PDA

View Full Version : Wan port ??



steve
01-29-08, 09:53 AM
I'm confused when to use a wan port on a router.

I have a small network.

One router is set up as DHCP. It gives out IP addresses. (I think this
is what you would call our gateway.)
We have a windows 2003 server to do authentication of users and DNS.

I have several routers and switches around the buildings. Some
wireless.

I'm asuming that all the routers (accept for the one coming in from
the outside world) should be connected to the standard ports, And that
the wan port should be left with nothing plugged into it if it is
inside the network. Basically Im just using the routers to continue
the network into multiple devces, printers computer.

Is that right ??

Thanks.

David H. Lipman
01-29-08, 03:05 PM
From: "steve" <stevesemple@lycos.com>

| I'm confused when to use a wan port on a router.
|
| I have a small network.
|
| One router is set up as DHCP. It gives out IP addresses. (I think this
| is what you would call our gateway.)
| We have a windows 2003 server to do authentication of users and DNS.
|
| I have several routers and switches around the buildings. Some
| wireless.
|
| I'm asuming that all the routers (accept for the one coming in from
| the outside world) should be connected to the standard ports, And that
| the wan port should be left with nothing plugged into it if it is
| inside the network. Basically Im just using the routers to continue
| the network into multiple devces, printers computer.
|
| Is that right ??
|
| Thanks.

WAN ports connect to the Internet.

LAN ports connect to all LAN side computers, print servers, game platforms, etc.

If you have Ethernet Switches/Hubs there is no need to use a Router.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp

steve
01-29-08, 03:24 PM
> If you have Ethernet Switches/Hubs there is no need to use a Router.
>
> --
> Davehttp://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
> Multi-AV -http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp

Thanks.

However (I know Im going to say this and people are going to say sure
there are BUT) One of the reasons we use several routers is because
we have wifi, I dont suppose there are wireless switches, or at least
I dont recall seeing them. ?

So then we put in a few Wireless routers and then connect some
Physical computers and even another wireless router to that wireless
router ports. (not wan) If thats right.

Regards

David H. Lipman
01-29-08, 03:28 PM
From: "steve" <stevesemple@lycos.com>


|
| Thanks.
|
| However (I know Im going to say this and people are going to say sure
| there are BUT) One of the reasons we use several routers is because
| we have wifi, I dont suppose there are wireless switches, or at least
| I dont recall seeing them. ?
|
| So then we put in a few Wireless routers and then connect some
| Physical computers and even another wireless router to that wireless
| router ports. (not wan) If thats right.
|
| Regards
|

No. Use a WireLess Access Point connected to a LAN port or use one Router with both LAN
ports and WireLess capabilities.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp

steve
01-29-08, 03:42 PM
>
> No. *Use a WireLess Access Point connected to a LAN port or use one Router with both LAN
> ports and WireLess capabilities.

So the wireless access point is just basiclly an interface to the
network with wep or whatever etc security. Yes thats a good Idea. Do
they do the switching?

regards

News Reader
03-25-08, 07:23 PM
I think your core confusion is that you are not recognizing that this is
a multi function device.

What you possess are routers with integrated switches. Normally these
would be separate devices with separate functions.

You are using the integrated switch (LAN ports) to extend your switched
network.

If you need routing functionality, you use a LAN port connected to one
network, and the WAN port connected to a different network.

The two networks use different IP address space.

When a host needs to connect to a resource on another system, it applies
the network mask to it's own IP address, and the IP address of the
destination resource, and then compares the results to determine whether
the destination resource is on the local LAN, or another LAN.

If the resource is on the local LAN, a router is not needed. The packets
are framed with the MAC address of the destination resource and placed
on the wire.

If the resource is on another LAN, the host needs the assistance of a
router. The packet is forwarded to the router, the router then uses its
knowledge of adjacent routers to determine the next hop. One router
passes data to the next, and so on, and so on, until it reaches a router
directly connected to the LAN where the destination host resides.

Your host would frame the packet with the MAC address of the router's
LAN interface. When that router places the packet onto the WAN, it is
framed with the MAC address of the next hop router.

Forgetting about issues such as NAT for a moment, the source and
destination IP addresses in the IP header remain the same as the packet
traverses the Internet. However, the source and destination MAC
addresses with which the packet is framed are constantly changing hop by
hop.

Two devices on the same segment use the Address Resolution Protocol
(ARP) to resolve an IP address into the MAC address needed to forward
the traffic. Communication occurs at Layer 2 (MAC). IP addresses are
logical, they really exist to facilitate getting from one network to
another.

Best Regards,
News Reader

steve wrote:
> I'm confused when to use a wan port on a router.
>
> I have a small network.
>
> One router is set up as DHCP. It gives out IP addresses. (I think this
> is what you would call our gateway.)
> We have a windows 2003 server to do authentication of users and DNS.
>
> I have several routers and switches around the buildings. Some
> wireless.
>
> I'm asuming that all the routers (accept for the one coming in from
> the outside world) should be connected to the standard ports, And that
> the wan port should be left with nothing plugged into it if it is
> inside the network. Basically Im just using the routers to continue
> the network into multiple devces, printers computer.
>
> Is that right ??
>
> Thanks.
>