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dterrors@hotmail.com
03-30-08, 01:10 PM
Can the WRTG54L do client-bridge mode?

This is really pissing me off. I will never buy a router that can't
do client-bridge mode again.

P.Schuman
03-30-08, 01:21 PM
dterrors@hotmail.com wrote:
> Can the WRTG54L do client-bridge mode?
>
> This is really pissing me off. I will never buy a router that can't
> do client-bridge mode again.

I thought that these in general would only work as an AP or a Bridge,
but not both at the same time ?
I use an small stand alone wireless bridge - Linksys WET11 -
to connect our family room TiVo and Xbox to our WiFi.

Adair Winter
03-30-08, 03:22 PM
<dterrors@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:fb73bb9b-5ce6-4bbf-93ab-66c6a022a8ba@i29g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
>
> Can the WRTG54L do client-bridge mode?
>
> This is really pissing me off. I will never buy a router that can't
> do client-bridge mode again.

Yes it will, if you install DD-WRT on it..
I'm a WRT54G v5 as a game adapter for my brother in client bridge mode.

Adair

Jeff Liebermann
03-30-08, 04:48 PM
On Sun, 30 Mar 2008 11:10:50 -0700 (PDT), dterrors@hotmail.com wrote:

>Can the WRTG54L do client-bridge mode?

Yes it can, but not with the stock firmware.
Install DD-WRT:
<http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Client_Mode_Wireless>
<http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/3639271>

>This is really pissing me off. I will never buy a router that can't
>do client-bridge mode again.

Assumption, the mother of all screwups.

Incidentally, a "client mode bridge" only does bridging, not routing.
If you're shopping for a "client mode bride", don't go shopping for a
router.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Bill Kearney
03-30-08, 07:37 PM
> Incidentally, a "client mode bridge" only does bridging, not routing.
> If you're shopping for a "client mode bride", don't go shopping for a
> router.

Would that be a Russian mail order client mode bride? Heh.

You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
router out it's wired LAN ports.

dterrors@hotmail.com
03-30-08, 10:44 PM
On Mar 30, 8:37 pm, "Bill Kearney" <wkearne...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > Incidentally, a "client mode bridge" only does bridging, not routing.
> > If you're shopping for a "client mode bride", don't go shopping for a
> > router.
>
> You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
> router out it's wired LAN ports.

You mean if I install DD-WRT on it right?

Jeff Liebermann
03-31-08, 01:54 AM
On Sun, 30 Mar 2008 20:37:52 -0400, "Bill Kearney"
<wkearney99@hotmail.com> wrote:

>> Incidentally, a "client mode bridge" only does bridging, not routing.
>> If you're shopping for a "client mode bride", don't go shopping for a
>> router.

>Would that be a Russian mail order client mode bride? Heh.

Sheesh. Leave out one letter and this is what I get. At my age, a
mail order bride is about all I can get.

>You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
>router out it's wired LAN ports.

I think you mean out it's WAN port. The LAN port(s) go to the local
LAN network. You can also do something similar using WDS (wireless
distribution system) which simultaneously acts as a bridge and a
repeater. Although I guess you can use the router section to glue the
local LAN to yet another network, that's not the way it's usually done
(meaning I've never done it that way).

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Bill Kearney
03-31-08, 07:17 AM
<dterrors@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:a31eda8b-f436-448b-b9b4-bb9e7744e911@s19g2000prg.googlegroups.com...
> On Mar 30, 8:37 pm, "Bill Kearney" <wkearne...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> > Incidentally, a "client mode bridge" only does bridging, not routing.
>> > If you're shopping for a "client mode bride", don't go shopping for a
>> > router.
>>
>> You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
>> router out it's wired LAN ports.
>
> You mean if I install DD-WRT on it right?

Well, yes, of course.

Bill Kearney
03-31-08, 07:20 AM
>>Would that be a Russian mail order client mode bride? Heh.
>
> Sheesh. Leave out one letter and this is what I get. At my age, a
> mail order bride is about all I can get.

Well, someone's gotta be the 'geezer pleaser', right?

>>You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
>>router out it's wired LAN ports.
>
> I think you mean out it's WAN port. The LAN port(s) go to the local
> LAN network.

Now that you mention it, I'm not entirely sure. I just recall doing that on
our boat. Well, I did it for a short while until I added a 2nd router down
below that handles it instead.

> You can also do something similar using WDS (wireless
> distribution system) which simultaneously acts as a bridge and a
> repeater. Although I guess you can use the router section to glue the
> local LAN to yet another network, that's not the way it's usually done
> (meaning I've never done it that way).

Ugh, I despise WDS. Wireless is slow enough and prone to enough
interference without turning it into half-duplex walkie-talkies.

Yes, the port setups under DD-WRT are pretty flexible for routing.

-Bill Kearney

Jeff Liebermann
03-31-08, 10:47 AM
On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 08:20:33 -0400, "Bill Kearney"
<wkearney99@hotmail.com> wrote:

>>>Would that be a Russian mail order client mode bride? Heh.
>>
>> Sheesh. Leave out one letter and this is what I get. At my age, a
>> mail order bride is about all I can get.
>
>Well, someone's gotta be the 'geezer pleaser', right?

More like a crumudgeon. I just turned 60. I become a geezer in about
10 years.
<http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/slides/jeffl-wolf.html>

>>>You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
>>>router out it's wired LAN ports.
>>
>> I think you mean out it's WAN port. The LAN port(s) go to the local
>> LAN network.
>
>Now that you mention it, I'm not entirely sure. I just recall doing that on
>our boat. Well, I did it for a short while until I added a 2nd router down
>below that handles it instead.

Well, never having done it that way, I'm not sure either. I think it
will work, but I'm too lazy to try it.

>> You can also do something similar using WDS (wireless
>> distribution system) which simultaneously acts as a bridge and a
>> repeater. Although I guess you can use the router section to glue the
>> local LAN to yet another network, that's not the way it's usually done
>> (meaning I've never done it that way).
>
>Ugh, I despise WDS. Wireless is slow enough and prone to enough
>interference without turning it into half-duplex walkie-talkies.

Ummm... I hate to be the one to tell you this, but all Wi-Fi is half
duplex. You xmit and receive on the same frequency but not at the
same time. Worse, in any given area, only one wireless device can
transmit at a time. Collisions are always a problem. That's even
without WDS.

However, you don't have to use the repeater feature of WDS. It can
act as a client radio, but only to the WDS routers to which the client
is pre-configured. It's not an ideal situation, but does work.

>Yes, the port setups under DD-WRT are pretty flexible for routing.
>
>-Bill Kearney
--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Bill Kearney
03-31-08, 11:31 PM
>>Well, someone's gotta be the 'geezer pleaser', right?
>
> More like a crumudgeon. I just turned 60. I become a geezer in about
> 10 years.

Oh, right... 60 is the new 40, eh?

> Well, never having done it that way, I'm not sure either. I think it
> will work, but I'm too lazy to try it.

Heh, me neither.

> Ummm... I hate to be the one to tell you this, but all Wi-Fi is half
> duplex

Indeed, this I'm familiar with. I was mentioning it in the context of a WDS
setup acting to repeat the traffic, cutting the bandwidth even further.

> You xmit and receive on the same frequency but not at the
> same time. Worse, in any given area, only one wireless device can
> transmit at a time. Collisions are always a problem.

This is why I get a laugh when someone asks how to get 200 people on one
access point. It just doesn't work and it degrades quite terribly as the
collisions cascade into greater delays.

> However, you don't have to use the repeater feature of WDS. It can
> act as a client radio, but only to the WDS routers to which the client
> is pre-configured. It's not an ideal situation, but does work.

Yeah, but then you're to getting into the hassle of configuring WDS, which
requires doing so on both sides. I'm guessing a lot of 'client mode'
situations aren't being done by someone with config access to the host
router.

seaweedsl
04-01-08, 09:16 AM
On Mar 30, 9:44 pm, dterr...@hotmail.com wrote:

>
> You mean if I install DD-WRT on it right?



http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/3639271

Char Jackson
08-05-08, 09:49 PM
On Sun, 30 Mar 2008 23:54:25 -0700, Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com>
wrote:

>On Sun, 30 Mar 2008 20:37:52 -0400, "Bill Kearney"
><wkearney99@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>> Incidentally, a "client mode bridge" only does bridging, not routing.
>>> If you're shopping for a "client mode bride", don't go shopping for a
>>> router.

Why not? :) A router is usually cheaper than a bridge (or an AP or a
'range extender' or a ...) so get a supported router and run dd-wrt
firmware.

>>You can use a WRT54G as a client to another network AND have it act as a
>>router out it's wired LAN ports.
>
>I think you mean out it's WAN port. The LAN port(s) go to the local
>LAN network. You can also do something similar using WDS (wireless
>distribution system) which simultaneously acts as a bridge and a
>repeater. Although I guess you can use the router section to glue the
>local LAN to yet another network, that's not the way it's usually done
>(meaning I've never done it that way).

No, Bill was right. Running dd-wrt in client mode, the wireless
interface is the "WAN" port and the LAN ports are NAT'd as usual. You
still have a NAT router, just like the stock firmware provided, with
the exception that the WAN port is wireless instead of wired.