PDA

View Full Version : Which Wireless Desktop Card?



SpreadTooThin
04-19-08, 01:05 PM
I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
Its a dual frequency wireless router.
To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
my PC?

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 12:04 AM
On Apr 19, 11:05*am, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> my PC?

shameless bump!

TBerk
04-24-08, 01:05 AM
On Apr 23, 9:04 pm, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Apr 19, 11:05 am, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> > my PC?
>
> shameless bump!

It is generally thought you'll have less trouble if you 'keep it in
the family' so to speak.

(Re)define your search in 11.n Linksys cards and see what you find.


TBerk

F8BOE
04-24-08, 01:21 AM
SpreadTooThin wrote:

> I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> my PC?

Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 11:17 AM
On Apr 23, 11:05*pm, TBerk <bayareab...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Apr 23, 9:04 pm, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > On Apr 19, 11:05 am, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> > > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> > > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> > > my PC?
>
> > shameless bump!
>
> It is generally thought you'll have less trouble if you 'keep it in
> the family' so to speak.
>
> (Re)define your search in 11.n Linksys cards and see what you find.
>
> TBerk

The router is 2.4 and 5 GHz.. wireless N.
There are no Dual Band wireless N cards offered by linksys...

LR
04-24-08, 11:45 AM
SpreadTooThin wrote:
> On Apr 23, 11:05 pm, TBerk <bayareab...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> On Apr 23, 9:04 pm, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> On Apr 19, 11:05 am, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
>>>> Its a dual frequency wireless router.
>>>> To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
>>>> my PC?
>>> shameless bump!
>> It is generally thought you'll have less trouble if you 'keep it in
>> the family' so to speak.
>>
>> (Re)define your search in 11.n Linksys cards and see what you find.
>>
>> TBerk
>
> The router is 2.4 and 5 GHz.. wireless N.
> There are no Dual Band wireless N cards offered by linksys...
>
What is wrong with USB? Linksys WUSB600N

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 12:39 PM
On Apr 24, 9:45*am, LR <l...@privacy.net> wrote:
> SpreadTooThin wrote:
> > On Apr 23, 11:05 pm, TBerk <bayareab...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >> On Apr 23, 9:04 pm, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >>> On Apr 19, 11:05 am, SpreadTooThin <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>> I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> >>>> Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> >>>> To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> >>>> my PC?
> >>> shameless bump!
> >> It is generally thought you'll have less trouble if you 'keep it in
> >> the family' so to speak.
>
> >> (Re)define your search in 11.n Linksys cards and see what you find.
>
> >> TBerk
>
> > The router is 2.4 and 5 GHz.. wireless N.
> > There are no Dual Band wireless N cards offered by linksys...
>
> What is wrong with USB? Linksys WUSB600N

I can't exactly leave a usb key in the system.. it too easy to
steal...
Seems odd that they haven't put out a pci card...

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 12:46 PM
On Apr 23, 11:21*pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
> SpreadTooThin wrote:
> > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> > my PC?
>
> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.

No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
like the router...

LR
04-24-08, 01:07 PM
SpreadTooThin wrote:

> I can't exactly leave a usb key in the system.. it too easy to
> steal...
Which means it is also easy to put away when you have finished using it.

seaweedsl
04-24-08, 01:14 PM
Too bad USB is not an option for you, then. Your pc must be in a
public place?

Do you intend to use both of the 600N radios at once ? Linksys
suggests this as a possibility.

In this case, get their N card and also a Dual A/G, I suppose.

Or do you just plan to use one band, but want to switch back and forth
depending on, um, current interference? Or ...

Aaron Leonard
04-24-08, 01:47 PM
~ > SpreadTooThin wrote:
~ > > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
~ > > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
~ > > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
~ > > my PC?
~ >
~ > Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.
~
~ No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
~ like the router...

I don't know that there exists a good draft-N 2.4/5GHz PCI card.

If 802.11a/b/g meets your needs, then you might consider our PI21AG
(supported in Windows 2000/XP and soon Vista.)

Aaron

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 02:24 PM
On Apr 24, 11:14*am, seaweedsl <seaweedst...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Too bad USB is not an option for you, then. *Your pc must be in a
> public place?
>
> Do you intend to use both of the 600N radios at once ? *Linksys
> suggests this as a possibility.
>
> In this case, get their N card and also a Dual A/G, I suppose.
>
> Or do you just plan to use one band, but want to switch back and forth
> depending on, um, current *interference? *Or ...

The 2.4GHz frequency is just too cluttered with other networks.. can't
keep a reliable signal..

Jeff Liebermann
04-24-08, 02:54 PM
On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 11:24:13 -0700 (PDT), SpreadTooThin
<bjobrien62@gmail.com> wrote:

>The 2.4GHz frequency is just too cluttered with other networks.. can't
>keep a reliable signal..

Google is your friend. Search for "802.11a PCI card".
<http://www.proxim.com/products/cp/pci.html>

There are plenty of PCMCIA/CardBus dual band cards available. All you
need is a CardBus to PCI adapter.
<http://www.nextag.com/pci-pcmcia-adapter/search-html>
One of my customers uses this because their worthless software vendor
keyed the copy protection to the wireless card MAC address. So, to
use it in multiple locations, he moves the card.

There are also adapters between MiniPCI (laptop) cards and PCI. Many
PCI wireless cards are these adapters, with the MiniPCI card
"integrated" onto the board.

One of my former customers had a problem with employees stealing the
easily removable antennas from the wireless desktops. Amazingly, some
of them still work with no antenna. If you go with PCMCIA to PCI
adapter route, the card can easily be removed and stolen. If USB is
unacceptable due to theft issues, I don't think the adapter solution
will work for you.

Reminder: MIMO Pre-802.11n and such is all about speed (at least the
spacial diversity style is). It's not going to give you more range.
If you're shooting through walls or more than perhaps 20ft, might as
well buy an 802.11a PCI card.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

F8BOE
04-24-08, 03:40 PM
SpreadTooThin wrote:

> On Apr 23, 11:21*pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
>> SpreadTooThin wrote:
>> > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
>> > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
>> > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
>> > my PC?
>>
>> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.
>
> No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
> like the router...


A ha... It semms that you don't even know what you're looking for.

Google may be your friend.

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 07:42 PM
> >The 2.4GHz frequency is just too cluttered with other networks.. can't
> >keep a reliable signal..
>
> Google is your friend. *Search for "802.11a PCI card".
> <http://www.proxim.com/products/cp/pci.html>
>

Pardon me but this isn't wireless n.. its a/b/g

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 07:43 PM
On Apr 24, 1:40*pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
> SpreadTooThin wrote:
> > On Apr 23, 11:21*pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
> >> SpreadTooThin wrote:
> >> > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> >> > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> >> > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> >> > my PC?
>
> >> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.
>
> > No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
> > like the router...
>
> A ha... It semms that you don't even know what you're looking for.
>
I know what I'm looking for ... I just can't believe that linksys
doesn't have it...



> Google may be your friend.

ps56k
04-24-08, 09:07 PM
> I know what I'm looking for ... I just can't believe that linksys
> doesn't have it...

If you don't want the a/b/g card,
and keep insisting on the "n" support....

then go away -
Google for it - and go buy it -

ps56k
04-24-08, 09:28 PM
SpreadTooThin wrote:
> On Apr 23, 11:21 pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
>> SpreadTooThin wrote:
>>> I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
>>> Its a dual frequency wireless router.
>>> To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
>>> my PC?
>>
>> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.
>
> No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
> like the router...

so... to summarize;
can't use 2.4Ghz because it's too cluttered... but want dual channel anyway
can't use USB because this desktop might have people stealing things - dorm
??
can't use 802.11a (5Ghz) card because it's not 802.11n and you "require n"
can't find PCI card because....

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 10:07 PM
On Apr 24, 7:28*pm, "ps56k" <pschuman_no_spam...@interserv.com> wrote:
> SpreadTooThin wrote:
> > On Apr 23, 11:21 pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
> >> SpreadTooThin wrote:
> >>> I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
> >>> Its a dual frequency wireless router.
> >>> To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
> >>> my PC?
>
> >> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.
>
> > No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
> > like the router...
>
> so... to summarize;
> can't use 2.4Ghz because it's too cluttered... but want dual channel anyway
> can't use USB because this desktop might have people stealing things - dorm
> ??
> can't use 802.11a (5Ghz) card because it's not 802.11n and you "require n"
> can't find PCI card because....

Pardon me.. 802.11a is 5Ghz?
Have I missed something?

SpreadTooThin
04-24-08, 10:25 PM
> > >> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.

Legacy 2.4 GHz 0.9 Mbit/s 2 Mbit/s ~20 Meters ~100 Meters
802.11a 5 GHz 23 Mbit/s 54 Mbit/s ~35 Meters ~120 Meters
802.11b 2.4 GHz 4.3 Mbit/s 11 Mbit/s ~38 Meters ~140 Meters
802.11g 2.4 GHz 19 Mbit/s 54 Mbit/s ~38 Meters ~140 Meters
802.11n 2.4/5 GHz 74 Mbit/s 248 Mbit/s ~70 Meters ~250 Meters
802.11y 3.7 GHz 23 Mbit/s 54 Mbit/s ~50 Meters ~5000 Meters

Even if 802.11a is 5 GHz it doesn't have the throughput of or the
range that n has..

So I called linksys and they said they have a card in the works.. it
will be out soon..
The only product they have the is dual band n is a usb key and if you
read this thread I can't use a USB key as it will likely be stolen...

I've searched around with google and can't find another manufacturer
(Other than apples Airport Extreme) that will do what I want...

Sorry to offend you fragile sences phase shift 56 K...

Jeff Liebermann
04-24-08, 10:32 PM
On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 16:42:56 -0700 (PDT), SpreadTooThin
<bjobrien62@gmail.com> wrote:

>> >The 2.4GHz frequency is just too cluttered with other networks.. can't
>> >keep a reliable signal..
>>
>> Google is your friend. *Search for "802.11a PCI card".
>> <http://www.proxim.com/products/cp/pci.html>

>Pardon me but this isn't wireless n.. its a/b/g

Correct. As I mentioned, 802.11n is all about speed. If you don't
need more speed than 802.11g can provide, then a compatible 802.11n
card will suffice. I also couldn't find one for 5.6GHz that does
Pre-802.11n Draft 2. However, if you don't need the speed, or need
range instead, just get an 802.11a PCI card.


--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558 jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# http://802.11junk.com jeffl@cruzio.com
# http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS

Jeff Liebermann
04-24-08, 11:06 PM
On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 19:25:19 -0700 (PDT), SpreadTooThin
<bjobrien62@gmail.com> wrote:

>Legacy 2.4 GHz 0.9 Mbit/s 2 Mbit/s ~20 Meters ~100 Meters
>802.11a 5 GHz 23 Mbit/s 54 Mbit/s ~35 Meters ~120 Meters
>802.11b 2.4 GHz 4.3 Mbit/s 11 Mbit/s ~38 Meters ~140 Meters
>802.11g 2.4 GHz 19 Mbit/s 54 Mbit/s ~38 Meters ~140 Meters
>802.11n 2.4/5 GHz 74 Mbit/s 248 Mbit/s ~70 Meters ~250 Meters

Apparently borrowed from:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11n#Comparison_chart>
I'm not sure where they obtained those numbers but there's a bit of
misinformation buried in them.

There are two type of technology specified in Pre-802.11n Draft 2.

One is beam forming, where a smart antenna attempts to put the antenna
gain in the direction of the wireless client, while simultaneously
putting nulls in the direction of interference. The antenna gain of
such systems is considerably more than the commodity 2dBi coaxial
antenna, and you might get 70 to 250 meters if everything were
perfect. However, the beam forming technology does not offer much in
the way of speed improvement over 802.11a/g at 25Mbits/sec max
thruput. Some models will do Super-G, Turbot-G, Afterburner, and
whatever to get to perhaps 50Mbits/sec, but such non standard
technologies are NOT part of 802.11n. Otherwise, the beam forming
flavor of 802.11n will work with literally any commodity 802.11a/g
client and does not require anything special in the client.

The other method is spacial multiplexing. This is where the access
point and the client have multiple radios, which transmit individual
data streams on each radio, simultaneously, and possibly on the same
frequencies. In theory, if each data stream takes a different path,
the data will not arrive simulaneously at the receiving end, thus
magically preventing interference between data streams. (I'm not sure
I completely understand how it works so treat my explanation with
suspicion). Under idea conditions, 3 radios will give you 3 times the
thruput. The problem is that it doesn't magically give you any
improvement in range over a single radio. Just more bandwidth.

The spacial mux crowed couldn't seem to achieve 3 times the thruput,
so they cheated. Instead of the xmit spectra occupying the usual
20Mhz, they increased it to 40MHz bandwidth. The also crammed in 54
OFDM carriers, in place of 802.11a/g 48 carriers. This gave them more
than double the thruput per channel, which makes the spacial mux
suitable for video. In theory, it can go 600Mbits/sec:
<http://www.wirevolution.com/2007/09/07/how-does-80211n-get-to-600mbps/>

However, you can get those impressive speeds only at short range.
Pre-802.11n Draft 2 spacial mux technology really doesn't like
interference, frequency selective fading, leagacy wi-fi, and long path
delays. The exception is multipath, with 802.11n spacial mux
*REQUIRES* to operate. Just about anything else in the 2.4Ghz band
will degrade the thruput. The junk increases the bit error rate which
causes the wireless router to slow down. If configured for 802.11a/g
compatibility, it will switch to 802.11a/g mode, essentially disabling
all the wonderful MIMO features for which you paid good money.

About the only situation where 802.11n spacial multiplexing makes
sense, is an enclosed area (i.e. a room), with both the wireless
router and client in the same area, and streaming HDTV video through
the link.

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558 jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# http://802.11junk.com jeffl@cruzio.com
# http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS

Bod43@hotmail.co.uk
04-25-08, 03:56 AM
On 25 Apr, 05:06, Jeff Liebermann <je...@cruzio.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 19:25:19 -0700 (PDT), SpreadTooThin
>
> <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >Legacy * * *2.4 GHz 0.9 Mbit/s * * *2 Mbit/s * * * * * * * *~20 Meters * * *~100 Meters
> >802.11a * * 5 GHz * 23 Mbit/s * * * 54 Mbit/s * * * ~35Meters * * *~120 Meters
> >802.11b * * 2.4 GHz 4.3 Mbit/s * * *11 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
> >802.11g * * 2.4 GHz 19 Mbit/s * * * 54 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
> >802.11n * * 2.4/5 GHz 74 Mbit/s * * 248 Mbit/s * * *~70 Meters * * *~250 Meters
>
>
> Under #idea# conditions, 3 radios will give you 3 times the
> thruput.
>

Some typos are just /really/ good.

seaweedsl
04-25-08, 09:19 AM
I repeat:

Do you intend to use both of the 600N radios at once ?

I think that we are all trying to understand the importance of N to
you if you don't want to use 2.4 Ghz band ?

And if you intend to use A, then there are countless adapters.

Unless, that is, you do intend to run both radios at once?

I have a client that fixes on optimization of a certain concept (in
this case, using all possible wifi bands), often without knowing why
or if he will really want/need to do all the things he insists he must
be able to do.

No offense intended, just a reality check. Once you achieve the holy
grail, will you really use both bands? I believe that you will need
two cards to do both bands simultaneously in any case.

SpreadTooThin
04-25-08, 11:15 AM
On Apr 25, 7:19*am, seaweedsl <seaweedst...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I repeat:
>
> Do you intend to use both of the 600N radios at once ?
>
> I think that we are all trying to understand the importance of N to
> you if you don't want to use 2.4 Ghz band ?
>
> And if you intend to use A, then there are countless adapters.
>
> Unless, that is, you do intend to run both radios at once?
>

No I just need one fast reliable channel, two would be nice but like I
said the 2.4GHz channel is
just to crowded.

> I have a client that fixes on optimization of a certain concept (in
> this case, using all possible wifi bands), often without knowing why
> or if he will really want/need to do all the things he insists he must
> be able to do.
>
Ya.. Gimme Gimme. :)


> No offense intended, just a reality check. *Once you achieve the holy
> grail, will you really use both bands? * I believe that you will need
> two cards to do both bands simultaneously in any case.

No like I said, I wasn't aware that 802.11a was 5Ghz, but it isn't as
fast as n... but that's a whole other discussion.
I can't use 2.4Ghz because its just become to cluttered.
Linksys makes a dual band USB key, but I can't use it because it will
just end up being stolen.
Linksys will produce a card, but when I don't know.
Till then I'm stuck with 802.11a...

Jeff Liebermann
04-25-08, 12:12 PM
On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 00:56:12 -0700 (PDT), Bod43@hotmail.co.uk wrote:

>On 25 Apr, 05:06, Jeff Liebermann <je...@cruzio.com> wrote:
>> On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 19:25:19 -0700 (PDT), SpreadTooThin
>>
>> <bjobrie...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >Legacy * * *2.4 GHz 0.9 Mbit/s * * *2 Mbit/s * * * * * * * *~20 Meters * * *~100 Meters
>> >802.11a * * 5 GHz * 23 Mbit/s * * * 54 Mbit/s * * * ~35 Meters * * *~120 Meters
>> >802.11b * * 2.4 GHz 4.3 Mbit/s * * *11 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
>> >802.11g * * 2.4 GHz 19 Mbit/s * * * 54 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
>> >802.11n * * 2.4/5 GHz 74 Mbit/s * * 248 Mbit/s * * *~70 Meters * * *~250 Meters
>>
>>
>> Under #idea# conditions, 3 radios will give you 3 times the
>> thruput.
>>

>Some typos are just /really/ good.

My typos, or the Wikipedia article mistakes? I noticed (after
posting) that there are few numbers that are wrong. The author(s)
mixed up over the air rates and connection data rates. The following
are connection data rates:

>802.11 * * *2.4 GHz 1.0 Mbit/s * * *2 Mbit/s * * *~20 Meters * * *~100 Meters
>802.11a * * 5.6 GHz * 6 Mbit/s * * 54 Mbit/s * * * ~35 Meters * * *~120 Meters
>802.11b * * 2.4 GHz 5.5 Mbit/s * *11 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
>802.11g * * 2.4 GHz 6 Mbit/s *** 54 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
>802.11n * * 2.4/5.6 GHz 74 Mbit/s ** 600 Mbit/s * * *~70 Meters * * *~250 Meters

If they mean maximum THRUPUT rates, it should be:
>802.11 * * *2.4 GHz 0.3 Mbit/s * 0.8 Mbit/s * * *~20 Meters * * *~100 Meters
>802.11a * * 5.6 GHz * 3 Mbit/s * * 24 Mbit/s * * * ~35 Meters * * *~120 Meters
>802.11b * * 2.4 GHz 2.1 Mbit/s * 5.8 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
>802.11g * * 2.4 GHz 3 Mbit/s *** 24 Mbit/s * * * ~38 Meters * * *~140 Meters
>802.11n * * 2.4/5.6 GHz ??? Mbit/s ** 240 Mbit/s * * *~70 Meters * * *~250 Meters

It's also different between TCP and UDP traffic. See:
<http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi#Performance_and_Speed>

As for the ranges shown, the tables are backwards. The longest range
should be at the slowest speeds.

I'm not sure about the 802.11n numbers.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

F8BOE
04-27-08, 06:18 AM
SpreadTooThin wrote:

> On Apr 24, 1:40*pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
>> SpreadTooThin wrote:
>> > On Apr 23, 11:21*pm, F8BOE <f8...@bluemail.ch> wrote:
>> >> SpreadTooThin wrote:
>> >> > I just bought a Linksys WRT600N...
>> >> > Its a dual frequency wireless router.
>> >> > To use the 5GHz channel what wireless card should I be installing in
>> >> > my PC?
>>
>> >> Any A/B/G or A/B card would go.
>>
>> > No I'm looking for Wireless N dual channel 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz ... Just
>> > like the router...
>>
>> A ha... It semms that you don't even know what you're looking for.
>>
> I know what I'm looking for ... I just can't believe that linksys
> doesn't have it...
>
>
>
>> Google may be your friend.


Because "n" is for 2.4 GHz only?