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Timothy Daniels
01-19-09, 07:58 PM
Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:

I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
a device (or devices) that can do this?

*TimDaniels*

$Bill
01-19-09, 08:31 PM
Timothy Daniels wrote:
> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> a device (or devices) that can do this?

Maybe a second wireless router/access point will do the trick to
avoid your cabling dilemma ? Might even be cheaper than trying
to run cables.

Timothy Daniels
01-19-09, 08:45 PM
"$Bill" suggested:
> Timothy Daniels wrote:
>> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>>
>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
> Maybe a second wireless router/access point will do the trick to
> avoid your cabling dilemma ? Might even be cheaper than trying
> to run cables.

What would be the topology of such a setup? That is, what would
connect to what? It sounds like you'd connect a wireless router to
the cable modem downstairs, and have that router speak to the
wireless router upstairs. Would that work? How would the IP
addresses be arranged so that the desktop upstairs could say that
it wanted to access the Internet via the modem on the downstairs
router instead of one of the devices on the upstairs router?

*TimDaniels*

1PW
01-19-09, 09:00 PM
On 01/19/2009 05:58 PM, Timothy Daniels sent:
> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
> *TimDaniels*

Hello Tim:

I don't know what your budget limitations might be for a pair of
wireless Ethernet extenders... However, what is the approximate
distance from the old to the new location?

So, despite your requirements Tim, it might /still/ be best to find a
way to run plenum rated CAT5/CAT6 cable from near the cable modem to
near the proposed new upstairs location.

Alternatively, perhaps a way can be found to extend the cable provider's
RG6 coaxial cable to the new location, therefor allowing you to bring
the cable modem to the new location too. You'd get TV service, and
maybe more, at the upstairs location as a bonus.

Last, but not least, leave the cable modem *and* WRT54GS router
downstairs and go 802.11G wireless with the desktop, laptop and printer
employing wireless USB based service using Linksys WUSB54G USB adapters
or their equivalents. Just use the best appropriate security measures
if this is undertaken.

I know this is mostly what you didn't want to read. Sorry...

Perhaps you could update this thread in the future with your progress.

Pete
--
1PW @?6A62?FEH9:DE=6o2@=]4@> [r4o7t]

$Bill
01-19-09, 09:40 PM
Timothy Daniels wrote:
>
> What would be the topology of such a setup? That is, what would
> connect to what? It sounds like you'd connect a wireless router to
> the cable modem downstairs, and have that router speak to the
> wireless router upstairs. Would that work? How would the IP
> addresses be arranged so that the desktop upstairs could say that
> it wanted to access the Internet via the modem on the downstairs
> router instead of one of the devices on the upstairs router?

I've never done it with a home router (only on UNIX systems that don't
use broadband). You should be able to make the whole setup upstairs
act like a gateway for the router downstairs, but I'd have to do a lot
of research to tell you how to configure it. Maybe a quick support
question to Linksys would get you an appropriate answer.

Timothy Daniels
01-19-09, 10:04 PM
"1PW" wrote:
> Timothy Daniels sent:
>> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>>
>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>
>> *TimDaniels*
>
> Hello Tim:
>
> I don't know what your budget limitations might be for a pair of
> wireless Ethernet extenders... However, what is the approximate
> distance from the old to the new location?
>
> So, despite your requirements Tim, it might /still/ be best to find a
> way to run plenum rated CAT5/CAT6 cable from near the cable modem to
> near the proposed new upstairs location.
>
> Alternatively, perhaps a way can be found to extend the cable provider's
> RG6 coaxial cable to the new location, therefor allowing you to bring
> the cable modem to the new location too. You'd get TV service, and
> maybe more, at the upstairs location as a bonus.
>
> Last, but not least, leave the cable modem *and* WRT54GS router
> downstairs and go 802.11G wireless with the desktop, laptop and printer
> employing wireless USB based service using Linksys WUSB54G USB adapters
> or their equivalents. Just use the best appropriate security measures
> if this is undertaken.
>
> I know this is mostly what you didn't want to read. Sorry...
>
> Perhaps you could update this thread in the future with your progress.
>
> Pete


Cat5/Cat6 cable would be only slightly easier to run because it's more
flexible and thinner than RG6QS cable, but holes would still have to be
drilled and the cable fished through the same areas. The hardware I'd
hope to buy used on Ebay - the same way I bought the Linksys wireless
router and the Ambit cable modem. (Read that "low budget"). I was
stunned when I called a local home theater installation company - which
charges $95/hour/person to do that kind of cabling, with a minimum of
$190 (2 people for one hour). Time Warner guys, who don't even know
what a Greelee flexible drill bit is, charge $20 to $30 just to come out to
give an estimate. Then there's the asbestos in the ceiling.... It really makes
me want to go wireless for the router-modem link.

*TimDaniels*

Gene S. Berkowitz
01-19-09, 10:51 PM
In article <Ho6dnZEXVsnS0OjUnZ2dnUVZ_t_inZ2d@earthlink.com>,
SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz says...
> "1PW" wrote:
> > Timothy Daniels sent:

> Cat5/Cat6 cable would be only slightly easier to run because it's more
> flexible and thinner than RG6QS cable, but holes would still have to be
> drilled and the cable fished through the same areas. The hardware I'd
> hope to buy used on Ebay - the same way I bought the Linksys wireless
> router and the Ambit cable modem. (Read that "low budget"). I was
> stunned when I called a local home theater installation company - which
> charges $95/hour/person to do that kind of cabling, with a minimum of
> $190 (2 people for one hour). Time Warner guys, who don't even know
> what a Greelee flexible drill bit is, charge $20 to $30 just to come out to
> give an estimate. Then there's the asbestos in the ceiling.... It really makes
> me want to go wireless for the router-modem link.
>
> *TimDaniels*

Try Craigslist for an electrician in your area who takes cash. Calling
a home theater company to run some coax is like calling a neurosurgeon
to clean out earwax. And have him run both coax and Cat6 to the same
wall plate. It won't cost much more, and gives you more options.

--Gene

Bill M.
01-20-09, 12:13 AM
On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 17:58:05 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
>I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
>*TimDaniels*

My $0.02

1. Leave the modem and wireless router where they are; configure the
laptop for wireless operation and (as a test) carry it upstairs to
where the equipment would likely reside. How is the signal
strength/quality?

If good, then pick up a wireless router that can run dd-wrt firmware,
(I'm partial to the Linksys WRT54GL, but the dd-wrt website lists many
supported models), which you would configure as a 'wireless client
bridge'. The wireless router downstairs would be the Access Point, and
the wireless router upstairs would be the client. The client connects
to the AP and shares the connection via its 4 LAN ports.

2. If the above is not an option, consider some flavor of power line
networking. I believe you can pick up a pair of devices for about $80.
Advantages are that the connection is still wired, no cables of any
kind have to be run, and you're not relying on wireless.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-20-09, 02:58 AM
"Bill M." wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>>I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>>via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>>to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>>to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>>The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>>terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>>just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>>the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>>a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> 1. Leave the modem and wireless router where they are; configure the
> laptop for wireless operation and (as a test) carry it upstairs to
> where the equipment would likely reside. How is the signal
> strength/quality?


The signal reaching the laptop upstairs is excellent and the speed
measured via the SpeakEasy.com website is the same as that of
the wired connection, i.e. 5.8Mbps. Wireless would provide a
solid connection from the livingroom to the bedroom directly
above.


> If good, then pick up a wireless router that can run dd-wrt firmware,
> (I'm partial to the Linksys WRT54GL, but the dd-wrt website lists
> many supported models), which you would configure as a 'wireless
> client bridge'. The wireless router downstairs would be the Access Point,
> and the wireless router upstairs would be the client. The client connects
> to the AP and shares the connection via its 4 LAN ports.


Does that mean that the only way to provide a wireless bridge
between the wireless router upstairs and the modem downstairs
is to flash a wireless router with 3rd-party firmware?
I'd be willing to do it if that were the only way and I could find
another router cheap on Ebay, but there would be a learning curve
that I may not be able to afford.


> 2. If the above is not an option, consider some flavor of power line
> networking. I believe you can pick up a pair of devices for about $80.
> Advantages are that the connection is still wired, no cables of any
> kind have to be run, and you're not relying on wireless.
>
> --
> Bill

Siemens Speedstream powerline ethernet adaptors got some good
comments. Retail price is $99, and Amazon is out of stock and there
aren't any listed on Ebay, and Nextag doesn't list them, either. Since
I'd need 2 of them, that might be too pricey a solution.
Amazon is selling a Linksys powerline ethernet bridge, but there's no
information about it on the Linksys website. I keep reading about
flakiness of Powerline products and their slow real world data rates,
and it makes wireless more attractive.

*TimDaniels*

Elmo P. Shagnasty
01-20-09, 04:33 AM
In article <Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com>,
"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> a device (or devices) that can do this?

Don't overthink this.

Simply make everything upstairs wireless--laptop, desktop, printer--all
of them.

Downstairs is the cable modem and the router. Great. But the router is
wireless only--nothing wired connects to it.

Upstairs is the laptop--connected wireless. The desktop--put a wireless
card in it. The printer--use a wireless to wired ethernet adapter (you
could use one of those for the desktop, too).

This way, each device can be ANYWHERE in the house, and not tied to a
physical location just because it has to wire into something.

Wired to wireless adapter:

http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G



Another alternative: while keeping your cable modem and router
downstairs, connect them to the house using powerline adapters:

http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/PowerLine

Imagine plugging a wire from your router into the wall outlet, then
upstairs from your wall outlet into a small hub/switch. Then plug
laptop, desktop, printer into the small hub switch.

This way you get the benefit of hard wiring from downstairs to upstairs,
without running an actual network wire. Actually, you get the benefit
of having wired network products ANYWHERE in the house.

Me, I'd just make everything wireless using the first method above. Why
complicate things.

Bill M.
01-20-09, 04:59 AM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 00:58:21 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>"Bill M." wrote:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>>I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>>>I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>>>via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>>>to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>>>to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>>>The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>>>terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>>>just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>>>the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>>>a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>>
>>>*TimDaniels*
>>
>> 1. Leave the modem and wireless router where they are; configure the
>> laptop for wireless operation and (as a test) carry it upstairs to
>> where the equipment would likely reside. How is the signal
>> strength/quality?
>
>
> The signal reaching the laptop upstairs is excellent and the speed
> measured via the SpeakEasy.com website is the same as that of
> the wired connection, i.e. 5.8Mbps. Wireless would provide a
> solid connection from the livingroom to the bedroom directly
> above.

IMHO, this is definitely the frontrunner so far. Other solutions,
including running coax, running Cat5, and Powerline, are not as
attractive now that you know the wireless signal is more than
adequate.


>> If good, then pick up a wireless router that can run dd-wrt firmware,
>> (I'm partial to the Linksys WRT54GL, but the dd-wrt website lists
>> many supported models), which you would configure as a 'wireless
>> client bridge'. The wireless router downstairs would be the Access Point,
>> and the wireless router upstairs would be the client. The client connects
>> to the AP and shares the connection via its 4 LAN ports.
>
>
> Does that mean that the only way to provide a wireless bridge
> between the wireless router upstairs and the modem downstairs
> is to flash a wireless router with 3rd-party firmware?
> I'd be willing to do it if that were the only way and I could find
> another router cheap on Ebay, but there would be a learning curve
> that I may not be able to afford.

No, flashing a wireless router isn't the only way, but it's usually
cheaper since wireless routers cost less than bridges, probably due to
economy of scale. For example, the Linksys WET54G is an actual bridge
device, but it costs $80-85 new, depending on where you shop. Compare
that to a Linksys WRT54GL, for $60-65 new. Ebay usually has lots of
used wireless routers that would be suitable, but you'll typically
find far fewer bridges for sale.


>> 2. If the above is not an option, consider some flavor of power line
>> networking. I believe you can pick up a pair of devices for about $80.
>> Advantages are that the connection is still wired, no cables of any
>> kind have to be run, and you're not relying on wireless.
>>
>> --
>> Bill
>
> Siemens Speedstream powerline ethernet adaptors got some good
> comments. Retail price is $99, and Amazon is out of stock and there
> aren't any listed on Ebay, and Nextag doesn't list them, either. Since
> I'd need 2 of them, that might be too pricey a solution.
> Amazon is selling a Linksys powerline ethernet bridge, but there's no
> information about it on the Linksys website. I keep reading about
> flakiness of Powerline products and their slow real world data rates,
> and it makes wireless more attractive.
>
>*TimDaniels*

They were talking about Powerline networking products in
alt.internet.wireless just recently. Some people have had good
results, while others had poor results. I suppose it depends on
several factors, including how much noise is on your lines. I have no
personal experience and only mentioned them for completeness.

I wouldn't be surprised if there's a step by step guide in the dd-wrt
Wiki on how to set up a router as a wireless client bridge. I'll help
you look if you're interested. I think you'll find it's a few clicks
and done. I have two WRT54GL routers running as client bridges here.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-20-09, 12:20 PM
"Bill M." wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>>I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>>>>I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>>>>via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>>>>to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>>>>to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>>>>The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>>>>terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>>>>just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>>>>the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>>>>a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>>>
>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>
>>> 1. Leave the modem and wireless router where they are; configure the
>>> laptop for wireless operation and (as a test) carry it upstairs to
>>> where the equipment would likely reside. How is the signal
>>> strength/quality?
>>
>>
>> The signal reaching the laptop upstairs is excellent and the speed
>> measured via the SpeakEasy.com website is the same as that of
>> the wired connection, i.e. 5.8Mbps. Wireless would provide a
>> solid connection from the livingroom to the bedroom directly
>> above.
>
> IMHO, this is definitely the frontrunner so far. Other solutions,
> including running coax, running Cat5, and Powerline, are not as
> attractive now that you know the wireless signal is more than
> adequate.
>
>
>>> If good, then pick up a wireless router that can run dd-wrt firmware,
>>> (I'm partial to the Linksys WRT54GL, but the dd-wrt website lists
>>> many supported models), which you would configure as a 'wireless
>>> client bridge'. The wireless router downstairs would be the Access Point,
>>> and the wireless router upstairs would be the client. The client connects
>>> to the AP and shares the connection via its 4 LAN ports.
>>
>>
>> Does that mean that the only way to provide a wireless bridge
>> between the wireless router upstairs and the modem downstairs
>> is to flash a wireless router with 3rd-party firmware?
>> I'd be willing to do it if that were the only way and I could find
>> another router cheap on Ebay, but there would be a learning curve
>> that I may not be able to afford.
>
> No, flashing a wireless router isn't the only way, but it's usually
> cheaper since wireless routers cost less than bridges, probably due to
> economy of scale. For example, the Linksys WET54G is an actual bridge
> device, but it costs $80-85 new, depending on where you shop. Compare
> that to a Linksys WRT54GL, for $60-65 new. Ebay usually has lots of
> used wireless routers that would be suitable, but you'll typically
> find far fewer bridges for sale.


I see several WET54G wireless ethernet bridges for sale on Ebay
at widely varying prices. Remembering that the router upstairs can
connect to a device wirelessly, would one or two wireless bridges
be needed to form the link between the modem downstairs and the
router upstairs?

*TimDaniels*

Timothy Daniels
01-20-09, 12:49 PM
"Elmo P. Shagnasty" advised:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
> Don't overthink this.
>
> Simply make everything upstairs wireless--laptop, desktop, printer--
> all of them.
>
> Downstairs is the cable modem and the router. Great. But the
> router is wireless only--nothing wired connects to it.
>
> Upstairs is the laptop--connected wireless. The desktop--put a
> wireless card in it. The printer--use a wireless to wired ethernet
> adapter (you could use one of those for the desktop, too).
>
> This way, each device can be ANYWHERE in the house, and
> not tied to a physical location just because it has to wire into
> something.
>
> Wired to wireless adapter:
> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G


My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.

What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?


> Another alternative: while keeping your cable modem and router
> downstairs, connect them to the house using powerline adapters:
>
> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/PowerLine
>
> Imagine plugging a wire from your router into the wall outlet, then
> upstairs from your wall outlet into a small hub/switch. Then plug
> laptop, desktop, printer into the small hub switch.
>
> This way you get the benefit of hard wiring from downstairs to
> upstairs, without running an actual network wire. Actually, you
> get the benefit of having wired network products ANYWHERE
> in the house.
>
> Me, I'd just make everything wireless using the first method above.
> Why complicate things.


Powerline ethernet adaptors might be the easiest way to go if
the upstairs wall outlets and the downstairs wall outlets are on
the same branch circuit. (I don't want to get into placing
capacitor bridges between branch circuits.) Another problem
is price - they don't appear much on Ebay, etc. as used devices,
and having to buy two units at retail would break the bank.
I'd definitely go with wireless if I could get away with just one
wireless ethernet adaptor, e.g. the Linksys WET54G, instead of
two.

*TimDaniels*

Bill M.
01-20-09, 01:14 PM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 10:20:14 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>"Bill M." wrote:
>> No, flashing a wireless router isn't the only way, but it's usually
>> cheaper since wireless routers cost less than bridges, probably due to
>> economy of scale. For example, the Linksys WET54G is an actual bridge
>> device, but it costs $80-85 new, depending on where you shop. Compare
>> that to a Linksys WRT54GL, for $60-65 new. Ebay usually has lots of
>> used wireless routers that would be suitable, but you'll typically
>> find far fewer bridges for sale.
>
>
> I see several WET54G wireless ethernet bridges for sale on Ebay
> at widely varying prices. Remembering that the router upstairs can
> connect to a device wirelessly, would one or two wireless bridges
> be needed to form the link between the modem downstairs and the
> router upstairs?
>
>*TimDaniels*

If I'm following the story correctly, you're suggesting the modem will
remain downstairs and everything else (wireless router, desktop PC,
laptop, and printer) will all move upstairs. All of the equipment
upstairs would continue to be connected to the router via Cat5 cables.

I don't think that will work since it would require the bridge to be
placed downstairs, cabled to the modem, and connecting as a client to
the router's built in Access Point. That would put the bridge on the
router's LAN, while it needs to be on the router's WAN in that case.
Swapping the router and the bridge should work, leaving the router
cabled to the modem and acting as an Access Point, and the bridge
located upstairs acting as a wireless client. Unfortunately, that
probably means you need more ports upstairs, such as you'd find on a
switch or router.

To sum up, a single bridge device is required. It would be best to
leave the router downstairs with the modem and place the bridge
upstairs. The bridge only has a single Ethernet port, so you'll likely
need a device (switch, router, even a hub, etc) that can provide
additional ports for your 3 networked devices.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-20-09, 03:17 PM
"Bill M." wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>> No, flashing a wireless router isn't the only way, but it's usually
>>> cheaper since wireless routers cost less than bridges, probably due to
>>> economy of scale. For example, the Linksys WET54G is an actual bridge
>>> device, but it costs $80-85 new, depending on where you shop. Compare
>>> that to a Linksys WRT54GL, for $60-65 new. Ebay usually has lots of
>>> used wireless routers that would be suitable, but you'll typically
>>> find far fewer bridges for sale.
>>
>>
>> I see several WET54G wireless ethernet bridges for sale on Ebay
>> at widely varying prices. Remembering that the router upstairs can
>> connect to a device wirelessly, would one or two wireless bridges
>> be needed to form the link between the modem downstairs and the
>> router upstairs?
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> If I'm following the story correctly, you're suggesting the modem will
> remain downstairs and everything else (wireless router, desktop PC,
> laptop, and printer) will all move upstairs. All of the equipment
> upstairs would continue to be connected to the router via Cat5 cables.
>
> I don't think that will work since it would require the bridge to be
> placed downstairs, cabled to the modem, and connecting as a client
> to the router's built in Access Point. That would put the bridge on the
> router's LAN, while it needs to be on the router's WAN in that case.
> Swapping the router and the bridge should work, leaving the router
> cabled to the modem and acting as an Access Point, and the bridge
> located upstairs acting as a wireless client. Unfortunately, that
> probably means you need more ports upstairs, such as you'd find on
> a switch or router.
>
> To sum up, a single bridge device is required. It would be best to
> leave the router downstairs with the modem and place the bridge
> upstairs. The bridge only has a single Ethernet port, so you'll likely
> need a device (switch, router, even a hub, etc) that can provide
> additional ports for your 3 networked devices.
>
> --
> Bill


But that would necessitate buying multiple devices to accomplish my
goal - a financial no-no. At this point, I'm re-considering coaxial cable.
It would have to run along the floor, up a corner of the interior wall,
and penetrate an asbestos-containing plaster ceiling - OR run it along
the floor, through a sliding glass door frame to the outside and then up
an exterior patio wall to penetrate the bedroom floor above. I'd want
to use compression-fit connectors - which means buying an expensive
tool or hiring a professional cabler from Craigslist to do the work. OR
switching to DSL. OR leaving the home office in the livingroom and
telling the future roommate to live somewhere else. :-)

Thanks for your insights, guys.

*TimDaniels*

Bill M.
01-20-09, 03:31 PM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 10:49:20 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>
> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.

While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
you probably need.

>
> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?

Just one.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-20-09, 04:28 PM
"Bill M." wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>
>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>
> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
> you probably need.
>
>>
>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>
> Just one.
>
> --
> Bill

OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
how to set it up?

*TimDaniels*

$Bill
01-20-09, 05:11 PM
Timothy Daniels wrote:
>
> But that would necessitate buying multiple devices to accomplish my
> goal - a financial no-no.

Switches/hubs are cheap.

Bill M.
01-20-09, 08:56 PM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 14:28:46 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>"Bill M." wrote:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>>
>>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>>
>> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
>> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
>> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
>> you probably need.
>>
>>>
>>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>>
>> Just one.
>>
>> --
>> Bill
>
> OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
> WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
> documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
> an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
> I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
> any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
> name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
> how to set it up?
>
>*TimDaniels*

Here's the best, most detailed, instructions that I found:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge

I would again advise to leave the existing router downstairs near the
modem. That router will be the Access Point. The flashed router will
be the Client, so it needs to be upstairs and all of the other 3
devices will plug into its LAN ports. It's WAN port will not be used
(unless you perform the step to assign the WAN port to the LAN.)

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-21-09, 12:04 AM
"Bill M." wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>>>
>>>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>>>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>>>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>>>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>>>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>>>
>>> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
>>> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
>>> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
>>> you probably need.
>>>
>>>>
>>>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>>>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>>>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>>>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>>>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>>>
>>> Just one.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Bill
>>
>> OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
>> WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
>> documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
>> an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
>> I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
>> any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
>> name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
>> how to set it up?
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> Here's the best, most detailed, instructions that I found:
> http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge
>
> I would again advise to leave the existing router downstairs near the
> modem. That router will be the Access Point. The flashed router will
> be the Client, so it needs to be upstairs and all of the other 3
> devices will plug into its LAN ports. It's WAN port will not be used
> (unless you perform the step to assign the WAN port to the LAN.)
>
> --
> Bill

Thanks for the informative link. You don't say why you'd recommend
the Wireless Client mode instead of the Wireless Bridge mode. In the
Wireless Client mode, would the laptop connect wirelessly to the
upstairs client router or only to the downstairs Access Point router?
In the Wireless Bridge mode, would the laptop be able to connect
wirelessly to just the upstairs router, to either router, or to just the
downstairs router?

*TimDaniels*

Bill M.
01-21-09, 01:36 AM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 22:04:23 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>"Bill M." wrote:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>>>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>>>>
>>>>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>>>>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>>>>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>>>>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>>>>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>>>>
>>>> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
>>>> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
>>>> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
>>>> you probably need.
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>>>>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>>>>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>>>>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>>>>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>>>>
>>>> Just one.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Bill
>>>
>>> OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
>>> WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
>>> documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
>>> an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
>>> I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
>>> any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
>>> name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
>>> how to set it up?
>>>
>>>*TimDaniels*
>>
>> Here's the best, most detailed, instructions that I found:
>> http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge
>>
>> I would again advise to leave the existing router downstairs near the
>> modem. That router will be the Access Point. The flashed router will
>> be the Client, so it needs to be upstairs and all of the other 3
>> devices will plug into its LAN ports. It's WAN port will not be used
>> (unless you perform the step to assign the WAN port to the LAN.)
>>
>> --
>> Bill
>
> Thanks for the informative link. You don't say why you'd recommend
> the Wireless Client mode instead of the Wireless Bridge mode.

Actually, I recommend the Client Bridge mode and not Client mode, if I
may use the names that are used in dd-wrt.

If you go the dd-wrt route, you'll see several options under Wireless
Mode, including "Client Bridge" and "Client". The difference between
them is that Client Bridge simply extends your existing LAN, (I think
this is what you want), while Client mode creates a new subnet for the
devices hanging off its LAN ports. So in Client mode the result would
be a double NAT situation, which is generally less desirable unless
you have unique requirements.


> In the
> Wireless Client mode, would the laptop connect wirelessly to the
> upstairs client router or only to the downstairs Access Point router?
> In the Wireless Bridge mode, would the laptop be able to connect
> wirelessly to just the upstairs router, to either router, or to just the
> downstairs router?
>
>*TimDaniels*

In both Client and Client Bridge modes, no wireless devices can
connect to this router since its sole purpose is to connect to an
access point, which will be your wireless router downstairs.
Therefore, the laptop would only be able to connect (wirelessly) to
the router downstairs, or via Ethernet cable to the flashed router
upstairs.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-21-09, 01:51 PM
"Bill M." replied:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>>>>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>>>>>
>>>>>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>>>>>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>>>>>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>>>>>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>>>>>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>>>>>
>>>>> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
>>>>> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
>>>>> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
>>>>> you probably need.
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>>>>>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>>>>>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>>>>>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>>>>>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>>>>>
>>>>> Just one.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Bill
>>>>
>>>> OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
>>>> WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
>>>> documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
>>>> an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
>>>> I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
>>>> any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
>>>> name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
>>>> how to set it up?
>>>>
>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>
>>> Here's the best, most detailed, instructions that I found:
>>> http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge
>>>
>>> I would again advise to leave the existing router downstairs near the
>>> modem. That router will be the Access Point. The flashed router will
>>> be the Client, so it needs to be upstairs and all of the other 3
>>> devices will plug into its LAN ports. It's WAN port will not be used
>>> (unless you perform the step to assign the WAN port to the LAN.)
>>>
>>> --
>>> Bill
>>
>> Thanks for the informative link. You don't say why you'd
>> recommend the Wireless Client mode instead of the Wireless
>> Bridge mode.
>
> Actually, I recommend the Client Bridge mode and not Client mode,
> if I may use the names that are used in dd-wrt.
>
> If you go the dd-wrt route, you'll see several options under Wireless
> Mode, including "Client Bridge" and "Client". The difference between
> them is that Client Bridge simply extends your existing LAN, (I think
> this is what you want), while Client mode creates a new subnet for the
> devices hanging off its LAN ports. So in Client mode the result would
> be a double NAT situation, which is generally less desirable unless
> you have unique requirements.
>
>
>> In the
>> Wireless Client mode, would the laptop connect wirelessly to the
>> upstairs client router or only to the downstairs Access Point router?
>> In the Wireless Bridge mode, would the laptop be able to connect
>> wirelessly to just the upstairs router, to either router, or to just the
>> downstairs router?
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> In both Client and Client Bridge modes, no wireless devices can
> connect to this router since its sole purpose is to connect to an
> access point, which will be your wireless router downstairs.
> Therefore, the laptop would only be able to connect (wirelessly) to
> the router downstairs, or via Ethernet cable to the flashed router
> upstairs.
>
> --
> Bill

Thanks, Bill, for clearing that up. Yes, what I've been looking for
is a device for the Client Bridge mode. I'll watch Ebay for a deal
on another WRT54GS. I've also been considering a temporary
switch to DSL (while I find a job). It would not only be cheaper,
but since the upstairs bedroom has telephone wiring, there wouldn't
be a problem in getting broadband service there. I think I could
tolerate 1.5Mbps or 3.0Mbps for a few months while I waited for
a WRT54GS to appear at a low price on Ebay and then did the
flash to the dd-wrt firmware. At that point, expect some more
questions here about configuring the bridge. :-)

Thanks again.

*TimDaniels*

Timothy Daniels
01-21-09, 03:08 PM
"Bill M." explained:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>>>>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>>>>>
>>>>>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>>>>>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>>>>>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>>>>>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>>>>>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>>>>>
>>>>> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
>>>>> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
>>>>> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
>>>>> you probably need.
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>>>>>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>>>>>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>>>>>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>>>>>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>>>>>
>>>>> Just one.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Bill
>>>>
>>>> OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
>>>> WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
>>>> documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
>>>> an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
>>>> I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
>>>> any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
>>>> name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
>>>> how to set it up?
>>>>
>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>
>>> Here's the best, most detailed, instructions that I found:
>>> http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge
>>>
>>> I would again advise to leave the existing router downstairs near the
>>> modem. That router will be the Access Point. The flashed router will
>>> be the Client, so it needs to be upstairs and all of the other 3
>>> devices will plug into its LAN ports. It's WAN port will not be used
>>> (unless you perform the step to assign the WAN port to the LAN.)
>>>
>>> --
>>> Bill
>>
>> Thanks for the informative link. You don't say why you'd recommend
>> the Wireless Client mode instead of the Wireless Bridge mode.
>
> Actually, I recommend the Client Bridge mode and not Client mode, if I
> may use the names that are used in dd-wrt.
>
> If you go the dd-wrt route, you'll see several options under Wireless
> Mode, including "Client Bridge" and "Client". The difference between
> them is that Client Bridge simply extends your existing LAN, (I think
> this is what you want), while Client mode creates a new subnet for the
> devices hanging off its LAN ports. So in Client mode the result would
> be a double NAT situation, which is generally less desirable unless
> you have unique requirements.
>
>
>> In the
>> Wireless Client mode, would the laptop connect wirelessly to the
>> upstairs client router or only to the downstairs Access Point router?
>> In the Wireless Bridge mode, would the laptop be able to connect
>> wirelessly to just the upstairs router, to either router, or to just the
>> downstairs router?
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> In both Client and Client Bridge modes, no wireless devices can
> connect to this router since its sole purpose is to connect to an
> access point, which will be your wireless router downstairs.
> Therefore, the laptop would only be able to connect (wirelessly) to
> the router downstairs, or via Ethernet cable to the flashed router
> upstairs.
>
> --
> Bill

I found this at the Linksys website:
http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200

The configuration uses a WAP54G as a Wirless Repeater.
It looks like I could do what I want by using the WAP54G upstairs
with a mix of wired and wireless connections to the desktop, laptop,
and printer, and leave the existing WRT54GS wireless router
downstairs wired directly to the modem. Do you think that would
work? Ebay lists a lot of WAP54G's at affordable prices, and
documentation for configuring them can be downloaded from
the Linksys website.

*TimDaniels*

Bill M.
01-21-09, 04:27 PM
On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 11:51:54 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>"Bill M." replied:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>"Bill M." wrote:
>>>>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Wired to wireless adapter:
>>>>>>>> http://www.linksysbycisco.com/US/en/products/WET54G
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> My major problem is financial. Making all the devices connect
>>>>>>> wirelessly would involve buying and installing two wireless adaptors -
>>>>>>> one for the desktop and one for the printer (and the printer will be
>>>>>>> sitting right next to the desktop). The WET54G does look like a
>>>>>>> proper candidate for the job of simulating the ethernet link, though.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> While the WET54G is a proper candidate, you'd get more functionality
>>>>>> at potentially a lower cost by flashing a router. In addition to the
>>>>>> basic bridge function, you'd also get the additional LAN ports that
>>>>>> you probably need.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> What intrigues me is the idea of using a single WET54G (many are
>>>>>>> sold on Ebay) for the link between the modem downstairs and the
>>>>>>> WRT54GS wireless router upstairs. Could just one WET54G
>>>>>>> form that connection with the WRT54GS router upstairs, or would
>>>>>>> I need 2 WET54G's - one at the modem and another at the router?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Just one.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Bill
>>>>>
>>>>> OK, so there's a viable option to running cable upstairs - a single
>>>>> WET54G or a single flashed WRT54GS. Is there any online
>>>>> documentation on setting up the downstairs flashed WRT54GS as
>>>>> an ethernet adaptor to link to the upstairs unflashed WRT54GS?
>>>>> I looked at the dd-wrt.com website, and there doesn't seem to be
>>>>> any description of that function and how to set it up. Is there a
>>>>> name for that function that would help in finding instructions on
>>>>> how to set it up?
>>>>>
>>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>>
>>>> Here's the best, most detailed, instructions that I found:
>>>> http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge
>>>>
>>>> I would again advise to leave the existing router downstairs near the
>>>> modem. That router will be the Access Point. The flashed router will
>>>> be the Client, so it needs to be upstairs and all of the other 3
>>>> devices will plug into its LAN ports. It's WAN port will not be used
>>>> (unless you perform the step to assign the WAN port to the LAN.)
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Bill
>>>
>>> Thanks for the informative link. You don't say why you'd
>>> recommend the Wireless Client mode instead of the Wireless
>>> Bridge mode.
>>
>> Actually, I recommend the Client Bridge mode and not Client mode,
>> if I may use the names that are used in dd-wrt.
>>
>> If you go the dd-wrt route, you'll see several options under Wireless
>> Mode, including "Client Bridge" and "Client". The difference between
>> them is that Client Bridge simply extends your existing LAN, (I think
>> this is what you want), while Client mode creates a new subnet for the
>> devices hanging off its LAN ports. So in Client mode the result would
>> be a double NAT situation, which is generally less desirable unless
>> you have unique requirements.
>>
>>
>>> In the
>>> Wireless Client mode, would the laptop connect wirelessly to the
>>> upstairs client router or only to the downstairs Access Point router?
>>> In the Wireless Bridge mode, would the laptop be able to connect
>>> wirelessly to just the upstairs router, to either router, or to just the
>>> downstairs router?
>>>
>>>*TimDaniels*
>>
>> In both Client and Client Bridge modes, no wireless devices can
>> connect to this router since its sole purpose is to connect to an
>> access point, which will be your wireless router downstairs.
>> Therefore, the laptop would only be able to connect (wirelessly) to
>> the router downstairs, or via Ethernet cable to the flashed router
>> upstairs.
>>
>> --
>> Bill
>
> Thanks, Bill, for clearing that up. Yes, what I've been looking for
> is a device for the Client Bridge mode. I'll watch Ebay for a deal
> on another WRT54GS. I've also been considering a temporary
> switch to DSL (while I find a job). It would not only be cheaper,
> but since the upstairs bedroom has telephone wiring, there wouldn't
> be a problem in getting broadband service there. I think I could
> tolerate 1.5Mbps or 3.0Mbps for a few months while I waited for
> a WRT54GS to appear at a low price on Ebay and then did the
> flash to the dd-wrt firmware. At that point, expect some more
> questions here about configuring the bridge. :-)
>
> Thanks again.
>
>*TimDaniels*
>

No problem. Just so you know, there are LOTS of different models that
are dd-wrt compatible, with the latest list available here:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Supported_Devices
I just wanted to make sure you know you aren't limited to the WRT54GS.
Before you bid/buy, it might be good to check the Supported list to
see if there are any issues. Good luck with the network, and with the
job search.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-21-09, 06:52 PM
"Bill M." offerred:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>> I found this at the Linksys website:
>>
>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200
>>
>> The configuration uses a WAP54G as a Wirless Repeater.
>> It looks like I could do what I want by using the WAP54G upstairs
>> with a mix of wired and wireless connections to the desktop, laptop,
>> and printer, and leave the existing WRT54GS wireless router
>> downstairs wired directly to the modem. Do you think that would
>> work? Ebay lists a lot of WAP54G's at affordable prices, and
>> documentation for configuring them can be downloaded from
>> the Linksys website.
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> I haven't run across anyone using a WAP54G as an AP Client, but it
> certainly looks like it should work, and of course since it's a
> supported operating mode there would be no flashing of firmware
> required, further simplifying things.
>
> I would use these instructions to configure it.
> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4202
>
> Keep in mind that a WAP54G in AP Client mode offers only one Ethernet
> LAN port, so you still need a switch or other device to provide
> additional ports. Also, the laptop will not be able to connect
> wirelessly to the WAP54G when it's running in AP Client mode, but the
> laptop will be able to connect wirelessly to the wireless router
> downstairs if the signal is strong enough.
>
> --
> Bill

That seems to be the configuration for Access Point Client mode -
which operates as you say and needs a switch to connect to the
end devices. But the configuration for the Wireless Repeater mode
is shown here:
http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200

It would seem that the configuration for this, the Wireless Repeater
mode is what I could use. Devices not hardwired could connect to
the LAN and to the Internet via either the router or the access point,
depending on which IP address is used for their wireless connection.
What do you think?

*TimDaniels*

Bill M.
01-21-09, 06:57 PM
On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 13:08:41 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

> I found this at the Linksys website:
> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200
>
> The configuration uses a WAP54G as a Wirless Repeater.
> It looks like I could do what I want by using the WAP54G upstairs
> with a mix of wired and wireless connections to the desktop, laptop,
> and printer, and leave the existing WRT54GS wireless router
> downstairs wired directly to the modem. Do you think that would
> work? Ebay lists a lot of WAP54G's at affordable prices, and
> documentation for configuring them can be downloaded from
> the Linksys website.
>
>*TimDaniels*

I haven't run across anyone using a WAP54G as an AP Client, but it
certainly looks like it should work, and of course since it's a
supported operating mode there would be no flashing of firmware
required, further simplifying things.

I would use these instructions to configure it.
http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4202

Keep in mind that a WAP54G in AP Client mode offers only one Ethernet
LAN port, so you still need a switch or other device to provide
additional ports. Also, the laptop will not be able to connect
wirelessly to the WAP54G when it's running in AP Client mode, but the
laptop will be able to connect wirelessly to the wireless router
downstairs if the signal is strong enough.

--
Bill

Bill M.
01-21-09, 10:07 PM
On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 16:52:37 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

>
>"Bill M." offerred:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>
>>> I found this at the Linksys website:
>>>
>>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200
>>>
>>> The configuration uses a WAP54G as a Wirless Repeater.
>>> It looks like I could do what I want by using the WAP54G upstairs
>>> with a mix of wired and wireless connections to the desktop, laptop,
>>> and printer, and leave the existing WRT54GS wireless router
>>> downstairs wired directly to the modem. Do you think that would
>>> work? Ebay lists a lot of WAP54G's at affordable prices, and
>>> documentation for configuring them can be downloaded from
>>> the Linksys website.
>>>
>>>*TimDaniels*
>>
>> I haven't run across anyone using a WAP54G as an AP Client, but it
>> certainly looks like it should work, and of course since it's a
>> supported operating mode there would be no flashing of firmware
>> required, further simplifying things.
>>
>> I would use these instructions to configure it.
>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4202
>>
>> Keep in mind that a WAP54G in AP Client mode offers only one Ethernet
>> LAN port, so you still need a switch or other device to provide
>> additional ports. Also, the laptop will not be able to connect
>> wirelessly to the WAP54G when it's running in AP Client mode, but the
>> laptop will be able to connect wirelessly to the wireless router
>> downstairs if the signal is strong enough.
>>
>> --
>> Bill
>
> That seems to be the configuration for Access Point Client mode -
> which operates as you say and needs a switch to connect to the
> end devices. But the configuration for the Wireless Repeater mode
> is shown here:
> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200
>
> It would seem that the configuration for this, the Wireless Repeater
> mode is what I could use. Devices not hardwired could connect to
> the LAN and to the Internet via either the router or the access point,
> depending on which IP address is used for their wireless connection.
> What do you think?
>
>*TimDaniels*

By all means, I encourage you to give that mode a try. Best case, it
will meet your needs, with the caveat that you'll still likely need a
switch or other device to provide additional Ethernet ports because
the WAP54G only has one.

Worst case, though, wireless repeaters can be trouble prone. They have
to spend half their time listening and the other half talking, minus
some for overhead, so throughput really starts to be affected. I just
not have had much luck with repeaters, so I'm a bit jaded. Either way,
though, it's only a few clicks to switch modes. My money is still on
the AP Client mode for your situation as being most reliable, but it
looks like you have valid choices.

--
Bill

Timothy Daniels
01-22-09, 12:29 AM
"Bill M." advised:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>
>>"Bill M." offerred:
>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>> I found this at the Linksys website:
>>>>
>>>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200
>>>>
>>>> The configuration uses a WAP54G as a Wirless Repeater.
>>>> It looks like I could do what I want by using the WAP54G upstairs
>>>> with a mix of wired and wireless connections to the desktop, laptop,
>>>> and printer, and leave the existing WRT54GS wireless router
>>>> downstairs wired directly to the modem. Do you think that would
>>>> work? Ebay lists a lot of WAP54G's at affordable prices, and
>>>> documentation for configuring them can be downloaded from
>>>> the Linksys website.
>>>>
>>>>*TimDaniels*
>>>
>>> I haven't run across anyone using a WAP54G as an AP Client, but it
>>> certainly looks like it should work, and of course since it's a
>>> supported operating mode there would be no flashing of firmware
>>> required, further simplifying things.
>>>
>>> I would use these instructions to configure it.
>>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4202
>>>
>>> Keep in mind that a WAP54G in AP Client mode offers only one Ethernet
>>> LAN port, so you still need a switch or other device to provide
>>> additional ports. Also, the laptop will not be able to connect
>>> wirelessly to the WAP54G when it's running in AP Client mode, but the
>>> laptop will be able to connect wirelessly to the wireless router
>>> downstairs if the signal is strong enough.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Bill
>>
>> That seems to be the configuration for Access Point Client mode -
>> which operates as you say and needs a switch to connect to the
>> end devices. But the configuration for the Wireless Repeater mode
>> is shown here:
>>
>> http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4200
>>
>> It would seem that the configuration for this, the Wireless Repeater
>> mode is what I could use. Devices not hardwired could connect to
>> the LAN and to the Internet via either the router or the access point,
>> depending on which IP address is used for their wireless connection.
>> What do you think?
>>
>>*TimDaniels*
>
> By all means, I encourage you to give that mode a try. Best case, it
> will meet your needs, with the caveat that you'll still likely need a
> switch or other device to provide additional Ethernet ports because
> the WAP54G only has one.

Gleeep! I didn't realize that. I was envisioning the 4 ethernet ports
of a WRT54GS router. Back to square one - which may be the
dd-wrt firmware flashed to a WRT54GS and using it in the Repeater
Bridge mode, as in:
http://dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Repeater_Bridge#Client_Bridge_works.2C_Repeater_Bridge_doesn.27t_.2F_Only_one_network_can_be_encrypt ed

and http://dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Image:Repeater_Bridge.jpg


> Worst case, though, wireless repeaters can be trouble prone. They
> have to spend half their time listening and the other half talking, minus
> some for overhead, so throughput really starts to be affected. I just
> not have had much luck with repeaters, so I'm a bit jaded. Either way,
> though, it's only a few clicks to switch modes. My money is still on
> the AP Client mode for your situation as being most reliable, but it
> looks like you have valid choices.
>
> --
> Bill

Thanks for all the information and education, Bill.
DSL is looking better and better... :-)

*TimDaniels*

Bill M.
01-22-09, 01:58 AM
On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 22:29:04 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:

> Thanks for all the information and education, Bill.
> DSL is looking better and better... :-)
>
>*TimDaniels*

Gosh, I wasn't trying to push you toward DSL! :)
By all means, though, do what's best for you. I'm sure it will all
work out.

--
Bill

Robert Coe
01-25-09, 04:24 PM
On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 17:58:05 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
<SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote:
: Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
:
: I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
: I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
: via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
: to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
: to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
: The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
: terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
: just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
: the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
: a device (or devices) that can do this?
:
: *TimDaniels*

Yes. What you're talking about is a "wireless bridge". To construct one,
you'll need two additional wireless devices: access points, not routers.
WAP54G's (even old ones) will do. Configure them in bridge mode; tell each of
them (via their GUI's) about the MAC address of the other; and assign them to
a channel other than the one on which you want your wireless router to
operate. Then connect one of them (via Ethernet cable) to your cable modem and
the other (also via Ethernet cable) to the WAN side of your router. Turn them
on; they should sync up automatically; and you should be fine.

Bob

Robert Coe
01-25-09, 06:17 PM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 00:58:21 -0800, "Timothy Daniels" : > If good, then pick
up a wireless router that can run dd-wrt firmware,
: > (I'm partial to the Linksys WRT54GL, but the dd-wrt website lists
: > many supported models), which you would configure as a 'wireless
: > client bridge'. The wireless router downstairs would be the Access Point,
: > and the wireless router upstairs would be the client. The client connects
: > to the AP and shares the connection via its 4 LAN ports.
:
: Does that mean that the only way to provide a wireless bridge
: between the wireless router upstairs and the modem downstairs
: is to flash a wireless router with 3rd-party firmware?

Absolutely not. Virtually any old (and I do mean old) Wireless-G access point
has the capability to act as half of a bridge. Just make sure that both sides
are the same model, to guard against any manufacturer-specific idiosyncracies.

Bob

Robert Coe
01-25-09, 06:35 PM
On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 13:14:41 -0600, Bill M. <wbillups@hotmail.com> wrote:
: If I'm following the story correctly, you're suggesting the modem will
: remain downstairs and everything else (wireless router, desktop PC,
: laptop, and printer) will all move upstairs. All of the equipment
: upstairs would continue to be connected to the router via Cat5 cables.
:
: I don't think that will work since it would require the bridge to be
: placed downstairs, cabled to the modem, and connecting as a client to
: the router's built in Access Point. That would put the bridge on the
: router's LAN, while it needs to be on the router's WAN in that case.
: Swapping the router and the bridge should work, leaving the router
: cabled to the modem and acting as an Access Point, and the bridge
: located upstairs acting as a wireless client. Unfortunately, that
: probably means you need more ports upstairs, such as you'd find on a
: switch or router.

Ideally, you'd like to place the bridge on the LAN side of the router, because
that's where internal IP addresses are available. If you construct the bridge
out of two access points (the most straightforward method), they'll try to
obtain IP addresses; and if they do, you can manage them in situ by their Port
90 GUIs. But once it's been set up, a bridge doesn't need much management, so
the additional convenience may not be worth the hassle. That said, it's easy
enough to locate the router downstairs with the modem and generate your
additional ports with a mini-hub connected to the upstairs end of the bridge.
That's what I did, and it works fine. (I *haven't* been able to get my cable
modem to work yet, but that's an entirely separate issue.)

Bob

Robert Coe
01-25-09, 06:39 PM
On Sun, 25 Jan 2009 19:35:02 -0500, Robert Coe <bob@1776.COM> wrote:
: On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 13:14:41 -0600, Bill M. <wbillups@hotmail.com> wrote:
: : If I'm following the story correctly, you're suggesting the modem will
: : remain downstairs and everything else (wireless router, desktop PC,
: : laptop, and printer) will all move upstairs. All of the equipment
: : upstairs would continue to be connected to the router via Cat5 cables.
: :
: : I don't think that will work since it would require the bridge to be
: : placed downstairs, cabled to the modem, and connecting as a client to
: : the router's built in Access Point. That would put the bridge on the
: : router's LAN, while it needs to be on the router's WAN in that case.
: : Swapping the router and the bridge should work, leaving the router
: : cabled to the modem and acting as an Access Point, and the bridge
: : located upstairs acting as a wireless client. Unfortunately, that
: : probably means you need more ports upstairs, such as you'd find on a
: : switch or router.
:
: Ideally, you'd like to place the bridge on the LAN side of the router, because
: that's where internal IP addresses are available. If you construct the bridge
: out of two access points (the most straightforward method), they'll try to
: obtain IP addresses; and if they do, you can manage them in situ by their Port
: 90 GUIs.

A typo. It's port 80 (Web interface).

: But once it's been set up, a bridge doesn't need much management, so
: the additional convenience may not be worth the hassle. That said, it's easy
: enough to locate the router downstairs with the modem and generate your
: additional ports with a mini-hub connected to the upstairs end of the bridge.
: That's what I did, and it works fine. (I *haven't* been able to get my cable
: modem to work yet, but that's an entirely separate issue.)
:
: Bob

Timothy Daniels
01-25-09, 11:22 PM
"Robert Coe" wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
> : I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> : I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> : via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> : to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> : to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> : The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> : terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> : just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> : the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> : a device (or devices) that can do this?
> :
> : *TimDaniels*
>
> Yes. What you're talking about is a "wireless bridge". To construct one,
> you'll need two additional wireless devices: access points, not routers.
> WAP54G's (even old ones) will do. Configure them in bridge mode; tell each of
> them (via their GUI's) about the MAC address of the other; and assign them to
> a channel other than the one on which you want your wireless router to
> operate. Then connect one of them (via Ethernet cable) to your cable modem and
> the other (also via Ethernet cable) to the WAN side of your router. Turn them
> on; they should sync up automatically; and you should be fine.
>
> Bob

I believe this is what you mean:
http://linksys.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/linksys.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=4202
,
where my WRT54GS wireless router would take the place of the switch, and
the downstairs WAP54G would connect directly to the modem.
But I'd have to buy two WAP54G's, and that's a wee bit beyond my budget.

*TimDaniels*

Dan Atkins
04-26-09, 08:55 AM
"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
> *TimDaniels*
>
>

Can't you just buy a wireless card for the pc?

Dan

f/fgeorge
04-26-09, 09:39 AM
On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 14:55:12 +0100, "Dan Atkins" <no@spam.com> wrote:

>"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
>news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
>> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>>
>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>
>> *TimDaniels*

An Access Point may do what you want. You will need to buy two access
points nad they will both HAVE to be LinkSys brand! An access point,
setup in Bridge mode, is basically what you want, a wireless
connection plugged into one thing, usually a router, and then the
other end plugged into something else, usually a switch or hub. The
two access points talk amongst themselves, creating a wireless Bridge
between the 2 wired devices.

Dan Atkins
04-26-09, 12:02 PM
"f/fgeorge" <ffgeorge@yourplace.com> wrote in message
news:u8s8v4d4u65atgqtamllq5andif2pjq35r@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 14:55:12 +0100, "Dan Atkins" <no@spam.com> wrote:
>
>>"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
>>news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
>>> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>>>
>>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>>> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>>> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>>
>>> *TimDaniels*
>
> An Access Point may do what you want. You will need to buy two access
> points nad they will both HAVE to be LinkSys brand! An access point,
> setup in Bridge mode, is basically what you want, a wireless
> connection plugged into one thing, usually a router, and then the
> other end plugged into something else, usually a switch or hub. The
> two access points talk amongst themselves, creating a wireless Bridge
> between the 2 wired devices.


Not necessarily, i used to have a standard netgear router hooked up to my
cable modem, and then a dd-wrt linksys router which acted as a client to the
netgear one. I think its called 'Client Mode Wireless', check it out on
their website http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge , it
definatly works with only one linksys dd-wrt as I've had it working before
so you should beable to get away with your current router and then just
having to purchase the one linksys. I've got a Linksys WRT54GS v7 with the
dd-wrt firmware on it.

Dan

Dan Atkins
04-26-09, 12:03 PM
"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
> *TimDaniels*
>
>

Sorry i think i gave the wrong link

http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Client_Bridged

Dan

Dan Atkins
04-26-09, 12:04 PM
Sorry i think i gave the wrong link

http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Client_Bridged

Dan

"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>
> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>
> *TimDaniels*
>
>

Dan Atkins
04-26-09, 12:07 PM
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Client_Mode_Wireless

Sorry i will get the right link lol

Dan

"Dan Atkins" <no@spam.com> wrote in message
news:0024903d$0$18592$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com...
> Sorry i think i gave the wrong link
>
> http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Client_Bridged
>
> Dan
>
> "Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
> news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
>> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>>
>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>> just believe me.) The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable. Is there
>> a device (or devices) that can do this?
>>
>> *TimDaniels*
>>
>>
>

seelee
04-27-09, 08:55 PM
On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 14:55:12 +0100, "Dan Atkins" <no@spam.com> wrote:

>"Timothy Daniels" <SpamBucket@NoSpamPlease.biz> wrote in message
>news:Fc6dnfig2PA0sujUnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d@earthlink.com...
>> Linksys's Support personnel struck out on this, but here goes:
>>
>> I have a Linksys wireless router, model no. WRT54GS, v.7.
>> I have a desktop, a laptop, and a printer connected to the router
>> via cat 5 cables running10Mb Ethernet. The router also connects
>> to a cable modem via cat 6 cable running 10Mb Ethernet. I want
>> to move the router, desktop, laptop, and printer upstairs in my condo.
>> The cable modem must remain downstairs where the coaxial cable
>> terminates because of difficulties in running a cable upstairs. (Please
>> just believe me.)

I believe ya, dude.

>> The problem is how to link the cable modem to
>> the router by wirelessly simulating an Ethernet cable.

Why can't you just hook a wireless router up to the modem with Cat5
(Most have wired connections as well as wireless) and get a wireless
card for your PCs? You wouldn't have to run any wire, and any
additional investment would be minimal.

--
clee