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View Full Version : Will a RAID 0 drive show up in Norton Ghost??



caveman
06-01-03, 06:29 PM
Well, will it??:D :D

Faust
06-01-03, 07:04 PM
yes, it should.

hardware RAID is being handled, well, on the hardware level. so, as far as the OS/software apps the "array" is just a single physical drive.

A_old
06-01-03, 07:07 PM
Originally posted by Faust
yes, it should.

hardware RAID is being handled, well, on the hardware level. so, as far as the OS/software apps the "array" is just a single physical drive.

What he said :D

caveman
06-02-03, 10:49 AM
Amen, thank you!

cyberskye
06-02-03, 01:15 PM
Check your versions - it may be 2002 or 2003 of Ghost that is supported. Doesn't mean earlier versions won't work. I think it corresponded with the NTFS support.

Skye

caveman
06-02-03, 05:09 PM
`tis done anywhoos:D :D just gotta transfer some of my other backed up data and sort some cooling out for the drives

cyberskye
06-03-03, 11:38 AM
hardware RAID is being handled, well, on the hardware level. so, as far as the OS/software apps the "array" is just a single physical drive.

True - in a pure HW RAIDed rig - but most IDE RAID cards (Promise, Highpoint) are just a BIOS assisted boot of software RAID - therefore technically software devices. That's why those cards don't work under most unices.

A_old
06-03-03, 11:44 AM
ntfs was supported in older versions, 2002 added official xp ntfs support i think?

cyberskye
06-03-03, 11:50 AM
That may be what I was thinking. It may also have been the disk utility that didn't support RAID...

I remember getting my Adaptec 1200a and finding that the sw RAID card was not supported by either my linux install (dual boot) nor several disk utilities that I had. The 2400a has XOR on teh card - completely hardware.

YARDofSTUF
06-03-03, 04:06 PM
Originally posted by cyberskye
True - in a pure HW RAIDed rig - but most IDE RAID cards (Promise, Highpoint) are just a BIOS assisted boot of software RAID - therefore technically software devices. That's why those cards don't work under most unices.


which cards put the drives in a real hardware RAID then?

Faust
06-04-03, 05:30 AM
True - in a pure HW RAIDed rig - but most IDE RAID cards (Promise, Highpoint) are just a BIOS assisted boot of software RAID - therefore technically software devices. That's why those cards don't work under most unices.



this is true. kind of a technical oversight on my part.

for all intents and purposes, most IDE RAID adapters need a driver/software adapter to run at all (this is why we can still see the full array volume in DOS.... some kind of driver had to have been loaded for it to be seen). aside from the device driver, the array is transparent to the software environment.

now, technically, most SCSI RAID hosts handle RAID in what would be as close to pure hardware as possible. we still need a driver for whatever OS we are using to make it run. may be native to the OS, may not be. i know essentially zero about *nix from a technical standpoint, so i can;t expound on that.


anyways, i stand technically corrected.

cyberskye
06-04-03, 12:39 PM
anyways, i stand technically corrected.

Lucky you didn't need to waste the $$$ on a card to find it out...;) The Adaptec 1200a does not play with BSD.

Think of them as WinModems. Though some manufacturers are building their own linux/bsd drivers.






which cards put the drives in a real hardware RAID then?

A fairly accurate way to determine is if (A) it supports several unix falvors (B) is capable of RAID5. (C) RAM on the card - usually pc100 today - this is because it handles the striping/mirroring/XOR - unburdening the CPU...

Not 100% but if the card can't do all of those then it is sw-based. Adaptec makes a 2400a model I foudn on mwave for $310.00 US. I think Promise and Highpoint are working on similar models.

Cheers,

Skye

cyberskye
06-04-03, 12:48 PM
now, technically, most SCSI RAID hosts handle RAID in what would be as close to pure hardware as possible. we still need a driver for whatever OS we are using to make it run. may be native to the OS, may not be. i know essentially zero about *nix from a technical standpoint, so i can;t expound on that

You need a driver for all hardware - a set of instructions to make the device to what we want. Drivers are always OS-specific

The diff between these two classes of card is like SQL vs C code. With the true HW cards (almost all SCSI RAID, a few IDE) you just stream data at the card. The card 'knows what to do with it' and performs the required calculations and reads/writes as needed. You just tell it "what" to do, as in SQL. Write this data to disk.

With a sw-based RAID card, the CPU is still performing the calculations, taking up space in the process queue. You need to tell it "what" to do and "how" to do it; as in C Code. Write this many chunks to this channel and this many to the other, yadayada