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Jeff Liebermann
04-20-08, 08:36 PM
On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 18:14:05 -0700 (PDT), fig000
<neilnewton001@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Last year I got a Buffalo Airstation wireless G access point. It was
>new but came with no instructions (the person who sold it to me
>offerred it to his church but they had already bought one.
>
>He set it up for me, providing the login and password to get into the
>security and access tabs in the console. He also created an ssid and a
>wep code (I think that's what it's called).
>
>I am no longer at that job and through varous circumstances, I'm no
>longer able to get my hands on all the logins, passwords and wep code.
>My grandson is getting an xbox and I want to give him internet access.
>I guess, short of having the codes, I'll have to reset the Buffalo and
>start from scratch.
>
>I suppose there are factory defaults I can re-instate. In fact I have
>no real reason to password protect anything though I may try. I'd like
>to how I can accomplish all this. If not I'll have to buy a new access
>point and use their documentation.
>
>Any help would be appreciated.

Whenever you inherit a used routers, it's a good idea to clear all the
settings and start from scratch. Otherwise, you'll be chasing some
obscure problem that was caused by some obscure setting that the
previous owner had used in their setup.
<http://www.buffalotech.com/knowledgebase/users/kb.php?id=10014&category_id=0&sid2=>
Audible tones? I've never heard any tones.

Also, please do NOT use WEP encryption. It's not very secure and
easily cracked. It also has ASCII->Hex key conversion oddities. Use
WPA or WPA2 instead.
--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Jeff Liebermann
04-21-08, 10:42 AM
On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 19:49:50 -0700 (PDT), fig000
<neilnewton001@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for answering so incredibly quickly.

Sorry. I'll answer more slowly next time.

>1. I held the init button down for more than 15 seconds and, like you
>heard no beeps but saw a red light flashing.
>1. Now it seems I can no longer get into the console using 192.168.1.1
>on a desktop machine that is hardwired into the buffalo (it sends me
>to ask.com with some links). I could do this when I first got the
>buffalo.

The default IP address for most Buffalo is 192.168.11.1. The older
Airstation is 192.168.1.1. Since you didn't bother to disclose the
exact model number, I can't supply a URL for the Buffalo install
instructions.

Make sure you're using a wired ethernet connection for initial
configuration, not wireless.

>2. My laptop now shows two version of the network. One is "wrt" (the
>original name of the network) and the other is called "dd-wrt".

Ok. Your friend installed alternative firmware. The default IP
address for DD-WRT is 192.168.1.1 The default login is "root" with a
password of "admin". See:
<http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page>

I'm not sure what "wrt" means. It might be OpenWRT or a variety of
other alternative firmware mutations. You can identify which is yours
by turning it off, and seeing which one disappears from the wireless
list.

Make sure you're using a wired ethernet connection for initial
configuration, not wireless.

>Despite the fact that the laptop seems to think there's a connection,
>no web page will come up.

You need to configure the WAN (internet) interface for DHCP to go with
your cable modem.

>This happened to me before when I first got
>the buffalo and I had to mess with the mac address to make it work.

Messing with the MAC means that you need to clone the MAC address of
your PC. Your unspecified cable provider apparently uses the MAC
address for authentication. It should be on the WAN (internet)
configuration page. Make sure you're using a wired ethernet
connection for initial configuration, not wireless, using the same PC
that you originally used to setup to clone the MAC address. If
unavailable, use some other PC that's not going to walk away (i.e.
desktop). After cloning the MAC address, power DOWN both the modem
and the router so that the new MAC addresses are registered in both on
power up. If you cable modem has a big backup battery (as in Arris
VoIP routers), you'll need to tap the reset button to reboot. Then,
call your cable broadband vendor to have them re-authenticate your
connection.

>However that was in the console and I can't get into the console.

What's a console?

>Not
>sure the mac address is the problem but since the buffalo is reset, it
>stands to reason that something will have to be changed again.

Look for "Clone Mac Address". That copies the MAC address from your
PC to the routers WAN (internet) port so that your cable company
thinks it's talking directly to your computah.

>Maybe I should buy a linksys :-).

You give up far too soon. When you get DD-WRT on the screen, look in
the upper right hand corner for the version number. The current
version is DD-WRT v24 RC6.2. When you can identify the exact model
Buffalo product, I'll point you to the location of the latest firmware
to install.

>I agree with you wholeheartedly about not using a used access point. I
>had anticipated this but ignored the issue. Now I'm paying for it.

Paying for it? I like that idea. Send money via PayPal to my email
address.

Nothing wrong with using used access points. Your problem is that you
didn't document your setup, save your settings, or even record your
passwords. I have mine on a spreadsheet. I think there are currently
200 logins and passwords listed (most with different passwords). Get
organized.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558