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pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-25-08, 07:23 PM
Hi,
I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
output.

Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.

I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
I possess).

I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
of Powerline adapter upstairs.

--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
to be wireless...

What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
this?

I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
this.


Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
Patty

Bill Kearney
03-25-08, 07:30 PM
> I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas.

Greater "dB" is not always the answer. The radio signals radiate in a
pattern. With omnidirectional antenna this pattern is more or less 'donut
shaped'. The higher dB antenna make that donut shape pretty flat
vertically. Using one inside a house rarely buys you any improvements.

What often works is to turn the antenna so it's pattern better covers the
desired area. This might mean turning the antenna horizontally to turn the
donut on it's side. It also sometimes helps to add a reflector as they also
help to adjust the coverage area.

> I do not want
> to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> output.

Why? They work.

> I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> this.

Just run a segment of CAT5 wire. By the time you buy powerline adapters
it'll no doubt be cheaper to have just run the wire.

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-25-08, 07:56 PM
On Mar 25, 8:30*pm, "Bill Kearney" <wkearne...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> > enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas.
>
> Greater "dB" is not always the answer. *The radio signals radiate in a
> pattern. *With omni directional antenna this pattern is more or less 'donut
> shaped'. *The higher dB antenna make that donut shape pretty flat
> vertically. *Using one inside a house rarely buys you any improvements.
>
> What often works is to turn the antenna so it's pattern better covers the
> desired area. *This might mean turning the antenna horizontally to turn the
> donut on it's side. *It also sometimes helps to add a reflector as they also
> help to adjust the coverage area.
>
> > *I do not want
> > to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> > output.
>
> Why? *They work.
>
> > I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> > perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> > this.
>
> Just run a segment of CAT5 wire. *By the time you buy Powerline adapters
> it'll no doubt be cheaper to have just run the wire.

Thanks. Tried turning antenna and such, no help. Have a wireless
detector as well as other things and just need to get signal
downstairs with some decent strength. This is a fairly new home and I
am not about to run Cat5 or have someone do it. Would have to run it
outside and back in and such... And if I did that, I still need
perhaps an AP on other end.

Looking for Powerline alternative to make it wireless or Powerline
with AP recommendations...

Thanks though
Patty

P.Schuman
03-25-08, 08:34 PM
pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mar 25, 8:30 pm, "Bill Kearney" <wkearne...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
>>> enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas.
>>
>> Greater "dB" is not always the answer. The radio signals radiate in a
>> pattern. With omni directional antenna this pattern is more or less
>> 'donut shaped'. The higher dB antenna make that donut shape pretty
>> flat vertically. Using one inside a house rarely buys you any
>> improvements.
>>
>> What often works is to turn the antenna so it's pattern better
>> covers the desired area. This might mean turning the antenna
>> horizontally to turn the donut on it's side. It also sometimes helps
>> to add a reflector as they also help to adjust the coverage area.
>>
>>> I do not want
>>> to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
>>> output.
>>
>> Why? They work.
>>
>>> I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
>>> perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
>>> this.
>>
>> Just run a segment of CAT5 wire. By the time you buy Powerline
>> adapters it'll no doubt be cheaper to have just run the wire.
>
> Thanks. Tried turning antenna and such, no help. Have a wireless
> detector as well as other things and just need to get signal
> downstairs with some decent strength. This is a fairly new home and I
> am not about to run Cat5 or have someone do it. Would have to run it
> outside and back in and such... And if I did that, I still need
> perhaps an AP on other end.
>
> Looking for Powerline alternative to make it wireless or Powerline
> with AP recommendations...
>

You might try experiment with rotating one of the antennas horizontal
and seeing if the pattern changes ?
Like the other person said, a vertical antenna radiates like a donut sitting
over the stick.

What are you using with the WiFi now ?
Can you walk around and see the "signal strength" ?

I was thinking of using the powerline stuff for the same reason...
The WiFi access point is upstairs in one extra bedroom/den,
and the family room is at the diaganol opposite end of the house behind the
garage.
The signal is ok - but not great -

BTW - in our family room
we added a wireless "bridge" and small Ethernet hub
to connect - TiVo + Xbox -
But, if you go powerline, you could have a small hub for any local stuff,
and then also add another WAP for downstairs WiFi.

It might be a challenge to get both the upstairs + downstairs AP's working
together ?

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-25-08, 08:54 PM
On Mar 25, 9:34*pm, "P.Schuman" <pschuman_no_spam...@interserv.com>
wrote:
> pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
> > On Mar 25, 8:30 pm, "Bill Kearney" <wkearne...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >>> I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> >>> enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas.
>
> >> Greater "dB" is not always the answer. The radio signals radiate in a
> >> pattern. With omni directional antenna this pattern is more or less
> >> 'donut shaped'. The higher dB antenna make that donut shape pretty
> >> flat vertically. Using one inside a house rarely buys you any
> >> improvements.
>
> >> What often works is to turn the antenna so it's pattern better
> >> covers the desired area. This might mean turning the antenna
> >> horizontally to turn the donut on it's side. It also sometimes helps
> >> to add a reflector as they also help to adjust the coverage area.
>
> >>> I do not want
> >>> to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> >>> output.
>
> >> Why? They work.
>
> >>> I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> >>> perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> >>> this.
>
> >> Just run a segment of CAT5 wire. By the time you buy Powerline
> >> adapters it'll no doubt be cheaper to have just run the wire.
>
> > Thanks. Tried turning antenna and such, no help. Have a wireless
> > detector as well as other things and just need to get signal
> > downstairs with some decent strength. This is a fairly new home and I
> > am not about to run Cat5 or have someone do it. Would have to run it
> > outside and back in and such... And if I did that, I still need
> > perhaps an AP on other end.
>
> > Looking for Powerline alternative to make it wireless or Powerline
> > with AP recommendations...
>
> You might try experiment with rotating one of the antennas horizontal
> and seeing if the pattern changes ?
> Like the other person said, a vertical antenna radiates like a donut sitting
> over the stick.
>
> What are you using with the WiFi now ?
> Can you walk around and see the "signal strength" ?
>
> I was thinking of using the Powerline stuff for the same reason...
> The WiFi access point is upstairs in one extra bedroom/den,
> and the family room is at the diagonal opposite end of the house behind the
> garage.
> The signal is ok - but not great -
>
> BTW - in our family room
> we added a wireless "bridge" and small Ethernet hub
> to connect - TiVo + Xbox -
> But, if you go Powerline, you could have a small hub for any local stuff,
> and then also add another WAP for downstairs WiFi.
>
> It might be a challenge to get both the upstairs + downstairs AP's working
> together ?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks a lot.

I think I will probably get 2 XE104's and then if I need to I will add
a wireless AP to the downstairs XE104 which I read can be done and
will work. 100% of the time, I am not sure.

I am going to use it for TiVo connectivity, streaming audio and
wireless.

The WRE54G range extender from Linksys did work but craped out about
2x a month and signal was not strong as repeaters usually 1/2 the
signal.

So I will give the XE104 a shot as opposed to using a Powerline with
wireless adapter. Read on Newegg and Amazon that these units have
failed quite a bit and they get hot.

There is a Powerline adapter (low bandwidth) in my boyfriends house
which has worked form day 1 without an issue. But of course his house
is a ranch all on one floor. But I do know that the circuit breakers
are different for the 2 outlets.

Thanks again
Patty

P.Schuman
03-25-08, 08:59 PM
pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mar 25, 8:30 pm, "Bill Kearney" <wkearne...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
>>> enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas.
>>
>> Greater "dB" is not always the answer. The radio signals radiate in a
>> pattern. With omni directional antenna this pattern is more or less
>> 'donut shaped'. The higher dB antenna make that donut shape pretty
>> flat vertically. Using one inside a house rarely buys you any
>> improvements.
>>
>> What often works is to turn the antenna so it's pattern better
>> covers the desired area. This might mean turning the antenna
>> horizontally to turn the donut on it's side. It also sometimes helps
>> to add a reflector as they also help to adjust the coverage area.
>>
>>> I do not want
>>> to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
>>> output.
>>
>> Why? They work.
>>
>>> I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
>>> perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
>>> this.
>>
>> Just run a segment of CAT5 wire. By the time you buy Powerline
>> adapters it'll no doubt be cheaper to have just run the wire.
>
> Thanks. Tried turning antenna and such, no help. Have a wireless
> detector as well as other things and just need to get signal
> downstairs with some decent strength. This is a fairly new home and I
> am not about to run Cat5 or have someone do it. Would have to run it
> outside and back in and such... And if I did that, I still need
> perhaps an AP on other end.
>
> Looking for Powerline alternative to make it wireless or Powerline
> with AP recommendations...

we have used the Netgear Ethernet series before - but not the wireless....
http://www.netgear.com/Products/PowerlineNetworking.aspx

Bill Kearney
03-26-08, 07:59 AM
> This is a fairly new home and I
> am not about to run Cat5 or have someone do it. Would have to run it
> outside and back in and such...

If it's a new home then it's even EASIER to run new wire. It's older homes
that have lots of trouble.

You do yourself a great disservice discounting this idea. Wire is cheap,
installing it is cheap, and it's far more reliable over time. Sure, your
upfront cost is higher but your headaches are virtually non-existant over
time.

> And if I did that, I still need
> perhaps an AP on other end.

Sure, and that way you get to set up wireless coverage at both locations in
a way that's best for each. No trouble with trying to stretch one coverage
area across the spaces and making for lousy signal at both. AP are cheap
these days.

I've never found powerline devices to be reliable enough to put up with
their added expense and hassle. No thanks.

Peter Pan
03-26-08, 09:06 AM
pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi,
> I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
> to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> output.
>
> Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
> amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
> enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>
> I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
> buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
> I possess).
>
> I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
> of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>
> --->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
> electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
> to be wireless...
>
> What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
> this?
>
> I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> this.
>
>
> Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
> Patty

Depends on if you want it simple or complicated.... There are various
types/manufacturers of powerline stuf, some expensive and some cheaper, but
the netgear stuff I use works as an ethernet bridge over a powerline
(powerline ethernet adapter
http://www.netgear.com/Products/PowerlineNetworking/PowerlineEthernetAdapters.aspx
about $140 for two/a pair).. I have one hooked into my wap/router/cable
modem, and the other plugs into the router side ((not the wan)) of a Linksys
wrt54g (under $50 at walmart) and one of the netgear powerline bridge
things... gives me both wired and wireless wherever I plug the stuff in
(usually downstairs, but when nice out, in the backyard by the
gazebo/hammock... gotta relax when surfing! :)

They (netgear) do make a combo ethernet bridge/access point
(http://www.netgear.com/Products/PowerlineNetworking/PowerlineWirelessAccessPoints.aspx)
however they are hard to find, so you may want to consider a plan B and go
for stuff that is reasonable cost but available easily.....

Peter Pan
03-26-08, 09:27 AM
pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:
>
> There is a Powerline adapter (low bandwidth) in my boyfriends house
> which has worked form day 1 without an issue. But of course his house
> is a ranch all on one floor. But I do know that the circuit breakers
> are different for the 2 outlets.
>
> Thanks again
> Patty

Breakers have absolutely NOTHING to do with it (in actuality things have to
be on the same circuit/leg off the TRANSFORMER, *NOT* breakers in a breaker
box)

Not sure how same leg off the transformer got changed to same circuit
breaker, but it a lie... once again, does *NOT* have to be on the same
breaker...... Suspect it has something to do with how something is wired...
Power in is usually 3 wires (two hots and a neutral, hot to neutral gives
you 120, and hot to hot 240.... suspect some people/electricians attempt to
"load balance" and wire some circuits to one hot and some to the other, in
effect that is a seperate "leg")


Just an aside on which unit/speed you need.. The actual internet connection
speed will determine how fast you can access the internet from anywhere (ie
if the cable/dsl modem is only 8Kb max, then the low speed(cheaper) stuff
that can do 14Mb is faster than you can do the internet, only need the
higher speed powerline stuff if you want to transfer files locally (from
machine to machine) and most computers have a max speed of 100, the 200 Mb
units ONLY work at speed higher than 100 if you have gigabit ethernet
stuff).

Airman Thunderbird
03-26-08, 09:45 AM
I've been using the Netgear powerline adapters for several years now, to
extend my wireless access several hundred yards to my ma-in-laws home
behind me. A Buffalo wireless access point at the far end of the
powerline system talks to her Buffalo Ethernet Converter with a good
signal. Did wrap a piece of cardboard with tinfoil and place it behind
the access point for boost. Definitely helped, but that's another story.
Anyway, the powerline adapters work well and are very stable. Believe I
bought them cheap from compgeeks as refurbished. I like them.

Bill Kearney wrote:
>> This is a fairly new home and I
>> am not about to run Cat5 or have someone do it. Would have to run it
>> outside and back in and such...
>
> If it's a new home then it's even EASIER to run new wire. It's older
> homes that have lots of trouble.
>
> You do yourself a great disservice discounting this idea. Wire is
> cheap, installing it is cheap, and it's far more reliable over time.
> Sure, your upfront cost is higher but your headaches are virtually
> non-existant over time.
>
>> And if I did that, I still need
>> perhaps an AP on other end.
>
> Sure, and that way you get to set up wireless coverage at both locations
> in a way that's best for each. No trouble with trying to stretch one
> coverage area across the spaces and making for lousy signal at both. AP
> are cheap these days.
>
> I've never found powerline devices to be reliable enough to put up with
> their added expense and hassle. No thanks.

Bob Smith
03-26-08, 10:59 AM
I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
success.

They consist of an injector installed at the router that connects the
router to the powerline via plugging it into a ac outlet and into the
router.

Then you have an access point plugged into the wall in another room.
The only requirement is that both units are on the same power feed
(the same power panel of the house).

I've installed up to 5 of the extenders in a home and had good success
with everyone having internet access.

The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
about 3-4 mb. They work great for streaming audio and video, normal
internet access, but NOT for file transfers.. real slow because of
the throughput limitations.


Bob Smith
Robert Smith Consulting


On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:23:21 -0700 (PDT), pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:

>Hi,
>I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
>enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
>to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
>output.
>
>Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
>amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
>enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>
>I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
>buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
>I possess).
>
>I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
>of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>
>--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
>electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
>to be wireless...
>
>What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
>this?
>
>I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
>perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
>this.
>
>
>Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
>Patty

Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
03-26-08, 11:35 AM
Bob Smith <na6t@na6t.com> fired this volley in
news:9dsku3po8qfhj2tma5ks7b5glr3cli60f4@4ax.com:

>
> I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
> success.
.....
> The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
> about 3-4 mb.


The old ones were low bandwidth. They have 85mb/s units, too.

And, not "on the same power panel", but on the same leg of the incoming
service. It's the same with any carrier-current device.

LLoyd

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-26-08, 04:01 PM
On Mar 26, 11:59*am, Bob Smith <n...@na6t.com> wrote:
> I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
> success.
>
> They consist of an injector installed at the router that connects the
> router to the powerline via plugging it into a ac outlet and into the
> router.
>
> Then you have an access point plugged into the wall in another room.
> The only requirement is that both units are on the same power feed
> (the same power panel of the house).
>
> I've installed up to 5 of the extenders in a home and had good success
> with everyone having internet access.
>
> The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
> about 3-4 mb. * They work great for streaming audio and video, normal
> internet access, but NOT for file transfers.. *real slow because of
> the throughput limitations.
>
> Bob Smith
> Robert Smith Consulting
>
>
>
> On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:23:21 -0700 (PDT), pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
> >Hi,
> >I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> >enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
> >to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> >output.
>
> >Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
> >amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
> >enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>
> >I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
> >buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
> >I possess).
>
> >I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
> >of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>
> >--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
> >electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
> >to be wireless...
>
> >What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
> >this?
>
> >I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> >perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> >this.
>
> >Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
> >Patty- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks Bob,
I ordered 2 Powerline adapters today from Newegg. I ordered the ones
that allow you to put 4 in your house. Did not order the highest
capacity one. I ordered 85 Mbps unit, model XE104.
Decided not to order the Powerline unit with a wireless unit at other
end. Read that they got hot, slow and are problematic.


Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
Ethernet.

Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
(recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?

Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
(when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
Squeezebox unit to stereo.


Thanks
Patty

seaweedsl
03-26-08, 07:51 PM
On Mar 26, 3:01 pm, pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mar 26, 11:59 am, Bob Smith <n...@na6t.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
> > success.
>
> > They consist of an injector installed at the router that connects the
> > router to the powerline via plugging it into a ac outlet and into the
> > router.
>
> > Then you have an access point plugged into the wall in another room.
> > The only requirement is that both units are on the same power feed
> > (the same power panel of the house).
>
> > I've installed up to 5 of the extenders in a home and had good success
> > with everyone having internet access.
>
> > The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
> > about 3-4 mb. They work great for streaming audio and video, normal
> > internet access, but NOT for file transfers.. real slow because of
> > the throughput limitations.
>
> > Bob Smith
> > Robert Smith Consulting
>
> > On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:23:21 -0700 (PDT), pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
> > >Hi,
> > >I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> > >enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
> > >to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> > >output.
>
> > >Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
> > >amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
> > >enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>
> > >I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
> > >buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
> > >I possess).
>
> > >I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
> > >of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>
> > >--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
> > >electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
> > >to be wireless...
>
> > >What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
> > >this?
>
> > >I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> > >perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> > >this.
>
> > >Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
> > >Patty- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> Thanks Bob,
> I ordered 2 Powerline adapters today from Newegg. I ordered the ones
> that allow you to put 4 in your house. Did not order the highest
> capacity one. I ordered 85 Mbps unit, model XE104.
> Decided not to order the Powerline unit with a wireless unit at other
> end. Read that they got hot, slow and are problematic.
>
> Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
> Ethernet.
>
> Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
> (recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
> Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
> (when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
> Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
> Thanks
> Patty

I think that you have got a good plan if running ethernet is
definitely out. I think that you are wise to avoid the wireless G
powerline for just the reasons you found. I do have one and it works
still, but does get amazingly hot. I have used the 102 and 103/104
series and they are good. I had read somewhere that Netgear went
with the wrong choice on the newest line, the "HD" as there are two
competing systems and one works better than the other, but in any
case, you went with the good one.

For wireless AP, you have the right idea too. Since you are not using
it as a fancy router or looking for maximum range, I'm going to
suggest you just get a cheapo. Truth is, there are $40 ones that can
work as good as the $100 ones.

I prefer the Buffalo but they are not sold in US now due to
lawsuit. I have not used any of these, but suggest you might try
this one :

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817201523 Read
the reviews and note that many people give bad ratings due to trying
to use as a repeater. Nothing works consistently well as a repeater
and you don't care.

or this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833190003

or this router used as an AP (easily done):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833166018

Read the reveiws and make your own choice.

Steve

meme_meme
03-27-08, 02:54 AM
On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 14:01:34 -0700 (PDT), pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:

>On Mar 26, 11:59*am, Bob Smith <n...@na6t.com> wrote:
>> I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
>> success.
>>
>> They consist of an injector installed at the router that connects the
>> router to the powerline via plugging it into a ac outlet and into the
>> router.
>>
>> Then you have an access point plugged into the wall in another room.
>> The only requirement is that both units are on the same power feed
>> (the same power panel of the house).
>>
>> I've installed up to 5 of the extenders in a home and had good success
>> with everyone having internet access.
>>
>> The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
>> about 3-4 mb. * They work great for streaming audio and video, normal
>> internet access, but NOT for file transfers.. *real slow because of
>> the throughput limitations.
>>
>> Bob Smith
>> Robert Smith Consulting
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:23:21 -0700 (PDT), pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>> >Hi,
>> >I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
>> >enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
>> >to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
>> >output.
>>
>> >Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
>> >amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
>> >enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>>
>> >I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
>> >buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
>> >I possess).
>>
>> >I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
>> >of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>>
>> >--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
>> >electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
>> >to be wireless...
>>
>> >What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
>> >this?
>>
>> >I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
>> >perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
>> >this.
>>
>> >Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
>> >Patty- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
>Thanks Bob,
>I ordered 2 Powerline adapters today from Newegg. I ordered the ones
>that allow you to put 4 in your house. Did not order the highest
>capacity one. I ordered 85 Mbps unit, model XE104.
>Decided not to order the Powerline unit with a wireless unit at other
>end. Read that they got hot, slow and are problematic.
>
>
>Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
>Ethernet.
>
>Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
>(recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
>Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
>(when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
>Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
>
>Thanks
>Patty
The way the units are set up is as follows:
1. wireless router is in utility room where there
'entertainment/tv/telephone utility panel is located.

2. The home plug adapter (XE-102) is located next to the router It
has a cat5 plug that you use to connect the adapter to the router LAN
port.

3. The home plug extenders (WGX-102) are located throughout the
house.

4. There is no connection on the extenders to enable you to connect a
wireless router to. They are just a 'plug in' unit with three lites
on the surface.

I've attached a pdf to this post showing how I set it up, this should
help you.


I also used the 102 variety because I heard about the heat problem..
The unit is only about 3" x 4" and does get hot. I used a netgear
wireless router but turned off the wireless portion because I was
using the extenders. I set all the extenders on FIXED IP addresses
because I didn't want the problem of them getting a DHCP IP when the
power fails in my part of the world, which happens about 6-10 times
each winter.

I don't think you can turn off the wireless on the Linksys router . I
gave each extender an SSID of the room where it was located. IE:
BEDROOM, KITCHEN, etc. I used the extenders instead of the router
wireless because of the setup of the house, 1 story, no attic to speak
of and really streeched out(about 500' from one end to the other and
in the shape of a streeched out 'L" . I also ran on piece of cat5
from the router to a HP all-in-one printer that I set at a fixed IP
of so everyone could print via the wireless to the printer.

Everything works great and the owner is happy. He works for Adobe and
told a few people at work and guess what, two different people from
Adobe Tech Support called me and asked about it because they had
similar problems with a streeched out house and didn't want to run cat
to wireless access points.

The install is real clean with just a small box plugged into the wall,
no antennas, power wall wart cords, etc. After you get the units
plugged in take your laptop and walk your house to be sure everything
works. The neat thing is that if you need a little better coverage,
just unplug the unit and move it to a different wall plug.

I've watched the owner be on the internet watching a video on his
laptop, his daughter streaming audio on her laptop and his wife using
webmail. They have a std DSL connection (1.5mb/256kb) and the
internal home system works great for what they need, at the right
price point,,

hope it works for you the same way,

Bob

Robert Smith Consulting
Fort Bragg, California

Bob Smith
03-27-08, 02:57 AM
On Thu, 27 Mar 2008 00:54:58 -0700, meme_meme <meme@myhouse.com>
wrote:

>On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 14:01:34 -0700 (PDT), pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>On Mar 26, 11:59*am, Bob Smith <n...@na6t.com> wrote:
>>> I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
>>> success.
>>>
>>> They consist of an injector installed at the router that connects the
>>> router to the powerline via plugging it into a ac outlet and into the
>>> router.
>>>
>>> Then you have an access point plugged into the wall in another room.
>>> The only requirement is that both units are on the same power feed
>>> (the same power panel of the house).
>>>
>>> I've installed up to 5 of the extenders in a home and had good success
>>> with everyone having internet access.
>>>
>>> The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
>>> about 3-4 mb. * They work great for streaming audio and video, normal
>>> internet access, but NOT for file transfers.. *real slow because of
>>> the throughput limitations.
>>>
>>> Bob Smith
>>> Robert Smith Consulting
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:23:21 -0700 (PDT), pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>>> >Hi,
>>> >I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
>>> >enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
>>> >to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
>>> >output.
>>>
>>> >Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
>>> >amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
>>> >enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>>>
>>> >I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
>>> >buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
>>> >I possess).
>>>
>>> >I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
>>> >of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>>>
>>> >--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
>>> >electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
>>> >to be wireless...
>>>
>>> >What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
>>> >this?
>>>
>>> >I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
>>> >perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
>>> >this.
>>>
>>> >Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
>>> >Patty- Hide quoted text -
>>>
>>> - Show quoted text -
>>
>>Thanks Bob,
>>I ordered 2 Powerline adapters today from Newegg. I ordered the ones
>>that allow you to put 4 in your house. Did not order the highest
>>capacity one. I ordered 85 Mbps unit, model XE104.
>>Decided not to order the Powerline unit with a wireless unit at other
>>end. Read that they got hot, slow and are problematic.
>>
>>
>>Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
>>Ethernet.
>>
>>Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
>>(recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>>
>>Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
>>(when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
>>Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>>
>>
>>Thanks
>>Patty
>The way the units are set up is as follows:
>1. wireless router is in utility room where there
>'entertainment/tv/telephone utility panel is located.
>
>2. The home plug adapter (XE-102) is located next to the router It
>has a cat5 plug that you use to connect the adapter to the router LAN
>port.
>
>3. The home plug extenders (WGX-102) are located throughout the
>house.
>
>4. There is no connection on the extenders to enable you to connect a
>wireless router to. They are just a 'plug in' unit with three lites
>on the surface.
>
>I've attached a pdf to this post showing how I set it up, this should
>help you.
>
>
>I also used the 102 variety because I heard about the heat problem..
>The unit is only about 3" x 4" and does get hot. I used a netgear
>wireless router but turned off the wireless portion because I was
>using the extenders. I set all the extenders on FIXED IP addresses
>because I didn't want the problem of them getting a DHCP IP when the
>power fails in my part of the world, which happens about 6-10 times
>each winter.
>
>I don't think you can turn off the wireless on the Linksys router . I
>gave each extender an SSID of the room where it was located. IE:
>BEDROOM, KITCHEN, etc. I used the extenders instead of the router
>wireless because of the setup of the house, 1 story, no attic to speak
>of and really streeched out(about 500' from one end to the other and
>in the shape of a streeched out 'L" . I also ran on piece of cat5
>from the router to a HP all-in-one printer that I set at a fixed IP
>of so everyone could print via the wireless to the printer.
>
>Everything works great and the owner is happy. He works for Adobe and
>told a few people at work and guess what, two different people from
>Adobe Tech Support called me and asked about it because they had
>similar problems with a streeched out house and didn't want to run cat
>to wireless access points.
>
>The install is real clean with just a small box plugged into the wall,
>no antennas, power wall wart cords, etc. After you get the units
>plugged in take your laptop and walk your house to be sure everything
>works. The neat thing is that if you need a little better coverage,
>just unplug the unit and move it to a different wall plug.
>
>I've watched the owner be on the internet watching a video on his
>laptop, his daughter streaming audio on her laptop and his wife using
>webmail. They have a std DSL connection (1.5mb/256kb) and the
>internal home system works great for what they need, at the right
>price point,,
>
>hope it works for you the same way,
>
>Bob
>
>Robert Smith Consulting
>Fort Bragg, California


If the PDF doesn't make it through the news server, drop me an e-mail
at

na6t at na6t dot com

and I'll send a copy to you,,

Bob

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-27-08, 08:39 AM
On Mar 27, 3:57*am, Bob Smith <n...@na6t.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 27 Mar 2008 00:54:58 -0700, meme_meme <m...@myhouse.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> >On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 14:01:34 -0700 (PDT), pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> >>On Mar 26, 11:59*am, Bob Smith <n...@na6t.com> wrote:
> >>> I've installed the Netgear powerline adapters in homes with real good
> >>> success.
>
> >>> They consist of an injector installed at the router that connects the
> >>> router to the powerline via plugging it into a ac outlet and into the
> >>> router.
>
> >>> Then you have an access point plugged into the wall in another room.
> >>> The only requirement is that both units are on the same power feed
> >>> (the same power panel of the house).
>
> >>> I've installed up to 5 of the extenders in a home and had good success
> >>> with everyone having internet access.
>
> >>> The only problem is that the throughput of the units is max'ed out at
> >>> about 3-4 mb. * They work great for streaming audio and video, normal
> >>> internet access, but NOT for file transfers.. *real slow because of
> >>> the throughput limitations.
>
> >>> Bob Smith
> >>> Robert Smith Consulting
>
> >>> On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:23:21 -0700 (PDT), pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
> >>> >Hi,
> >>> >I have a Linksys Router (WRT54GS0) upstairs and signal is not strong
> >>> >enough downstairs in my house even with 14db antennas. I do not want
> >>> >to burn any new third party firmware in the router and adjust power
> >>> >output.
>
> >>> >Note I did have a Linksys WRE54G wireless extender downstairs to
> >>> >amplify the signal but it was problematic and did not have a strong
> >>> >enough or consistent signal. It has since been tossed.
>
> >>> >I would like to have wireless access downstairs for laptop use (will
> >>> >buy this year), and streaming audio to a stereo (via a Squeezebox unit
> >>> >I possess).
>
> >>> >I would like to run a connection from my router upstairs to some sort
> >>> >of Powerline adapter upstairs.
>
> >>> >--->>Then downstairs I would like to pick up the signal through the
> >>> >electrical system via another Powerline adapter BUT I want the signal
> >>> >to be wireless...
>
> >>> >What is the best bet or choices/combinations of products to accomplish
> >>> >this?
>
> >>> >I guess I could use Ethernet Powerline adapters on both end and
> >>> >perhaps plug in another AP but perhaps there is a better way to do
> >>> >this.
>
> >>> >Thanks in advance for all suggestions...
> >>> >Patty- Hide quoted text -
>
> >>> - Show quoted text -
>
> >>Thanks Bob,
> >>I ordered 2 Powerline adapters today from Newegg. I ordered the ones
> >>that allow you to put 4 in your house. Did not order the highest
> >>capacity one. I ordered 85 Mbps unit, model XE104.
> >>Decided not to order the Powerline unit with a wireless unit at other
> >>end. Read that they got hot, slow and are problematic.
>
> >>Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
> >>Ethernet.
>
> >>Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
> >>(recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
> >>Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
> >>(when Penryns are fully deployed) *and streaming audio from PC to
> >>Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
> >>Thanks
> >>Patty
> >The way the units are set up is as follows:
> >1. *wireless router is in utility room where there
> >'entertainment/tv/telephone utility panel is located.
>
> >2. The home plug adapter (XE-102) is located next to the router *It
> >has a cat5 plug that you use to connect the adapter to the router LAN
> >port.
>
> >3. The home plug extenders (WGX-102) are located throughout the
> >house.
>
> >4. *There is no connection on the extenders to enable you to connect a
> >wireless router to. *They are just a 'plug in' unit with three lites
> >on the surface.
>
> >I've attached a pdf to this post showing how I set it up, this should
> >help you.
>
> >I also used the 102 variety because I heard about the heat problem..
> >The unit is only about 3" x 4" and does get hot. *I used a netgear
> >wireless router but turned off the wireless portion because I was
> >using the extenders. * I set all the extenders on FIXED IP addresses
> >because I didn't want the problem of them getting a DHCP IP when the
> >power fails in my part of the world, which happens about 6-10 times
> >each winter.
>
> >I don't think you can turn off the wireless on the Linksys router . *I
> >gave each extender an SSID of the room where it was located. IE:
> >BEDROOM, KITCHEN, etc. * I used the extenders instead of the router
> >wireless because of the setup of the house, 1 story, no attic to speak
> >of and really streeched out(about 500' from one end to the other and
> >in the shape of a streeched out 'L" . *I also ran on piece of cat5
> >from the router to a HP all-in-one printer that I set at a *fixed IP
> >of so everyone could print via the wireless to the printer.
>
> >Everything works great and the owner is happy. *He works for Adobe and
> >told a few people at work and guess what, two different people from
> >Adobe Tech Support called me and asked about it because they had
> >similar problems with a streeched out house and didn't want to run cat
> >to wireless access points.
>
> >The install is real clean with just a small box plugged into the wall,
> >no antennas, power wall wart cords, etc. *After you get the units
> >plugged in take your laptop and walk your house to be sure everything
> >works. *The neat thing is that if you need a little better coverage,
> >just unplug the unit and move it to a different wall plug.
>
> >I've watched the owner be on the internet watching a video on his
> >laptop, his daughter streaming audio on her laptop and his wife using
> >webmail. *They have a std DSL connection (1.5mb/256kb) and the
> >internal home system works great for what they need, at the right
> >price point,,
>
> >hope it works for you the same way,
>
> >Bob
>
> >Robert Smith Consulting
> >Fort Bragg, California
>
> If the PDF doesn't make it through the news server, drop me an e-mail
> at
>
> na6t *at *na6t * dot * com * * * * * * * *
>
> and I'll send a copy to you,,
>
> Bob- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I certainly thank you for your recommendation and great info.
A pdf would be great via email.

Thanks
Patty

Peter Pan
03-27-08, 09:25 AM
pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:

>
> Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
> Ethernet.
>
> Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
> (recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
> Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
> (when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
> Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
>
> Thanks
> Patty

If you don't mind non seemless wireless routing (I don't and don't use it),
just pick up another linksys wrt54g at walmart (under $45, the gs is about
twice as much), plug the output from the netgear into the router part (not
the wan input), set as desired, don't now about your other stuff, but as I
recall you said you had tivo, and tivo only supports wep rather than any
other type of encryption... If you want wireless access to it change the
starting IP address to something different than the one you have (i use
192.168.1.200.... default is 192.168.1.1). I have the ssid's on mine mine
set to PPinMD-Private and PPinMD-Public (private uses wpa2, and public uses
wep)

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-27-08, 12:05 PM
On Mar 27, 10:25*am, "Peter Pan" <PeterPanNOS...@MarcAlanNOSPAM.info>
wrote:
> pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> > Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
> > Ethernet.
>
> > Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
> > (recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
> > Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
> > (when Penryns are fully deployed) *and streaming audio from PC to
> > Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
> > Thanks
> > Patty
>
> If you don't mind non seemless wireless routing (I don't and don't use it),
> just pick up another linksys wrt54g at walmart (under $45, the gs is about
> twice as much), plug the output from the netgear into the router part (not
> the wan input), set as desired, don't now about your other stuff, but as I
> recall you said you had tivo, and tivo only supports wep rather than any
> other type of encryption... If you want wireless access to it change the
> starting IP address to something different than the one you have (i use
> 192.168.1.200.... default is 192.168.1.1). I have the ssid's on mine mine
> set to PPinMD-Private and PPinMD-Public (private uses wpa2, and public uses
> wep)

Thanks
Patty

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-27-08, 01:06 PM
On Mar 27, 10:25*am, "Peter Pan" <PeterPanNOS...@MarcAlanNOSPAM.info>
wrote:
> pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> > Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router via
> > Ethernet.
>
> > Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
> > (recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
> > Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
> > (when Penryns are fully deployed) *and streaming audio from PC to
> > Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
> > Thanks
> > Patty
>
> If you don't mind non seamless wireless routing (I don't and don't use it),
> just pick up another Linksys wrt54g at Walmart (under $45, the gs is about
> twice as much), plug the output from the NetGear into the router part (not
> the wan input), set as desired, don't now about your other stuff, but as I
> recall you said you had TiVo, and TiVo only supports WEP rather than any
> other type of encryption... If you want wireless access to it change the
> starting IP address to something different than the one you have (i use
> 192.168.1.200.... default is 192.168.1.1). I have the ssid's on mine mine
> set to Pined-Private and Pined-Public (private uses wpa2, and public uses
> WEP)

To: Peter Pan,
Thanks,
Should I get a Wrt54g or GS instead of perhaps a Wireless AP?

I am a bit dumb when it comes to connecting a router to a router. I
know you can connect an N router to a G router so you have both
signals. But did not know I could plug in the Powerline into my
WRT54GS router and then on other end plug in another router.. thought
it had to be an access point (not sure what diff between an AP and a
router is actually).
And I guess I would have to change the IP of the router so I can
configure both of them when I get second one. How can I change the
login IP of one router from 192.168.1.1 to something else to access
admin panel? I know when you said 192.168.1.200, that is the starting
address I think of the IP's the router hands out...
Thanks
Patty

Peter Pan
03-27-08, 02:25 PM
pattyjamas@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mar 27, 10:25 am, "Peter Pan" <PeterPanNOS...@MarcAlanNOSPAM.info>
> wrote:
>> pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>> Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router
>>> via Ethernet.
>>
>>> Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
>>> (recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>>
>>> Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
>>> (when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
>>> Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Patty
>>
>> If you don't mind non seamless wireless routing (I don't and don't
>> use it), just pick up another Linksys wrt54g at Walmart (under $45,
>> the gs is about twice as much), plug the output from the NetGear
>> into the router part (not the wan input), set as desired, don't now
>> about your other stuff, but as I recall you said you had TiVo, and
>> TiVo only supports WEP rather than any other type of encryption...
>> If you want wireless access to it change the starting IP address to
>> something different than the one you have (i use 192.168.1.200....
>> default is 192.168.1.1). I have the ssid's on mine mine set to
>> Pined-Private and Pined-Public (private uses wpa2, and public uses
>> WEP)
>
> To: Peter Pan,
> Thanks,
> Should I get a Wrt54g or GS instead of perhaps a Wireless AP?
>
> I am a bit dumb when it comes to connecting a router to a router. I
> know you can connect an N router to a G router so you have both
> signals. But did not know I could plug in the Powerline into my
> WRT54GS router and then on other end plug in another router.. thought
> it had to be an access point (not sure what diff between an AP and a
> router is actually).
> And I guess I would have to change the IP of the router so I can
> configure both of them when I get second one. How can I change the
> login IP of one router from 192.168.1.1 to something else to access
> admin panel? I know when you said 192.168.1.200, that is the starting
> address I think of the IP's the router hands out...
> Thanks
> Patty

You can daisy chain routers (almost) all you want... The wrt thing is
actually both a wap (wireless access point) and a router in the same box,
sharing power/a wall wart.... no such thing as a technical difference
between n and g routers... If a salesman told you any different and his lips
were moving, he was probably lying (or training to be a politician :)

as for g or gs doesn't really matter, both work about the same for what you
want to do, just the g model (no s on the end) is cheaper (at walmart g is
48.88, gs is 78.96) up to you if you want to spend a few bucks more.

when you do the configuration on your new thing (or if you reset it cuz you
messed up), you can connect to it either wired or wireless, and in your
browser go to 192.168.1.1.... I would suggest use a cable for the initial
config and turn off wireless, you can also set the starting ip address for
the whole enchilada (it starts/resets to 192.168.1.1, since you already have
one device at that address i would set the second at 192.168.1.200 ), and if
you want you can also change the starting address for dhcp etc (don't mess
with that), Comes as a default of 4 addresses for the router part, and
default dhcp server provides 50 more.... oddly enuf, that adds up to the max
number of 254! (that's why I use 200, easy to remember and works out real
easy)

pattyjamas@gmail.com
03-27-08, 08:19 PM
On Mar 27, 3:25*pm, "Peter Pan" <PeterPanNOS...@MarcAlanNOSPAM.info>
wrote:
> pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
> > On Mar 27, 10:25 am, "Peter Pan" <PeterPanNOS...@MarcAlanNOSPAM.info>
> > wrote:
> >> pattyja...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> >>> Of course one side will be connected to my Linksys WRT54GS router
> >>> via Ethernet.
>
> >>> Is there a problem with putting perhaps a Wireless Access Point
> >>> (recommend one??) at the far end of the Powerline?
>
> >>> Will use for for internet web surfing on upcoming laptop purchase
> >>> (when Penryns are fully deployed) and streaming audio from PC to
> >>> Squeezebox unit to stereo.
>
> >>> Thanks
> >>> Patty
>
> >> If you don't mind non seamless wireless routing (I don't and don't
> >> use it), just pick up another Linksys wrt54g at Walmart (under $45,
> >> the gs is about twice as much), plug the output from the NetGear
> >> into the router part (not the wan input), set as desired, don't now
> >> about your other stuff, but as I recall you said you had TiVo, and
> >> TiVo only supports WEP rather than any other type of encryption...
> >> If you want wireless access to it change the starting IP address to
> >> something different than the one you have (i use 192.168.1.200....
> >> default is 192.168.1.1). I have the ssid's on mine mine set to
> >> Pined-Private and Pined-Public (private uses wpa2, and public uses
> >> WEP)
>
> > To: Peter Pan,
> > Thanks,
> > Should I get a Wrt54g or GS instead of perhaps a Wireless AP?
>
> > I am a bit dumb when it comes to connecting a router to a router. I
> > know you can connect an N router to a G router so you have both
> > signals. But did not know I could plug in the Powerline into my
> > WRT54GS router and then on other end plug in another router.. thought
> > it had to be an access point (not sure what diff between an AP and a
> > router is actually).
> > And I guess I would have to change the IP of the router so I can
> > configure both of them when I get second one. How can I change the
> > login IP of *one router from 192.168.1.1 to something else to access
> > admin panel? I know when you said 192.168.1.200, that is the starting
> > address I think of the IP's the router hands out...
> > Thanks
> > Patty
>
> You can daisy chain routers (almost) all you want... The wrt thing is
> actually both a wap (wireless access point) and a router in the same box,
> sharing power/a wall wart.... no such thing as a technical difference
> between n and g routers... If a salesman told you any different and his lips
> were moving, he was probably lying (or training to be a politician :)
>
> as for g or gs doesn't really matter, both work about the same for what you
> want to do, just the g model (no s on the end) is cheaper (at walmart g is
> 48.88, gs is 78.96) up to you if you want to spend a few bucks more.
>
> when you do the configuration on your new thing (or if you reset it cuz you
> messed up), you can connect to it either wired or wireless, and in your
> browser go to 192.168.1.1.... I would suggest use a cable for the initial
> config and turn off wireless, you can also set the starting ip address for
> the whole enchilada (it starts/resets to 192.168.1.1, since you already have
> one device at that address i would set the second at 192.168.1.200 ), and if
> you want you can also change the starting address for dhcp etc (don't mess
> with that), Comes as a default of 4 addresses for the router part, and
> default dhcp server provides 50 more.... oddly enuf, that adds up to the max
> number of 254! (that's why I use 200, easy to remember and works out real
> easy)- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thank you very much. I looked at my admin panel and found I could
indeed set the IP address of the router to other than 192.....1 and
can change starting IP addresses. I sued to read this stuff about
using WRT-DD firmware upgrades, setting router as a bridge and all
that jazz. No need to get a router made as an AP or Bridge or whatever
you want to call it. You set me straight on this about daisy-chaining.

I thank you much
Excellent.



Thanks
Patty

seaweedsl
03-28-08, 11:18 AM
I suggest that if you get a Linksys WRT54G, spend the extra money and
get the GL. The newer versions of the plain G are worse and worse.
The antenna is not replacable anymore except on the GL.

The GL will work much better for switching over to DD-WRT if you ever
decide to do that.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833124190


As for using routers as AP, most any will do that, not just the
Linksys. See: http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To#Use_a_wireless_router_as_a_wireless_access_point

Note,: you will NOT need a crossover cable with a modern router.


Steve