PDA

View Full Version : [linux] Linksys USB Wireless-N adapter Actually finds Lesser Count ofWireless Networks than my Laptop's Internal Network Card's Antenna



mutantspacebatsofdoom@gmail.com
03-15-08, 07:01 AM
My Wireless Network USB Adapter used to find the same number as my
laptop's built-in network card. I have been running this Backtrack
Live OS from a USB. But after my manipulation of the construct to boot
this Backtrack OS from harddisk, my wireless USB adapter finds less
than half the amount than before, whereas my laptop built-in wireless
card still sees all of them.

Now I want that linksys usb thing to behave just as my laptop built-in
wireless card!

I will sacrifice small mannons for help!

Thank you,
J

Peter Pan
03-15-08, 09:43 PM
mutantspacebatsofdoom@gmail.com wrote:
> My Wireless Network USB Adapter used to find the same number as my
> laptop's built-in network card. I have been running this Backtrack
> Live OS from a USB. But after my manipulation of the construct to boot
> this Backtrack OS from harddisk, my wireless USB adapter finds less
> than half the amount than before, whereas my laptop built-in wireless
> card still sees all of them.
>
> Now I want that linksys usb thing to behave just as my laptop built-in
> wireless card!
>
> I will sacrifice small mannons for help!
>
> Thank you,
> J

Couple of things, n usually provides no speed or range increase over b/g,
the only time it seems to be greater is when the salesmen mouths are moving,
or the ad people are wriing lies......
Second, the built in wireless card uses an antenna bult into the lid of the
laptop, while a usb dongle has a little teeny tiny thing inside the dongle,
or even the external usb devices have multiple/mimo/diversity/antennas,
which can't be changed, and are usually the cheapest things the manufacturer
can get away with, as you can see, don't work very good in most instnces

Bottom line, there are **NO** n standards yet, so if you bought anything
with it's snake oil charlatin claims of bigger/better/more range/faster/etc,
you got robbed....

mutantspacebatsofdoom@gmail.com
03-16-08, 05:38 AM
On 16 mrt, 03:43, "Peter Pan" <PeterPanNOS...@MarcAlanNOSPAM.info>
wrote:
> mutantspacebatsofd...@gmail.com wrote:
> > My Wireless Network USB Adapter used to find the same number as my
> > laptop's built-in network card. I have been running this Backtrack
> > Live OS from a USB. But after my manipulation of the construct to boot
> > this Backtrack OS from harddisk, my wireless USB adapter finds less
> > than half the amount than before, whereas my laptop built-in wireless
> > card still sees all of them.
>
> > Now I want that linksys usb thing to behave just as my laptop built-in
> > wireless card!
>
> > I will sacrifice small mannons for help!
>
> > Thank you,
> > J
>
> Couple of things, n usually provides no speed or range increase over b/g,
> the only time it seems to be greater is when the salesmen mouths are moving,
> or the ad people are wriing lies......
> Second, the built in wireless card uses an antenna bult into the lid of the
> laptop, while a usb dongle has a little teeny tiny thing inside the dongle,
> or even the external usb devices have multiple/mimo/diversity/antennas,
> which can't be changed, and are usually the cheapest things the manufacturer
> can get away with, as you can see, don't work very good in most instnces
>
> Bottom line, there are **NO** n standards yet, so if you bought anything
> with it's snake oil charlatin claims of bigger/better/more range/faster/etc,
> you got robbed....

Jah. Question is, why was USB-thing behavior _different_, _before_ I
pumped that Linux OS unto the harddrive?

Well...?

J.

LR
03-16-08, 07:27 AM
mutantspacebatsofdoom@gmail.com wrote:
> Jah. Question is, why was USB-thing behavior _different_, _before_ I
> pumped that Linux OS unto the harddrive?
>
> Well...?
>
> J.
>
Given the lack of information regarding the model and version of the
Linksys device, which version of BT you used(BT3 beta?), does it use the
same driver on the hard drive as it did from the USB, whether you still
get all the wireless networks if you try booting BT from the USB again ,
you would be better off asking on the appropriate BT forum.
http://forums.remote-exploit.org/index.php

Peter Pan
03-16-08, 12:58 PM
mutantspacebatsofdoom@gmail.com wrote:
>
> Jah. Question is, why was USB-thing behavior _different_, _before_ I
> pumped that Linux OS unto the harddrive?
>
> Well...?
>
> J.

Hard to say, but the driver takes the signal/noise ratio, creates a cutoff
number (n), and says display it if it is higher than n, and don't display it
if it is less than n... the value of n probably changed with different
drivers/os's......

ever play with something like say netstumbler? It will show a lot of AP's,
but many are way too weak of a signal to connect too, many of which will
show in netstumbler, but not in the various wifi programs used by the os to
display (since they are too weak to connect to)...... so you can see that
the program determines what is displayed and what isn't... Sounds like the
linux driver/program just isn't bothering to show ap's that are too weak to
connect to.

If you extend that signal strength/noise argument to the antennas in the lid
of a laptop/usb dongle, that too will change the signal/noise ratio...

To specifically answer your q, it is a different program/driver with
linux/windows, and has different cutoff numbers (what shows/what doesn't...
ie one may show -80 and the other may show -79)

Are you losing the display of ap's that you use/know have a good signal, or
just marginal ones?