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Phillip Windell
04-25-08, 08:46 AM
Bridges operate in pairs,...you have to buy two.
You don't add them to the wireless network,...you add them to the Wired
Network.

Host machines do not connect to Bridges directly (unless they have a built
in Switch) so you have to connect each bridge in the existing wired LAN at a
Switch, which could be the built in switch at the "router" at one end and a
standalone Switch at the "repair shop" end.

I know absolutely nothing about the WET54G specifically,...I can only speak
"generically" about the technology and the principles.

Personally I would just run an Ethernet Cable to the Shop and forget it.
You can run them up to 100 meters (300 feet),...which is about double the
distance you get with wireless devices if you want "good" wireless
performance. It is a lot cheaper than two Bridges and another Switch.

--
Phillip Windell
www.wandtv.com

The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
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"Tony V" <TonyV@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D65E488D-5F0F-4ADA-BBC4-76DDF19073CE@microsoft.com...
>I have an existing wireless network in my house.
>
> I want to have a wired connection in my workshop so that I can get an
> Internet connection for PCs that I repair for my friends and family. Most
> of
> these PCs use a wired connection so I don't want to turn them into a
> wireless
> client on my network when I'm done repairing them.
>
> I don't want to drag the repaired PC up to the router and plug it (which I
> have been doing) and I don't want to run any cable. I was thinking of
> buying
> a wireless bridge to basically make a wired connection in my workshop and
> connect it to the wireless network in the house.
>
> I was thinking about something like the Linksys WET54G or a similar
> product.
>
> Does this sound like it makes any sense??
>
> Thanks for any help.
> Tony

Chuck [MVP]
04-26-08, 08:07 PM
On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 08:46:24 -0500, "Phillip Windell" <philwindell@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Bridges operate in pairs,...you have to buy two.
>You don't add them to the wireless network,...you add them to the Wired
>Network.
>
>Host machines do not connect to Bridges directly (unless they have a built
>in Switch) so you have to connect each bridge in the existing wired LAN at a
>Switch, which could be the built in switch at the "router" at one end and a
>standalone Switch at the "repair shop" end.
>
>I know absolutely nothing about the WET54G specifically,...I can only speak
>"generically" about the technology and the principles.
>
>Personally I would just run an Ethernet Cable to the Shop and forget it.
>You can run them up to 100 meters (300 feet),...which is about double the
>distance you get with wireless devices if you want "good" wireless
>performance. It is a lot cheaper than two Bridges and another Switch.

Phillip,

If the shop is a separate building, that might not be a good idea. Google for
"ground potential difference" if you don't know what I'm discussing.
<http://networking.nitecruzr.net/2007/04/electrical-issues-in-ethernet.html>
http://networking.nitecruzr.net/2007/04/electrical-issues-in-ethernet.html

--
Cheers,
Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
http://networking.nitecruzr.net/

Phillip Windell
04-28-08, 08:56 AM
"Chuck [MVP]" <none@example.net> wrote in message
news:j9k714tor02j0gm093jv148cohku1i42uu@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 08:46:24 -0500, "Phillip Windell"
> <philwindell@hotmail.com>
> wrote:

> If the shop is a separate building, that might not be a good idea. Google
> for
> "ground potential difference" if you don't know what I'm discussing.
> <http://networking.nitecruzr.net/2007/04/electrical-issues-in-ethernet.html>
> http://networking.nitecruzr.net/2007/04/electrical-issues-in-ethernet.html

Yes, I'm aware of the potential for a "ground potential" difference between
buildings. We are an NBC affiliate TV station, we have to be careful of
that too. As far as wireless links we have two primary ones running over
7gig Microwaves,..one 15 miles, one about 35 miles. Then we have two truck
mounted mobile ones. However none of those are carrying Ethernet, but the
radio technology is the same.

We have one stationary Ethernet capable one but it is not in use right
now,..where we wanted to use it there is too much interferrence from other
systems where we have to aim it. It might have worked if we lift it another
150 feet or so to get physically above the others that are in the way but
then the additional 150 feet vertical distance becomes a problem for us,..so
we may never use it.

--
Phillip Windell
www.wandtv.com

The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
-----------------------------------------------------
Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html

Troubleshooting Client Authentication on Access Rules in ISA Server 2004
http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/1/8/918ed2d3-71d0-40ed-8e6d-fd6eeb6cfa07/ts_rules.doc

Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.mspx

Microsoft ISA Server Partners: Partner Hardware Solutions
http://www.microsoft.com/forefront/edgesecurity/partners/hardwarepartners.mspx
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