and a couple of LAN servers, and many friends machines I've built for them. I see a lot of posts of forums where people blame problems to dual booting...but I don't see those problems...not when one builds their system carefully and well thought out.


Ya, you know what I'm talking about! ;)