PDA

View Full Version : Re: Adding a Bridge to a Wireless Network



Jack \(MVP-Networking\).
04-25-08, 03:58 PM
Hi
Your plan should work.
If you are incline so, Lem's suggestion would be less expensive, and more
flexible with the Wireless security.
Other options, http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
Jack (MVP-Networking).

"Tony V" <TonyV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D65E488D-5F0F-4ADA-BBC4-76DDF19073CE@microsoft.com...
>I have an existing wireless network in my house.
>
> I want to have a wired connection in my workshop so that I can get an
> Internet connection for PCs that I repair for my friends and family. Most
> of
> these PCs use a wired connection so I don't want to turn them into a
> wireless
> client on my network when I'm done repairing them.
>
> I don't want to drag the repaired PC up to the router and plug it (which I
> have been doing) and I don't want to run any cable. I was thinking of
> buying
> a wireless bridge to basically make a wired connection in my workshop and
> connect it to the wireless network in the house.
>
> I was thinking about something like the Linksys WET54G or a similar
> product.
>
> Does this sound like it makes any sense??
>
> Thanks for any help.
> Tony

=?Utf-8?B?VG9ueSBW?=
04-26-08, 04:52 PM
Thanks for everyone's help.
So to recap, I need to buy a wireless bridge. I then configure it using a PC
that's physically connected to my wireless router. Then after configuring it
using the CD that comes with it, I can disconnect the wireless bridge and
take it to any part of the house and plug an Ethernet device into it (such as
a wired PC).

Correct? Or do I need two wireless bridges--one cabled to my wireless router
and one that's in a remote (my workshop) where I can plug in wired computers.

Alos, should I buy a bridge or access point? Is there any advantage for the
scenario that I have??

Thanks!
Tony


"Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

> Hi
> Your plan should work.
> If you are incline so, Lem's suggestion would be less expensive, and more
> flexible with the Wireless security.
> Other options, http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>
> "Tony V" <TonyV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:D65E488D-5F0F-4ADA-BBC4-76DDF19073CE@microsoft.com...
> >I have an existing wireless network in my house.
> >
> > I want to have a wired connection in my workshop so that I can get an
> > Internet connection for PCs that I repair for my friends and family. Most
> > of
> > these PCs use a wired connection so I don't want to turn them into a
> > wireless
> > client on my network when I'm done repairing them.
> >
> > I don't want to drag the repaired PC up to the router and plug it (which I
> > have been doing) and I don't want to run any cable. I was thinking of
> > buying
> > a wireless bridge to basically make a wired connection in my workshop and
> > connect it to the wireless network in the house.
> >
> > I was thinking about something like the Linksys WET54G or a similar
> > product.
> >
> > Does this sound like it makes any sense??
> >
> > Thanks for any help.
> > Tony
>
>

Adair Winter
04-26-08, 05:40 PM
"Tony V" <TonyV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> Thanks for everyone's help.
> So to recap, I need to buy a wireless bridge. I then configure it using a
> PC
> that's physically connected to my wireless router. Then after configuring
> it
> using the CD that comes with it, I can disconnect the wireless bridge and
> take it to any part of the house and plug an Ethernet device into it (such
> as
> a wired PC).
>
> Correct? Or do I need two wireless bridges--one cabled to my wireless
> router
> and one that's in a remote (my workshop) where I can plug in wired
> computers.
>
> Alos, should I buy a bridge or access point? Is there any advantage for
> the
> scenario that I have??
>
> Thanks!
> Tony
>

What you get depends on how much money you want to spend and how good of a
signal your wireless router has in your shop. I'd say if you get a good
signal in the shop than one of the Linksys WRT54GL routers with DD-WRT
(www.dd-wrt.com) flashed to it would be your cheapest way of making this
work.. Or even any other devices that supports a client bridge or what they
call Client AP on the EZ3+
(http://www.wisp-router.com/wri/itemDesc.asp?ic=EZ3plus%2D14)
The latter would be best if you don't have good signal out in the shop as
the 14db antenna would help in making a better connection.

Using the linksys (or similar device) has the advantage of having a built in
ethernet switch for hooking up your devices. If you use the EZ3+ you'd have
to come out of it and into another switch or connect directly to the
computer you are working on.

In any case these devices need to have an IP address in the same subnet as
your current network (e.g. 192.168.1.0/24) and be configured to connect to
your wireless network via it's SSID, security key and channel.
There are alot of good resources out there do some searching and see what
fits you and your budget.

Adair

Phillip Windell
04-28-08, 09:11 AM
"Tony V" <TonyV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:C81D7492-F234-41A1-82DC-C4C470BAB089@microsoft.com...
> Thanks for everyone's help.
> So to recap, I need to buy a wireless bridge. I then configure it using a
> PC
> that's physically connected to my wireless router. Then after configuring
> it
> using the CD that comes with it, I can disconnect the wireless bridge and
> take it to any part of the house and plug an Ethernet device into it (such
> as
> a wired PC).

Theoretically, yes.

> Correct? Or do I need two wireless bridges--one cabled to my wireless
> router
> and one that's in a remote (my workshop) where I can plug in wired
> computers.

As has become obvious by this thread,..the home-user/home-office "consumer"
grade products often package multiple functions in the same physical "box"
to make them low price for the type of buyer they are targeting.
Commercial/Industrial grade equipment tends to be one functionality per
physical device so that each device can be designed in a more dedicated
"focused" way,...which costs more. For example my pair of Tranzeo Wireless
Bridges run on a 5ghz microwave and can shoot 30 miles and will cost a whole
lot more than you are likely to spend,..yet there "ain't no way" you are
going to plug a handfull of host PCs into them without a Switch in
between,...they have no built in switch and are certainly not comparable to
a "wireless router" you'd get at Bestbuy.

So what you specifically buy will determine how many you need and how you
deploy it. The folks here have suggested several models of stuff, so you
probably have to investigate each one specifically and see what will work
best for you.

--
Phillip Windell
www.wandtv.com

The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
-----------------------------------------------------