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P.Schuman
03-23-08, 01:02 AM
I was using my laptop to review my DSL modem stats
by hooking up a small hub on the WAN connection
between the DSL modem and my router.
(disable Wifi & enable Ethernet)
The DSL modem lives at 10.0.0.1,
so I setup my static IP info on the Ethernet connection for that - all works
fine

BUT - I was thinking -
would there be a way to have both the Ethernet @ 10.0.0.xx
and the WiFi @ 192.168.1.xx active at the same time...
Running XP/SP2

If I use the browser.... how would it know which interface to use
for an entered IP address or to be resolved DNS name ?

Jeff Liebermann
03-23-08, 01:44 AM
On Sun, 23 Mar 2008 06:02:28 GMT, "P.Schuman"
<pschuman_NO_SPAM_ME@interserv.com> wrote:

>I was using my laptop to review my DSL modem stats
>by hooking up a small hub on the WAN connection
>between the DSL modem and my router.

That works and what I do sometimes. You have to use a hub, not an
ethernet switch.

>(disable Wifi & enable Ethernet)

Huh? Why? Wi-Fi and ethernet can coexist on most routers.

>The DSL modem lives at 10.0.0.1,

OK.

>so I setup my static IP info on the Ethernet connection for that - all works
>fine

OK.

>BUT - I was thinking -
>would there be a way to have both the Ethernet @ 10.0.0.xx
>and the WiFi @ 192.168.1.xx active at the same time...
>Running XP/SP2

Yep, but it's a bit ugly. If you go to:
Control Panel -> Network -> Ethernet Device -> Properties -> Advanced
you'll find that you can assign two or more IP addresses and two or
more gateway IP's to the interface. Assign 10.0.0.2 as a 2nd
interface. I don't think you have to assign 10.0.0.1 as a gateway,
but try it anyway. In effect, you'll have a dual IP network setup.

The way I like to do it is to install a 2nd ethernet card in my
desktop. You would set it up with a static IP on 10.0.0.2 with a
gateway of 10.0.0.1. No DNS servers. Netmask is 255.255.255.0

>If I use the browser.... how would it know which interface to use
>for an entered IP address or to be resolved DNS name ?

Ummm.... I dunno. I think the routing table can figure out where the
packets are suppose to go.
Start -> run -> cmd <enter>
route print | more

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

P.Schuman
03-23-08, 11:34 AM
Here's the followup...

The DSL modem has an internal address of 10.0.0.1
and normally is just a DSL bridge with the router
actually performing all the PPPoE functions....
The DSL modem is not a router.

I've taken the WAN connection cable from my router
that normally connects to the DSL modem
and plugged it into a temp hub to gain access to the stats.
So - this temp hub has 3 connections.... (non-routed)
DSL modem - Ethernet connection
Router - WAN connection
Laptop - Ethernet connection

this works fine,
and I can bring up http://10.0.0.1 on the laptop browser
and see all the stats: DSL, ATM, Eth, and log

Next - today - I re-enabled the laptop WiFi
to see if I could have them both active...

So - I have the browser open with -> http://10.0.0.1/atmstats.html
Remember this is just a hard coded internal address for the DSL modem
and there is no routing paths beyond this since our local network is 192.xx

I open a browser tab and enter -> http://192.168.1.2
and yup - the router logon page is displayed.
So - with entering 192.xx - it figures out to use the WiFi connection
since we are on the same 192.xx segment as our WiFi IP address.

Next - try a DNS address.... nope - doesn't work -
There is no way for the dual IP stacks to figure out which interface to send the
request.
I can't use the real DNS addresses on the Ethernet 10.xx side,
since there is no routing going on that side.
The WiFi side has all the required info and routing,
but there is no way to give one IP stack "priority" over the other IP stack.

But at least now I can see the DSL modem stats AND the router log at the same
time
by entering their IP addresses in the browser.

P.Schuman
03-23-08, 11:49 AM
"P.Schuman" <pschuman_NO_SPAM_ME@interserv.com> wrote in message
news:vEvFj.16323$5K1.3432@newssvr12.news.prodigy.net...
> Here's the followup...
>
> The DSL modem has an internal address of 10.0.0.1
> and normally is just a DSL bridge with the router
> actually performing all the PPPoE functions....
> The DSL modem is not a router.
>
> I've taken the WAN connection cable from my router
> that normally connects to the DSL modem
> and plugged it into a temp hub to gain access to the stats.
> So - this temp hub has 3 connections.... (non-routed)
> DSL modem - Ethernet connection
> Router - WAN connection
> Laptop - Ethernet connection
>
> this works fine,
> and I can bring up http://10.0.0.1 on the laptop browser
> and see all the stats: DSL, ATM, Eth, and log

just a nit - for complete diary....
to get the laptop to "see" the 10.xx address,
of the Speedstream 5100a DSL modem/bridge,
I have to manually create an ARP entry for it on the laptop.
Using a command prompt window on the laptop...
arp -a (to see what's there - nothing)
arp -s 10.0.0.1 00-0b-23-13-20-5c (the MAC of the DSL modem)
arp -a
ping 10.0.0.1

> Next - today - I re-enabled the laptop WiFi
> to see if I could have them both active...
>
> So - I have the browser open with -> http://10.0.0.1/atmstats.html
> Remember this is just a hard coded internal address for the DSL modem
> and there is no routing paths beyond this since our local network is 192.xx
>
> I open a browser tab and enter -> http://192.168.1.2
> and yup - the router logon page is displayed.
> So - with entering 192.xx - it figures out to use the WiFi connection
> since we are on the same 192.xx segment as our WiFi IP address.
>
> Next - try a DNS address.... nope - doesn't work -
> There is no way for the dual IP stacks to figure out which interface to send
the
> request.
> I can't use the real DNS addresses on the Ethernet 10.xx side,
> since there is no routing going on that side.
> The WiFi side has all the required info and routing,
> but there is no way to give one IP stack "priority" over the other IP stack.
>
> But at least now I can see the DSL modem stats AND the router log at the same
> time
> by entering their IP addresses in the browser.
>
>

Charles J
08-05-08, 01:51 AM
On Sun, 23 Mar 2008 16:34:35 GMT, "P.Schuman"
<pschuman_NO_SPAM_ME@interserv.com> wrote:

>Here's the followup...
>
>The DSL modem has an internal address of 10.0.0.1
>and normally is just a DSL bridge with the router
>actually performing all the PPPoE functions....
>The DSL modem is not a router.
>
>I've taken the WAN connection cable from my router
>that normally connects to the DSL modem
>and plugged it into a temp hub to gain access to the stats.
>So - this temp hub has 3 connections.... (non-routed)
> DSL modem - Ethernet connection
> Router - WAN connection
> Laptop - Ethernet connection
>
>this works fine,
>and I can bring up http://10.0.0.1 on the laptop browser
>and see all the stats: DSL, ATM, Eth, and log
>
>Next - today - I re-enabled the laptop WiFi
>to see if I could have them both active...

Of course you can have both of them active.

>So - I have the browser open with -> http://10.0.0.1/atmstats.html
>Remember this is just a hard coded internal address for the DSL modem
>and there is no routing paths beyond this since our local network is 192.xx
>
>I open a browser tab and enter -> http://192.168.1.2
>and yup - the router logon page is displayed.
>So - with entering 192.xx - it figures out to use the WiFi connection
>since we are on the same 192.xx segment as our WiFi IP address.

Standard routing table stuff.

>Next - try a DNS address.... nope - doesn't work -
>There is no way for the dual IP stacks to figure out which interface to send the
>request.

Single IP stack, dual interfaces. The problem you were having is that
the default metric for wired interfaces is higher than the default
metric for wireless interfaces, so your request to reach an address on
the Internet went out the 10.x interface, where it was black holed.
Simply go to a Command Prompt and use the 'route' command to give the
wireless interface a lower metric than the wired interface.

To display your routing table, use 'route print'. To change an entry
in the table, use the 'route change' command. Use 'route /?' to see
the proper syntax.

>I can't use the real DNS addresses on the Ethernet 10.xx side,
>since there is no routing going on that side.
>The WiFi side has all the required info and routing,
>but there is no way to give one IP stack "priority" over the other IP stack.

Yes, there is a way. That's the purpose of the 'metric' variable,
described above.

>But at least now I can see the DSL modem stats AND the router log at the same
>time
>by entering their IP addresses in the browser.

You should be able to see the DSL modem stats, the router log, and
access the Internet, all at the same time.