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JustA MereUser
03-16-08, 03:45 PM
Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are connected
to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough, you
can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
does not mean nomadic.

JustA MereUser
03-16-08, 05:03 PM
JustA MereUser wrote:
> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are connected
> to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
> hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
> certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
> set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough, you
> can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
> work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
> does not mean nomadic.

In fact, even if you stay in the range of the *same* access point, you can't
even pull out the card to save power until you need to connect. Or rather, you
can, but you need to reset the card. Twice. That means pulling it out again,
waiting 30 seconds and pushing it in. It seems to work better if the monitor is
running when you do this (this is Win2K, not XP). Of course, this has never
been conclusively repeatable. It's a bit like arcane incantations. Get cat gut
on a full moon, do a shaky-shaky around in a circle, waving the card in your
other hand. And if the constellations are aligned, you might get lucky.

DTC
03-16-08, 05:16 PM
JustA MereUser wrote:
> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are connected
> to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
> hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
> certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
> set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough, you
> can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
> work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
> does not mean nomadic.

As I understand it, you have a working internet connection and then
hibernate your laptop and resume your work and internet connection
at another location (wireless access point).

If this is correct, then what you are experience is very normal. Its
NOT a Linksys card issue. You are simply not correctly connecting
to the new access point.

Usually the best way to do what you want is keep the wireless connection
set for dynamic IP and server assigned DNS. That way it solves a lot
of problems.

Jeff Liebermann
03-16-08, 07:25 PM
On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 16:45:23 -0400, JustA MereUser
<JustA.MereUser@gmail.com> wrote:

>Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are connected
>to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found".

What does IPCONFIG say?
Start -> run -> cmd <enter>
IPCONFIG

>All sorts of
>hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,

Yep. Wireless is magic.

>certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
>set).

Incidentally, you can get into that situation by setting your wireless
client to connect to ANY access point. I've lost count of how many
users complain about not being able to maintain a connection, only to
find that they're connected to the neighbors access point. Of course,
they don't have the correct WPA key, so the client says "connected but
no internet", which is what you're getting. If you want to complain,
yell at Microsoft for not including connection progress messages, and
Linksys for following in Microsoft's footsteps.

>The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough, you
>can eventually connect.

Yep. If you roll the dice enough, you might eventually connect to
your own access point.

>Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
>work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
>does not mean nomadic.

Hibernation is another horror story. It can wait as I'm busy scraping
the rust off a very used drill press and needed a break from the
fumes.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

P.Schuman
03-18-08, 08:17 PM
JustA MereUser wrote:
> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You
> are connected to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found".
> All sorts of hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly
> configured routers, certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP
> (even if they are properly set). The real solution, at least in some
> cases, is if you reboot enough, you can eventually connect. Isn't
> that wonderful? So much for hibernating your work in the middle of
> something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless does not
> mean nomadic.

I've found that with my internal mini-PCI card in my Dell C610 laptop,
if I go to sleep, and then wake up - the WiFi is "iffy"...
I don't think my card gets properly re-started, and therefore, re-connected.
In my case, the latest Bios doesn't recognize the later card...and probably
doesn't know it's there.
Sometimes, I can do a "repair" or a "disable/enable" and it works -
sometimes it doesn't.

JustA.MereUser@gmail.com
03-22-08, 09:13 PM
On Mar 16, 6:16 pm, DTC <m...@nothingtoseehere.zzx> wrote:
> JustA MereUser wrote:
> > Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are connected
> > to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
> > hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
> > certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
> > set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough, you
> > can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
> > work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
> > does not mean nomadic.
>
> As I understand it, you have a working internet connection and then
> hibernate your laptop and resume your work and internet connection
> at another location (wireless access point).
>
> If this is correct, then what you are experience is very normal. Its
> NOT a Linksys card issue. You are simply not correctly connecting
> to the new access point.
>
> Usually the best way to do what you want is keep the wireless connection
> set for dynamic IP and server assigned DNS. That way it solves a lot
> of problems.

Actually, it's not just after resumption from hibernation. It also
runs into problems when disconnecting from one access point and trying
to access another. Need to reboot, often more than once.

The mobile is set to DHCP, and the IP address is not always easy to
know ahead of time, especially in public acess points.

DaveBl
03-22-08, 09:51 PM
"JustA MereUser" <JustA.MereUser@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:frk16v$fd2$1@aioe.org...
Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are
connected
to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough,
you
can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys,
wireless
does not mean nomadic.

====================================================
I had the same problem with the same adapter on a Win 2000 machine. I
removed the adapter and uninstalled the files associated with it, rebooted
pluggen the adapter and installed the driver from the cd. last I installed
the monitor program from the CD , and it has worked perfectly ever since. I
know it goes against the instructions supplied with the adapter BUT, hey, it
worked perfect
Dave

JustA.MereUser@gmail.com
03-22-08, 10:06 PM
Please see correction below.

On Mar 22, 10:13 pm, JustA.MereU...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mar 16, 6:16 pm, DTC <m...@nothingtoseehere.zzx> wrote:
>> JustA MereUser wrote:
>>> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get
>>> "You are connected to the access point, but the Internet
>>> cannot be found". All sorts of hocus-pocus on the internet
>>> about malware, improperly configured routers, certain
>>> encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are
>>> properly set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is
>>> if you reboot enough, you can eventually connect. Isn't that
>>> wonderful? So much for hibernating your work in the middle
>>> of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
>>> does not mean nomadic.
>
>> As I understand it, you have a working internet connection and
>> then hibernate your laptop and resume your work and internet
>> connection at another location (wireless access point).
>
>> If this is correct, then what you are experience is very
>> normal. Its NOT a Linksys card issue. You are simply not
>> correctly connecting to the new access point.
>
>> Usually the best way to do what you want is keep the wireless
>> connection set for dynamic IP and server assigned DNS. That
>> way it solves a lot of problems.
>
> Actually, it's not just after resumption from hibernation. It
> also runs into problems when disconnecting from one access
> point and trying to access another. Need to reboot, often more
> than once.

Correction. The WPC54G's "monitor" application does not have an
option to disconnect. However, the same flaky connectivity
occurs when trying to switch access points, regardless of whether
one hibernates and resumes. I have found that it "sometimes"
works to simply pull the card and push it back in.

> The mobile is set to DHCP, and the IP address is not always
> easy to know ahead of time, especially in public acess points.

As well, in going through the steps to set up the profile for an
access point, I have not encountered the option of specifying
server assigned DNS. However, logging in as admin and going to
Start->Settings->NetworkAndDialupConnections->LocalAreaConnection4(the
WPC54G)->Properties->TCP/IP_properties shows that DHCP is set, as
well as DNS being automatically obtained from the network.

Since I'm griping, I might as well throw in another complaint.
Why on earth would "monitor" GUI be designed so you can only see
the leading part of the fields, including SSID? You can never be
sure what you're connecting to, which is kind of disconcerting
since you're entering in the password. Normally, when you can't
see the entire field, there is a way to scroll the date.

JustA.MereUser@gmail.com
03-22-08, 10:20 PM
On Mar 16, 8:25 pm, Jeff Liebermann <je...@cruzio.com> wrote:
> On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 16:45:23 -0400, JustA MereUser
>>Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get
>>"You are connected to the access point, but the Internet
>>cannot be found".
>
> What does IPCONFIG say? Start -> run -> cmd <enter> IPCONFIG

I can't duplicate the access problems right now despite switching
access points. However, from memory, the IP address (and other
addresses) are sometimes nonsensical, consisting of some
combination of zeros and 255's. Other times, the IP address
won't change from the old access point. Not that it necessarily
should, since the new access point could very well serve out the
same address. There are sometimes, too, when the IP address
doesn't look blatanly pathological, but takes on a value that is
very typical of a nonworking condition (which I can't recall
right now). When the connection *does* work, the IP address is
always close to 192.168.1.64. I believe the last value changes
dependin on whether there is more than one device connecting the
access point.

>>All sorts of hocus-pocus on the internet about malware,
>>improperly configured routers,
>
> Yep. Wireless is magic.
>
>>certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if
>>they are properly set).
>
> Incidentally, you can get into that situation by setting your
> wireless client to connect to ANY access point. I've lost
> count of how many users complain about not being able to
> maintain a connection, only to find that they're connected to
> the neighbors access point. Of course, they don't have the
> correct WPA key, so the client says "connected but no
> internet", which is what you're getting. If you want to
> complain, yell at Microsoft for not including connection
> progress messages, and Linksys for following in Microsoft's
> footsteps.

That isn't the case here. I think you can set to connect to any
access point in Windows XP, but I'm using the WPC54G's "monitor"
application, and I've always had to explicitly connect to a
specific access point.

>>The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot
>>enough, you can eventually connect.
>
> Yep. If you roll the dice enough, you might eventually connect
> to your own access point.

Like I said, it doesn't look like randomly connecting to access
points is the case here

>>Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your work in
>>the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys,
>>wireless does not mean nomadic.
>
> Hibernation is another horror story. It can wait as I'm busy
> scraping the rust off a very used drill press and needed a
> break from the fumes.

Yes, hibernation has its problems, but the same issues arise
when I simply change access points without hibernating.

JustA.MereUser@gmail.com
03-22-08, 10:21 PM
On Mar 18, 9:17 pm, "P.Schuman" <pschuman_no_spam...@interserv.com>
wrote:
> JustA MereUser wrote:
> > Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You
> > are connected to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found".
> > All sorts of hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly
> > configured routers, certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP
> > (even if they are properly set). The real solution, at least in some
> > cases, is if you reboot enough, you can eventually connect. Isn't
> > that wonderful? So much for hibernating your work in the middle of
> > something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless does not
> > mean nomadic.
>
> I've found that with my internal mini-PCI card in my Dell C610 laptop,
> if I go to sleep, and then wake up - the WiFi is "iffy"...
> I don't think my card gets properly re-started, and therefore, re-connected.
> In my case, the latest Bios doesn't recognize the later card...and probably
> doesn't know it's there.
> Sometimes, I can do a "repair" or a "disable/enable" and it works -
> sometimes it doesn't.

I find it problematic even switching access points without necessarily
hibernating and re-awakening. Sometimes, it helps to pull the card,
wait for a minute, and reinsert. However, it might take a few tries.

JustA.MereUser@gmail.com
03-22-08, 10:23 PM
On Mar 22, 10:51 pm, "DaveBl" <fallgu...@verizon.net> wrote:
> "JustA MereUser" <JustA.MereU...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:frk16v$fd2$1@aioe.org...
> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are
> connected
> to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
> hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
> certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
> set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough,
> you
> can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
> work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys,
> wireless
> does not mean nomadic.
>
> ====================================================
> I had the same problem with the same adapter on a Win 2000 machine. I
> removed the adapter and uninstalled the files associated with it, rebooted
> pluggen the adapter and installed the driver from the cd. last I installed
> the monitor program from the CD , and it has worked perfectly ever since. I
> know it goes against the instructions supplied with the adapter BUT, hey, it
> worked perfect
> Dave

Hmm. OK. Thanks. I'll have to keep that trick up my sleeve for when
I get fed up with the current symptoms. Thanks mucho.

JustA.MereUser@gmail.com
03-22-08, 11:32 PM
On Mar 22, 11:06 pm, JustA.MereU...@gmail.com wrote:
> Please see correction below.
>
> On Mar 22, 10:13 pm, JustA.MereU...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>
>> On Mar 16, 6:16 pm, DTC <m...@nothingtoseehere.zzx> wrote:
>>> JustA MereUser wrote:
>>>> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly
>>>> get "You are connected to the access point, but the Internet
>>>> cannot be found". All sorts of hocus-pocus on the internet
>>>> about malware, improperly configured routers, certain
>>>> encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are
>>>> properly set). The real solution, at least in some cases,
>>>> is if you reboot enough, you can eventually connect. Isn't
>>>> that wonderful? So much for hibernating your work in the
>>>> middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys,
>>>> wireless does not mean nomadic.
>
>>> As I understand it, you have a working internet connection
>>> and then hibernate your laptop and resume your work and
>>> internet connection at another location (wireless access
>>> point).
>
>>> If this is correct, then what you are experience is very
>>> normal. Its NOT a Linksys card issue. You are simply not
>>> correctly connecting to the new access point.
>
>>> Usually the best way to do what you want is keep the wireless
>>> connection set for dynamic IP and server assigned DNS. That
>>> way it solves a lot of problems.
>
>> Actually, it's not just after resumption from hibernation. It
>> also runs into problems when disconnecting from one access
>> point and trying to access another. Need to reboot, often
>> more than once.
>
> Correction. The WPC54G's "monitor" application does not have
> an option to disconnect. However, the same flaky connectivity
> occurs when trying to switch access points, regardless of
> whether one hibernates and resumes. I have found that it
> "sometimes" works to simply pull the card and push it back in.
>
>> The mobile is set to DHCP, and the IP address is not always
>> easy to know ahead of time, especially in public acess points.
>
> As well, in going through the steps to set up the profile for
> an access point, I have not encountered the option of
> specifying server assigned DNS. However, logging in as admin
> and going to
> Start->Settings->NetworkAndDialupConnections->LocalAreaConnection4(the
> WPC54G)->Properties->TCP/IP_properties shows that DHCP is set,
> as well as DNS being automatically obtained from the network.
>
> Since I'm griping, I might as well throw in another complaint.
> Why on earth would "monitor" GUI be designed so you can only
> see the leading part of the fields, including SSID? You can
> never be sure what you're connecting to, which is kind of
> disconcerting since you're entering in the password. Normally,
> when you can't see the entire field, there is a way to scroll
> the date.

This is getting hard to understand. The card is about 2 feet
away from the access point, yet it doesn't show up in the list of
access points. With enough refreshes, it evetually shows up with
100% signal strength. Bizzarre.....

HT Smith
03-29-08, 08:13 PM
In article <frk16v$fd2$1@aioe.org>, JustA.MereUser@gmail.com says...
> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are connected
> to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
> hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
> certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are properly
> set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot enough, you
> can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating your
> work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys, wireless
> does not mean nomadic.
>
============

Hello,

I've found with hardware over the past 25 years that the majority of
times it works as designed.
Perhaps some users are asking for functionality that wasn't by design.
Check your computer settings. Every piece of Linksys I've ever purchased
works as it is supposed to.
If I find there is something I feel isn't correct I recheck my works
first. Most of the time it's a "picnic" -- that is Problem In Chair Not
In Computer!

Harrison Stepter's ghost
03-30-08, 11:41 AM
"HT Smith" <htr@icerocket.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.22589705b4c58d9a989680@news.bresnan.net...
> In article <frk16v$fd2$1@aioe.org>, JustA.MereUser@gmail.com says...
>> Linksys WPC54G wireless card on Windows 2000. Repeatedly get "You are
>> connected
>> to the access point, but the Internet cannot be found". All sorts of
>> hocus-pocus on the internet about malware, improperly configured routers,
>> certain encryptions selections, the need for DHCP (even if they are
>> properly
>> set). The real solution, at least in some cases, is if you reboot
>> enough, you
>> can eventually connect. Isn't that wonderful? So much for hibernating
>> your
>> work in the middle of something and resuming elsewhere. For linksys,
>> wireless
>> does not mean nomadic.
>>
> ============
>
> Hello,
>
> I've found with hardware over the past 25 years that the majority of
> times it works as designed.
> Perhaps some users are asking for functionality that wasn't by design.
> Check your computer settings. Every piece of Linksys I've ever purchased
> works as it is supposed to.
> If I find there is something I feel isn't correct I recheck my works
> first. Most of the time it's a "picnic" -- that is Problem In Chair Not
> In Computer!


Yeah...they work as advertised,,,but for a limited time only!