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Albretch
04-23-08, 02:00 PM
I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell phone as a
wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless router:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA

What are the physical and technical foundations of this? And I know I may
have to do some heavy reading, which I don't mind at all.

He mentioned that 3G phones are better. Why?

Also I would rather do a presentation to my students using Linux. Do you
know of any Linux-based radio frequencies gauger as he showed with Windows?

thanks
lbrtchx

ps56k
04-23-08, 02:27 PM
Albretch wrote:
> I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell
> phone as a wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless
> router:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA
>
> What are the physical and technical foundations of this? And I know
> I may have to do some heavy reading, which I don't mind at all.
>
> He mentioned that 3G phones are better. Why?
>
> Also I would rather do a presentation to my students using Linux. Do
> you know of any Linux-based radio frequencies gauger as he showed
> with Windows?
>
>
wow - pretty neat - but I'm lost :(
How did the "Ethernet induction" plugged into the Ethernet jack
help get more signals to the Wifi list ?

Albretch
04-23-08, 02:39 PM
> wow - pretty neat - but I'm lost :(
> How did the "Ethernet induction" plugged into the Ethernet jack
> help get more signals to the Wifi list ?
~
electromagnetism bro ;-)
~
it is the same basic reason why parallel wires have cross wire effects
(inductance is it called in Physics)
~
lbrtchx

ps56k
04-23-08, 04:07 PM
Albretch wrote:
> I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell
> phone as a wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless
> router:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA
>
> What are the physical and technical foundations of this? And I know
> I may have to do some heavy reading, which I don't mind at all.
>
> He mentioned that 3G phones are better. Why?
>
> Also I would rather do a presentation to my students using Linux. Do
> you know of any Linux-based radio frequencies gauger as he showed
> with Windows?
>
"students" ?? what kind of class ?

ok - ask them how this might work ?

hmmm - let's see -
cellphone with anything from 900Mhz to 1900Mhz "receiving"
wrapped with a UTP wire around it produces exactly what ??

and then - it gets into the computer via this Ethernet cable jack
magically appearing on the screen as a "cellphone"
and dragging distance 2.4Ghz signals to the networking adapters ?

and his YouTube language..... techno babble -

nice presentation, and percieved results,
maybe he should have gone into the US political administration

Bill Kearney
04-23-08, 04:41 PM
It's entirely bogus and you fell for it.


"Albretch" <lbrtchx@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1208977225.709686@nntp.acecape.com...
> I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell phone as
> a
> wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless router:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA
>
> What are the physical and technical foundations of this? And I know I may
> have to do some heavy reading, which I don't mind at all.
>
> He mentioned that 3G phones are better. Why?
>
> Also I would rather do a presentation to my students using Linux. Do you
> know of any Linux-based radio frequencies gauger as he showed with
> Windows?
>
> thanks
> lbrtchx

Mark McIntyre
04-23-08, 04:42 PM
Albretch wrote:
> I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell phone as a
> wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless router:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA
>
> What are the physical and technical foundations of this?

Without even watching the video, the phrase "none and none" springs to
mind. Having watched it, I'm in complete agreement with myself.

Cellphones operate at any of several different frequencys, all designed
not to generate EM interference with other equipment. So your cell ought
not even to be detectable by the wireless router, and vice-versa.

Even if you could get your phone to interact with the router, you'd then
have to get your phone to convert the wireless protocol into something
it could send over the (analog) phone system - ie some s/w running on
the phone.

And as for wrapping some ethernet cable round your cellphone and
plugging it into the ethernet socket of your pc to "act as an antenna" o
some sort - ROFLPML.

> He mentioned that 3G phones are better. Why?

Cos its a wind-up and if you spend $$$ of a 3G phone just to achieve
this, it'd be even funnier.

Note: There /are/ some 3G cellphones which have builtin wifi.

DTC
04-23-08, 04:44 PM
Albretch wrote:
> I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell phone as a
> wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless router:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA
>
> What are the physical and technical foundations of this? And I know I may
> have to do some heavy reading, which I don't mind at all.

* WiFi enabled computer? (I guess he means it has a wireless card
installed)
* latency of signals?
* momentum of other signals and noise?
* extrapolate signal form other networks?
* cellphones self IP?
* cellphones search for network pings?

Incomprehensible gobblegook comes to mind. Read all the 2,590 plus
comments to his video.

> He mentioned that 3G phones are better. Why?

Since he appears clueless, I wouldn't have a clue.

> Also I would rather do a presentation to my students using Linux. Do you
> know of any Linux-based radio frequencies gauger as he showed with Windows?

Kimset comes to mind. http://www.kismetwireless.net
Or run a windows app under WINE.

ps56k
04-23-08, 06:41 PM
DTC wrote:
> Albretch wrote:
>> I found this amusingly interesting link about how to a your cell
>> phone as a wireless signal receiver to go online using a wireless
>> router: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LY8Wi7XRXCA
>>
>> What are the physical and technical foundations of this? And I
>> know I may have to do some heavy reading, which I don't mind at all.
>
> * WiFi enabled computer? (I guess he means it has a wireless card
> installed)
> * latency of signals?
> * momentum of other signals and noise?
> * extrapolate signal form other networks?
> * cellphones self IP?
> * cellphones search for network pings?
>
> Incomprehensible gobblegook comes to mind. Read all the 2,590 plus
> comments to his video.
>

it's not really a Hoax.... but can't really come up with another word -
other than April Fool's -