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David
04-22-07, 11:21 PM
What kind of mileage can be expected from the latest series of diesel pickups. The GMC 2500HD looks interesting with the duramax 6.6l......

damn the premium for these motors

YARDofSTUF
04-23-07, 03:06 AM
From what I've read on a couple car forums, think 10MPG.

fastchevy
04-23-07, 12:24 PM
Duramax will be about 17-20mpg.

David
04-23-07, 04:37 PM
Duramax will be about 17-20mpg.

I heard something like that, but wanted verification. Supposedly a very strong and reliable.

fastchevy
04-23-07, 04:57 PM
I heard something like that, but wanted verification. Supposedly a very strong and reliable.

Yeah I've never owned one myself, their reputation is better than the cummins diesel and cummins used to be the one to beat.

Joe
04-23-07, 06:20 PM
Every diesel (newer) I have ever driven hovered around 20mpg empty on the highway. With a chip I think you can increase that.-- Powerstrokes, cummins, duramax....

De Plano
04-23-07, 09:10 PM
4X or 2X? Pretty big difference in the two

Chris
04-24-07, 07:58 AM
20mpg will be the average empty, I've seen them get as high as 25 with a full load, 2x or 4 x, not much dif in milage
You need to chip a oil burner right outa the box, and second make them breath, K&N, cut out the air box, and exhaust if you can afford it.
Now if your not going to work it hard, i highly recomend " NOT " getting a diesel, they tend to break alot if they are used as coasters, they need to be worked, and worked hard

David
04-24-07, 11:34 PM
20mpg will be the average empty, I've seen them get as high as 25 with a full load, 2x or 4 x, not much dif in milage
You need to chip a oil burner right outa the box, and second make them breath, K&N, cut out the air box, and exhaust if you can afford it.
Now if your not going to work it hard, i highly recomend " NOT " getting a diesel, they tend to break alot if they are used as coasters, they need to be worked, and worked hard

I was under the impression that the engines themselves were quite sturdy, if well maintained. It is the slacker would thinks 12 quarts of oil needs to be changed every 30,000 miles that has problems.

Chris
04-25-07, 08:09 AM
I was under the impression that the engines themselves were quite sturdy, .
The engines are quite sturdy, when they are " WORKED ".
I'm in the RV business, and we have over 400,000 on our 2001 f350, not uncommon, yet I see people who drive diesels as dailey grocery getters who are having engines replaced because they are not being worked.
Trucks that are on their 3rd motor in 60,000 miles, the same motor we have over 400,000 on
Short tripping kills diesels, They need to be heated up to run right,
Diesels do work in europe in pasanger cars, but they are small engines that are at work by reason of their size. Plus they have low sulfer fuel over in the UK. Something the US government is reluctant to legislate

David
04-25-07, 09:34 AM
The engines are quite sturdy, when they are " WORKED ".
I'm in the RV business, and we have over 400,000 on our 2001 f350, not uncommon, yet I see people who drive diesels as dailey grocery getters who are having engines replaced because they are not being worked.
Trucks that are on their 3rd motor in 60,000 miles, the same motor we have over 400,000 on
Short tripping kills diesels, They need to be heated up to run right,
Diesels do work in europe in pasanger cars, but they are small engines that are at work by reason of their size. Plus they have low sulfer fuel over in the UK. Something the US government is reluctant to legislate

My commute is about 25 miles one way, what say you?

SeedOfChaos
05-05-07, 05:18 AM
Can't really say much about US made diesel engines or diesels in pickup trucks. I do know that diesels in EU passenger cars tend to be considerably more reliable than gasoline engines.

I guess it depends a lot on the experience a car maker has had with diesel engines as well. For Mercedes diesel vehicles it's not all that uncommon to pass 1,000,000 kilometers with the same engine, especially the W123 & W124 E-Class predecessors, can't say much about the newer ones, as most of those vehicles haven't reached such a mileage yet. Most commercially used vehicles (heavy trucks, delivery trucks, cabs, etc.) are diesels for reliability and fuel economy and thus cost savings. Diesel contains about 15% more energy than gasoline per volume. Thus one gallon of diesel has as much stored energy as 1.15 gallons of gas.

And yes, low-sulphur diesel is common in Northern/Western Europe by now. As far as I know, diesel in the US also contains more water than in the EU, but I would have to look that up at work to be sure.

I think 25 miles a day (or even 50, I don't know if you meant it to be both ways) should serve a diesel just fine. It'll certainly reach its optimal operating temperature, which is important for longevity.

I know one thing for sure... my next car will have a CDI diesel engine. Modern diesel engines have many advantages over a gasoline engine:

- gigantic torque beginning at low rpm's
- more fuel efficient
- with BlueTec and particulate filter, less emissions than a gasoline engine in all categories
- fuel costs less
- the engines are inherently more reliable, as they operate on lower rpm's to pack the same punch.

David
05-11-07, 06:35 AM
Can't really say much about US made diesel engines or diesels in pickup trucks. I do know that diesels in EU passenger cars tend to be considerably more reliable than gasoline engines.

I guess it depends a lot on the experience a car maker has had with diesel engines as well. For Mercedes diesel vehicles it's not all that uncommon to pass 1,000,000 kilometers with the same engine, especially the W123 & W124 E-Class predecessors, can't say much about the newer ones, as most of those vehicles haven't reached such a mileage yet. Most commercially used vehicles (heavy trucks, delivery trucks, cabs, etc.) are diesels for reliability and fuel economy and thus cost savings. Diesel contains about 15% more energy than gasoline per volume. Thus one gallon of diesel has as much stored energy as 1.15 gallons of gas.

And yes, low-sulphur diesel is common in Northern/Western Europe by now. As far as I know, diesel in the US also contains more water than in the EU, but I would have to look that up at work to be sure.

I think 25 miles a day (or even 50, I don't know if you meant it to be both ways) should serve a diesel just fine. It'll certainly reach its optimal operating temperature, which is important for longevity.

I know one thing for sure... my next car will have a CDI diesel engine. Modern diesel engines have many advantages over a gasoline engine:

- gigantic torque beginning at low rpm's
- more fuel efficient
- with BlueTec and particulate filter, less emissions than a gasoline engine in all categories
- fuel costs less
- the engines are inherently more reliable, as they operate on lower rpm's to pack the same punch.

We have low sulphur diesel here as well. American diesels are typically fitted in larger trucks, where the massive low rpm torque is useful in pulling large loads to speed. Pickup trucks with these motors have at least 300 BHP and 400 foot-pounds of torque (The GM model claims 600 foot-pounds). They accelerate fairly well.

I had been under the impression that a maintained diesel was more reliable. The majority of people with whom I have talked, steer me away from them.
The claim is the fuel economy about them same as gas without the additional maintenance concerns. Evidentially, the American behemoth oil burners have an abundance of power which many question as necessary for someone who would only on occasion utilize its potential. The appeal to me is biodiesel, which I hope will gain some level of popularity here in the US.

david