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v6superbug
10-06-00, 07:26 PM
I know that there are 8 kbps in one kBps but how many kilobits per sec and kilobytes per sec in one megabyte per sec. Post if you even understand what I mean. Any help would be appreciated.

John
10-06-00, 07:43 PM
The approximate numbers* are:

1000KiloBytes in one Megabyte
8000kilobits in one Megabyte

Since one MegaByte is 1000KiloBytes we find that there are 125KiloBytes per megabit.

... and 1000kilobits equals one megabit.

* These numbers are the accepted ones for most areas, but networking tech like to use the real precise ones that don't round off.

glc1
10-06-00, 07:45 PM
Originally posted by v6superbug:
I know that there are 8 kbps in one kBps but how many kilobits per sec and kilobytes per sec in one megabyte per sec. Post if you even understand what I mean. Any help would be appreciated.
Huh?
KBps = kilobytes per sec
kbps (or Kbps) = kilobits per sec
mbps (or Mbps) = megabits per sec
1.5mbps connection = ~1500kbps or ~187.5KBps
1megabyte = ~8mbps or ~8000kbps

[This message has been edited by glc1 (edited 10-06-2000).]

glc1
10-06-00, 07:47 PM
Hey John, I thought 1MB = 1024KB?

dannjr
10-06-00, 07:52 PM
It takes 8 bits to equal one byte. This translates to 110 KBps (k-bytes/sec) equaling 880 Kbps (k-bits/sec). More or less the IE download rate isn't as accurate as it seems if you need to see just how well your doing go to http://analogx.com and get the program Netstat live


If I get where you are coming from

------------------

THE WORLDS THINNEST BOOK: THINGS I CAN'T BUY By Bill Gates

Prey521
10-06-00, 08:07 PM
Megabyte


1) As a measure of computer processor storage and real and virtual memory, a megabyte (abbreviated MB) is 2 to the 20th power bytes, or 1,048,576 bytes in decimal notation.

2) According to the IBM Dictionary of Computing, when used to describe disk storage capacity and transmission rates, a megabyte is 1,000,000 bytes in decimal notation.

According to the Microsoft Press Computer Dictionary, a megabyte means either 1,000,000 bytes or 1,048,576 bytes.

According to Eric S. Raymond in The New Hacker's Dictionary, a megabyte is always 1,048,576 bytes on the argument that bytes should naturally be computed in powers of two.

Iomega Corporation uses the decimal megabyte in calling the Zip drive disk a "100MB disk" when it actually holds 100,431,872 bytes. If Iomega used the powers-of-two megabyte, the disk could be said to hold only 95.8 megabytes (if you divide 100,431,872 by 1,048,576).

Megabit

In data communications, a megabit is a million bits, or 1,000,000 (that is, 106) bits. It's commonly used for measuring the amount of data that is transferred in a second between two telecommunication points. For example, a U.S. phone company T-1 line is said to sustain a data rate of 1.544 megabits per second. Megabits per second is usually shortened to Mbps.

Some sources define a megabit to mean 1,048,576 (that is, 220) bits.

[This message has been edited by Prey521 (edited 10-06-2000).]

Prey521
10-06-00, 08:11 PM
Kilobyte

As a measure of computer memory or storage, a kilobyte (KB or Kbyte*) is approximately a thousand bytes (actually, 2 to the 10th power, or decimal 1,024 bytes).


Kilobit

In data communications, a kilobit is a thousand bits, or 1,000 (103) bits. It's commonly used for measuring the amount of data that is transferred in a second between two telecommunication points. Kilobits per second is usually shortened to Kbps.*

Some sources define a kilobit to mean 1,024 (that is, 210) bits. Although the bit is a unit of the binary number system, bits in data communications are discrete signal pulses and have historically been counted using the decimal number system. For example, 28.8 kilobits per second (Kbps) is 28,800 bits per second. Because of computer architecture and memory address boundaries, bytes are always some multiple or exponent of two.

[This message has been edited by Prey521 (edited 10-06-2000).]

John
10-06-00, 09:19 PM
Hey John, I thought 1MB = 1024KB?

I made is easy for the newbie, read my handy disclaimer:


These numbers are the accepted ones for most areas, but networking tech like to use the real precise ones that don't round off.

glc1
10-06-00, 09:32 PM
Originally posted by John:
I made is easy for the newbie, read my handy disclaimer:Ahh, got cha.